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Ian McColgin
12-07-2010, 09:38 PM
Saw this in the Daily RFT.com and wonder just what is wrong with these people, that they want to overturn the plain will of their voters and enable the torture of puppies.

Missouri Senator Bill Stouffer Files Bill to Repeal Puppy Mill Law

By Chad Garrison, Thu., Dec. 2 2010 @ 10:07AM

Last week, we told you how Missouri legislators were howling that they would repeal a ballot initiative passed November 2 placing new restrictions on dog breeders.

Proposition B, aimed to tackle Missouri's designation as the Puppy Mill Capital of America, largely came down to a vote between rural and urban districts. The measure passed with 51.6 percent of the vote.

Yesterday state senator Bill Stouffer, from the small town of Napton, Missour-ah, showed that he's got as much bite as bark -- officially filing a bill to repeal Prop. B.

"It does nothing to solve the problem of dog abuse," Stouffer told the Associated Press. "It only targets licensed dealers, and people that are ignoring the law now are not affected by this."

A representative from the ballot initiative responded: "It's a little frustrating that Proposition B has literally just passed, and the Legislature believes that it is time to replace it with its view of the issue."

Stouffer is something of a conservative lightning rod in the Senate. Over the past year, the Republican has also backed a measure to drug test welfare recipients and a resolution to keep keep the military's Don't Ask, Don't Tell policy.

# # #

Shang
12-07-2010, 11:16 PM
..."It does nothing to solve the problem of dog abuse," Stouffer told the Associated Press. "It only targets licensed dealers, and people that are ignoring the law now are not affected by this."

elieves that it is time to replace it with its view of the issue."...

...Stouffer is something of a conservative lightning rod in the Senate. Over the past year, the Republican has also backed a measure to drug test welfare recipients and a resolution to keep keep the military's Don't Ask, Don't Tell policy.

# # #

Stouffer is generally in low esteem in Missouri, but he does inadvertently make a point here, unlicensed illegal puppy mills are commonplace, and their operators laugh at the law.
Further, the law that was passed has too many loopholes. For instance, a licensed dog breeding facility is permitted to have fifty breeding dogs. FIFTY BREEDING DOGS! Can you imagine what kind of operation this would have to be?
But in any case there are so few inspectors that the law is unlikely to be enforced very well.

This "dog factory" is one of the nice ones, the dogs are confined to small carriers and stacked three high. Other backwoods kennels are horrendous.

http://www.jackrussellcare.com/images/pupMillCrop.jpg

Glen Longino
12-08-2010, 01:41 AM
It's not just dogs!
It's also Guinea pigs and hampsters.
Near where I live there is a guy who has 169,000 breeding Guinea pigs.
169,000!
A veterinarian friend of mine spends most of his time caring for them for big bucks.
Do the math...169,000 times $40, twice a year. Greedy bastids!

S.V. Airlie
12-08-2010, 02:36 PM
Well it says that this is only for licensed breeders. I have no idea what is entailed to get a license... but it should not have an effect elsewhere at least on paper.

Shang
12-08-2010, 02:48 PM
http://media.columbiamissourian.com/multimedia/2009/04/06/media/PuppyMills2_t_w600_h1200.jpg

CHERYL WITTENAUER/The Associated Press:

When authorities raided J.B.'s Precious Puppies, they discovered more than 200 dogs standing in their own excrement, crammed three and four to a cage. Some were so sickly they were missing clumps of hair. The skeletal remains of puppies and adult dogs were found inside pet-food bags.
The ghastly scene deep in the Ozarks has become far too common in Missouri.
Missouri is the "puppy mill" capital of America, home to more than 4,000 shoddy and inhumane dog-breeding businesses, by one estimate…
…Missouri has been No. 1 in puppy mills for decades, with fly-by-night breeders — both licensed and unlicensed — selling pups churned out by dogs that spend their entire lives in cages. The pets are sold through classified ads, in pet stores and over the Internet...

skuthorp
12-08-2010, 02:52 PM
Now if ever there was an offense that warranted the death penalty................................ maybe just confine them to a small cage and starve them to death.

S.V. Airlie
12-08-2010, 03:01 PM
I don't like..okay I hate puppy mills for the reasons you have given and also the genetic defects many of them have. I would expect those that have licenses to be a lot better. Then again I have no idea what the requirements are for a lic. who monitors them etc. If it's anything like the boater safety lic. to me it doesn't mean much except a fee. and a short test.

Ian McColgin
12-09-2010, 07:59 AM
The law is new so obviously there's no enforcement mechanism in place yet, nor even a way to close up the many unregistered mills. The people of Missouri passed this law over their legislature's contemptuously profit-driven distain for life as a first step. They cannot expect their government to move on this without more direct voter action. It's bad. It'll be slow. But I give the voters of Missouri full credit for making a start against all the hopelessness, cynicism, and animal curelty mounted against them.

brad9798
12-09-2010, 10:14 PM
There is MUCH more to this legislation, based on history of the HSUS, than meets the eye ...

Although I HATE anything that would even insinuate hurting/mistreating animals (and NOT just d-o-g-s, BTW), I voted AGAINST this legislation ...

We'll see how it works out ...

Do folks really think unlicensed breeders give a sh*t about this new law? :rolleyes:

Ian McColgin
12-10-2010, 10:14 AM
L.Boyle is clearly closer to the situation than I am. I cannot see a reason to not make a start in establishing legal means for closing inhumane puppy mills by establishing a registration process that requires all breeding over simple home breeding to be registered and setting a framework for enforceable standards. Sometimes there are reasons why people who agree with the general goal might see a specific proposal as exacerbating rather than mitigating, a problem. On this, reasonable and humane people may, often do, disagree. From the news reports, I do not see the legislature's move to overturn the law as motivated by the same honorable motives as L. Boyle's vote against the law was.