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View Full Version : This old house part deux



Joe (SoCal)
12-10-2010, 09:30 AM
So the house I'm living now has this beautiful bathroom with a claw foot tub and a lovely beadboard that has been pulling and bulging. This last week it's truly popping. So I told my buddy the great WoodenBoat forum can figure this out. So guys give us your best advice.

http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m320/fosterhere/037edd67.png

http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m320/fosterhere/a49177f1.png

http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m320/fosterhere/317a5ef5.png

http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m320/fosterhere/c7e9ae68.png

This is what's behind that wall

http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m320/fosterhere/1eee24f3.png

So what do ya think ?

Mrleft8
12-10-2010, 09:33 AM
You gotta leak back there.

Fitz
12-10-2010, 09:39 AM
Is the dryer vented outside? How old is the beadboard?

botebum
12-10-2010, 09:40 AM
You gotta leak back there.'Zackly.
Pull the washer, find and repair the leak. Then repair the wainscoting. Easy as.

Doug

Paul Pless
12-10-2010, 09:42 AM
So what do ya think ?CPES the water damage, 5200 to put everything back together.

Joe (SoCal)
12-10-2010, 09:42 AM
No apparent water anywhere, nor mold or wetness. But my original thought was leak too.
It's a bitch of a place to work with that big tub next to the wall and about 2 mm work space.

How do we test to find a leak? My buddies solution is to just get a block of wood and hammer it back in place ;)

Paul Pless
12-10-2010, 09:44 AM
It's a bitch of a place to work with that big tub next to the wall and about 2 mm work space.au contraire. . . that big old tub is gonna make repairs very easy, because its gonna be a whole lot easier to remove it than a conventional tub.

Jim Ledger
12-10-2010, 09:46 AM
au contraire. . . that big old tub is gonna make repairs very easy, because its gonna be a whole lot easier to remove it than a conventional tub.


It's an old house, Paul. The repair will never be easy.

Domesticated_Mr. Know It All
12-10-2010, 09:50 AM
My suggestion is use lots of caulking.

Joe (SoCal)
12-10-2010, 09:55 AM
Is the dryer vented outside? How old is the beadboard?

Yea it goes from here

http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m320/fosterhere/c4333061.png

To a vent outside that you can see to the right and down from the window

http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m320/fosterhere/e636e6b6.png

http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m320/fosterhere/ca455ef3.png

S/V Laura Ellen
12-10-2010, 09:56 AM
http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m320/fosterhere/317a5ef5.png


So what do ya think ?

I'd be very concerned about the vertical crack in the wall. Is there water leaking from the outside (leak at the eaves, vent, window)?
It looks like the exterior wall is also pulling away, but hard to tell from the photo.

S/V Laura Ellen
12-10-2010, 09:58 AM
Yea it goes from here

http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m320/fosterhere/c4333061.png



Bingo... I'll bet that the flex vent line buried in the wall is leaking hot moist air into the wall cavity.

botebum
12-10-2010, 10:04 AM
Bingo... I'll bet that the flex vent line buried in the wall is leaking hot moist air into the wall cavity.+1

Doug

Paul Pless
12-10-2010, 10:09 AM
It's an old house, Paul. The repair will never be easy.good point, i was just comparing the removal of two different types of tubs

Canoez
12-10-2010, 10:09 AM
The plastic flex vents still "code" in New Yawk? I think you have to use a metal one in our state now - either hard pipe or the expandable aluminum ones.

Joe (SoCal)
12-10-2010, 10:20 AM
The plastic flex vents still "code" in New Yawk? I think you have to use a metal one in our state now - either hard pipe or the expandable aluminum ones.

It's metal and we are shop vacuuming a ton of lint trapped in the vent line, maybe thats what it was.

S/V Laura Ellen
12-10-2010, 10:22 AM
It's metal and we are shop vacuuming a ton of lint trapped in the vent line, maybe thats what it was.

More accurately stated, it's metal foil and it rots and leaks.
Big problem with that foils flex line is that it isn't smooth on the inside and collects lint. The lint hold moisture like a sponge and the moisture rots the line.
The good aluminum flex line is smoother on the inside and doesn't tend to collect as much lint. But anything buried in a wall should be rigid wall vent pipe.

Iceboy
12-10-2010, 10:42 AM
If you are renting call the landlord. If you are living in a buddies house while they are away contact them before tearing thier house apart. If you don't have a clue as to what you are doing call a pro. You can really screw up a house with bad repairs. Don't make the homeowner hate you.

Joe (SoCal)
12-10-2010, 10:52 AM
CAUSE of the problem !!!!!!!

http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m320/fosterhere/badc7af8.png

It was plugged like a rock
http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m320/fosterhere/bd0fe9f4.png

http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m320/fosterhere/30bbbe99.png

That's my buddy and partner in vent cleaning, so no worries iceboy ;)

http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m320/fosterhere/9bed7f57.png

Vent cleared.

So now how to we fix the wall ?

ChaseKenyon
12-10-2010, 10:54 AM
Bingo... I'll bet that the flex vent line buried in the wall is leaking hot moist air into the wall cavity.

Make that +2.5 for a+3.5 Joe. Been there done that here in this 200 year old sprawling ex bording house.

The metal vent pipe the PO put in went down three feet into the barn basement and then rose back up 18 ft later to vent outside.had a hellion of a time with 54in high fir wainscot. Found the thin steel had rotted. I replaced it with heavy duty (Left over from a commercial energy savings job) flexx aluminum pipe and with the flex was able to keep it almost level to the outside. 27 years later still good as new.:d

Aren't old houses FUN?;)

Joe (SoCal)
12-10-2010, 10:56 AM
Probably the screen is way to fine, what do you think ? The screen in plastic screen door plastic think ?

Jim Ledger
12-10-2010, 11:01 AM
Way too fine, some hardware cloth would be better.

Looks like some moisture issues behind that board and batten siding too.

BarnacleGrim
12-10-2010, 11:05 AM
Easiest solution would be to plug the hole, sell the dryer and get a condensing one instead.

Brian Palmer
12-10-2010, 11:08 AM
That screen is too fine. You want something to keep animals out, nothing finer, or no screen at all. All dryers will blow lint.

Brian

Chris Coose
12-10-2010, 11:10 AM
So now how to we fix the wall ?

Pull the tub.
Pull everything and make it right.

Canoez
12-10-2010, 11:11 AM
We've got a vent hood with a flapper to keep the warm air in when the dryer isn't running. Directly inside is a piece of hardware cloth - about 1cm openings to keep the vermin out but let any lint escape. Could probably install one of those under that box.

Fitz
12-10-2010, 11:34 AM
Thank you,

That will be $90. One hour minimum.

:D


This last week it's truly popping.

PS. If it got a lot worse very RECENTLY, with all this cold weather you may have a wall full of ice??

Iceboy
12-10-2010, 12:17 PM
Good job. Now just fix it up right.

S/V Laura Ellen
12-10-2010, 12:41 PM
So now how to we fix the wall ?

There will be at least one person that won't like the answer.
I would suggest that you need to open up the wall to replace the vent line with a proper thick walled variety. Since there is damage in the area of the bath tub I suggest that is the wall to open up.
You won't know what needs to be done until you start tearing into the wall. Keep tearing until there is no longer and damage visible.
I'm assuming that the plaster in the wall has become saturated with moisture and has pulled away, if this is the case it will need to be removed.
You should be able to save the trim and wainscoting if you are careful.
You need to find out why there is a vertical gap/crack in the wall.
Replace the plaster with drywall and reapply the trim and wainscoting.
Paint and caulk as necessary.
This isn't a small job.

katey
12-10-2010, 12:49 PM
At this point, I'd wait a while to do anything to the wall until the moisture level has re-stabilized at a normal level. And put "cleaning out the lint" on a routine maintenance schedule.

Canoeyawl
12-10-2010, 05:18 PM
That flex hose is just a bad idea no matter what it is made of ...

There is rigid dryer vent pipe.
(I am sometimes amazed at how an entire home can be jepordized by saving just a couple of bucks).

How to install a dryer vent without burning your house down (http://fixitnow.com/appliantology/dryervent_ultimate.htm)

Paul Girouard
12-10-2010, 10:13 PM
http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m320/fosterhere/317a5ef5.png





So what do ya think ?



Nice post Joe you managed to get all the right photo's so a quick and clear assessment could be made.

It looks like 1x6 ish bead board not a paneling type fake bead board. I think you might be able to remove them and save them. That would allow the wall cavity to dry out properly , would make replacing the vent easier , the dry wall or plaster looks like it need ripped out , but the tubs not directly in the way of that.

The wall definitely needs to be opened up and dried out before the repair is made or mold will grow. The bead boards also need to be dried out so they shrink back to normal width , so stored flat and stickered for air to get all around them.

This is sort of the reverse of "getting Tidbit wet" your on the lets dry it out side of things now.

Good luck.

brad9798
12-10-2010, 10:44 PM
Pull the boards off ... let'er dry out for a couple of weeks ... repair the wall, if needed, and tack the boards back on. Finish and paint to taste.

You should be able to put YOUR PINKY FINGER through dryer screens ... and even they will eventually clog!

Better yet, get an indoor vent and use the dryer heat to help heat the house int he winter ...

Think of it as a 'Y-pipe' off the holding tank! ;)

S/V Laura Ellen
12-10-2010, 10:50 PM
Better yet, get an indoor vent and use the dryer heat to help heat the house int he winter ...


Bad idea, there would probably be way to much moisture. This would cause every window in the house to sweat and moisture to collect on every cold surface, leading to rot and mold.

Paul Girouard
12-10-2010, 11:00 PM
Better yet, get an indoor vent and use the dryer heat to help heat the house int he winter ...



Ditto S/V L/E bad idea post. In fact Joe was inadvertently do just that, didn't seem to work out very well.

brad9798
12-11-2010, 01:21 AM
No, he inadvertently vented it in the wall ... BAD IDEA!

Let's not forget that venting inside during winter, as I do, only assists the humidifier ...

NOT a bad idea at all ... rather a good, green idea, based on Joe's geography!

:)

brad9798
12-11-2010, 01:21 AM
Been doing it for nearly 20 years ...

Nary a bad consequence ...

BarnacleGrim
12-11-2010, 04:00 AM
Do they have condensing dryers in the US? It leaves the heat inside the house, but sends the moisture to a reservoir instead.

Like I said, better to eliminate the pipe altogether.

Ron Williamson
12-11-2010, 07:39 AM
I've never seen one.
My dryer vent goes through 15' of insulated crawl space before it exits through a Broan Eco vent.
R

Paul Pless
12-11-2010, 07:44 AM
It leaves the heat inside the house.i see these becoming really popular in the deep south