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Andrew Craig-Bennett
12-07-2010, 09:29 AM
This is for five greedy people or six ordinary people.

Take a good pound of stewing steak and three or four lamb's kidneys (not, under any circumstances, pig's kidneys and certainly not ox kidneys - calves' kidneys you might get away with). Brown them in a little oil; in another pan do the same with a couple of onions, a couple of stalks of celery and a couple of carrots, all diced. Transfer to a saucepan and add a half pint or so of stout; reduce this a bit, then add the meat and simmer slowly for an hour and a half. Adjust the seasoning and add worcester sauce if you like.

Meanwhile take half a pound of beef suet and a pound of self raising flour, add salt and pepper, combine them and add just enough water to make a dough; rest this for five minutes and then roll it out about half an inch thick. Butter and flour a two pound pudding basin, line it with the pastry, spoon in the filling, close the top, with a lid made from the remaining pastry, cover with greaseproof paper and foil, steam for a couple of hours or more or for preference steam for 30 minutes to let the dough rise then pressure cook for a couple of hours. if there is too much juice, call the remainder gravy.

Turn out.

Eat with hearty vegetables.

TomF
12-07-2010, 09:43 AM
Can I come for dinner? None of my household are smart enough to enjoy such a dish.

Pugwash
12-07-2010, 09:46 AM
Meanwhile take half a pound of bee suet and a pound of self raising flour,

The problem with bee suet is that it's a pain to collect and for half a pound you need a lot of bees.

Andrew Craig-Bennett
12-07-2010, 10:20 AM
The purist (I have done this) asks his old fashioned butcher for a pound of fresh suet, cleans and shreds it and discards the less good bits.

The man in a hurry uses shredded suet from the supermarket.

I hope I may persuade an American to try this - the pudding comes out of the basin a golden yellow-brown colour and it tastes and smells delicious.

BarnacleGrim
12-07-2010, 10:50 AM
I'll ask for lamb kidneys when I'm out buying the ham.

Peerie Maa
12-07-2010, 01:33 PM
DON'T put the carrots and celery in the pud. OK for flavouring the stock, but not in the pud please. I like mine served with mushy peas.

Me Mam used to do a great pudding with bacon and onions. Roll the suet paste out into a rectangle, lay sliced and separated onions and cut up bacon rashers on the paste leaving one edge uncovered. Roll up into a rolly poly, wrap in grease proof paper and then roll into a linen cloth, steam as Andrew directs.

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
12-07-2010, 01:50 PM
The celery is optional.


I'm told that some folk like it.

Tristan
12-07-2010, 02:43 PM
Ah you evil torturing bastid! Haven't had a real steak and kidney pie for over 30 years! Now you've brought it all back, and you even brought back the memory of the "gravy." It's taken me years for the longing to diminish. Now you've brought it all back!

Andrew Craig-Bennett
10-20-2017, 08:20 AM
I think I should bring this old post out again; its coming to the time of year...

Norman Bernstein
10-20-2017, 08:21 AM
I love liver... but I draw the line, at kidneys :)

SKIP KILPATRICK
10-20-2017, 08:31 AM
This is for five greedy people or six ordinary people.

Take a good pound of stewing steak and three or four lamb's kidneys (not, under any circumstances, pig's kidneys and certainly not ox kidneys - calves' kidneys you might get away with). Brown them in a little oil; in another pan do the same with a couple of onions, a couple of stalks of celery and a couple of carrots, all diced. Transfer to a saucepan and add a half pint or so of stout; reduce this a bit, then add the meat and simmer slowly for an hour and a half. Adjust the seasoning and add worcester sauce if you like.

Meanwhile take half a pound of beef suet and a pound of self raising flour, add salt and pepper, combine them and add just enough water to make a dough; rest this for five minutes and then roll it out about half an inch thick. Butter and flour a two pound pudding basin, line it with the pastry, spoon in the filling, close the top, with a lid made from the remaining pastry, cover with greaseproof paper and foil, steam for a couple of hours or more or for preference steam for 30 minutes to let the dough rise then pressure cook for a couple of hours. if there is too much juice, call the remainder gravy.

Turn out.

Eat with hearty vegetables.

This might not be legal in the United States. I believe this falls outside the 1st Amendment protections.

suet is reserved to feed the song birds in winter.


This is pudding: http://food.fnr.sndimg.com/content/dam/images/food/fullset/2004/2/4/0/sd1e28_triple_chocolate_pudding.jpg.rend.hgtvcom.6 16.462.suffix/1387411404519.jpeg


or banana http://food.fnr.sndimg.com/content/dam/images/food/fullset/2014/1/30/0/SM0310H_Banana-Pudding_S4x3.jpg.rend.hgtvcom.616.462.suffix/1391138894552.jpeg

TomF
10-20-2017, 08:37 AM
Dad loved steak and kidney pie. For him the best part was the contrast in texture between the smooth curved edges of the kidney pieces, and the square-cut chunks of beef. I picked up the gene from him somehow, but haven't passed it on. ;)

isla
10-20-2017, 08:42 AM
I love steak and kidney, but prefer it in pie form with a shortcrust pastry. Nevertheless, I will pass on your recipe to my missus. Thanks Andrew.

woodpile
10-20-2017, 08:47 AM
Andrew Zimmern of Bizarre Foods would be proud of you

isla
10-20-2017, 08:54 AM
I remember an occasion when my American Sister-in-law and her husband came to visit and we took them out to dinner. My BIL saw "steak and kidney pie" on the menu and ordered it. He was very surprised when it was served. He was expecting two items, a steak, and a kidney pie. :D

Garret
10-20-2017, 10:11 AM
I've always loved the taste of steak & kidney pie, but had to learn not to inhale as I brought the forkful up to my mouth. Sure has a smell of what kidneys produce!

Keith Wilson
10-20-2017, 10:21 AM
Y'know, de gustibus and all that, but I think I'm starting to understand why my ancestors left fair Albion's shores.

isla
10-20-2017, 10:36 AM
Y'know, de gustibus and all that, but I think I'm starting to understand why my ancestors left fair Albion's shores.

What, so they could invent cheeseburgers, chili dogs and chocolate fudge brownie milkshake? :d
But it's not all bad Keith. Back in the 19th century steak and kidney pudding would probably have included oysters, which were cheap and plentiful at the time.

Keith Wilson
10-20-2017, 10:50 AM
What, so they could invent cheeseburgers, chili dogs and chocolate fudge brownie milkshake? :d
But it's not all bad Keith. Back in the 19th century steak and kidney pudding would probably have included oysters, which were cheap and plentiful at the time.Oh, we've done far worse than that. :D Some of the triumphs of modern industrial chemistry available in individual-sized bags from vending machines would amaze you. Actually, I think oysters would be an improvement. Now if you could just leave out the kidneys . . . . Oysters were cheap and plentiful here too, until a combination of overfishing and pollution pretty much killed 'em off in Chesapeake Bay.

pipefitter
10-20-2017, 11:34 AM
This leads you to where you can kind of figure out why stout was invented. Not for going in it, so much as quickly washing it all down after, for the amount of salt you'd have to add to make it edible.

Even while in Ireland I got the idea that meals were more an inconvenience of necessity than of pleasure. Or how most of the products of the spice trade must have never made it much further than the islands along the way. Probably most traded off to make room for tobacco.

Guts ain't groceries.

Not really knocking what other people like. Southern soul food sure has it's use of animal byproducts and lesser critters of the not-so-civilized world, but these folks really know how to bring it all together. Everything else, just bury it in bacon. :D

Peerie Maa
10-20-2017, 11:39 AM
But it's not all bad Keith. Back in the 19th century steak and kidney pudding would probably have included oysters, which were cheap and plentiful at the time.

Which brings us to the other winter staple Lancashire Hotpot.
Ingredients for four helpings
2 Tbsp Olive Oil (or Butter if preferred)
1kg Lamb (https://blackpudding.club/ingredient/lamb), Neck chops are favourite,
200g Lamb Kidney (https://blackpudding.club/ingredient/lamb-kidney), sliced (Optional)
2 medium Onions (https://blackpudding.club/ingredient/onions), sliced
3 Carrots (https://blackpudding.club/ingredient/carrots), peeled & cubed
2 cloves Garlic (https://blackpudding.club/ingredient/garlic), crushed
1 tbsp Plain Flour
2 Tbsp Worcestershire Sauce (https://blackpudding.club/ingredient/worcestershire-sauce)
500ml Beef Stock (https://blackpudding.club/ingredient/beef-stock)
A sprig of Rosemary (https://blackpudding.club/ingredient/rosemary) or Thyme (https://blackpudding.club/ingredient/thyme)
2 fresh Bay Leaves (https://blackpudding.club/ingredient/bay-leaf)
50g Butter (https://blackpudding.club/ingredient/butter)
(Sea) Salt & Freshly Ground Black Pepper to season
400g Black Pudding, casing removed, sliced
1kg Maris Piper (https://blackpudding.club/ingredient/maris-piper) Potatoes, sliced thin

Preheat the oven to 180C/350F/Gas 4.
Toss the chops in the flour and brown.
Grease the insides of a casserole.
Layer the veg, meat, and black pudding in the casserole topped with a layer of potatoes.
Repeat until all is in, finishing with a couple of oysters if you have them under the last layer of the potatoes.
Cover with the stock.
Put lidded casserole in oven for a minimum of 1 1/2 hours until the taties are cooked. Take lid off for last 15 minutes to brown the spuds,
Serve with either mushy peas or pickled onions sliced and pickled red cabbage.

Breakaway
10-20-2017, 11:54 AM
Sounds good, Andrew. I will give it a try soon.

Kevin

Phillip Allen
10-20-2017, 12:15 PM
This might not be legal in the United States. I believe this falls outside the 1st Amendment protections.

suet is reserved to feed the song birds in winter.


This is pudding: http://food.fnr.sndimg.com/content/dam/images/food/fullset/2004/2/4/0/sd1e28_triple_chocolate_pudding.jpg.rend.hgtvcom.6 16.462.suffix/1387411404519.jpeg


or banana http://food.fnr.sndimg.com/content/dam/images/food/fullset/2014/1/30/0/SM0310H_Banana-Pudding_S4x3.jpg.rend.hgtvcom.616.462.suffix/1391138894552.jpeg

thank you skip... pudding is meant to be a kind of confection... a desert

Peerie Maa
10-20-2017, 12:21 PM
Guts ain't groceries.



If you are going to kill an animal for food, you should eat as much of it as you can.
Heart, liver, kidneys, tripes sweetbreads, trotters and cow heels, tongue, brawn, everything but the squeak.
Back when we moved here to Barrow there was a shop selling nothing but tripe, elder and cow heels.

SKIP KILPATRICK
10-20-2017, 12:23 PM
If you are going to kill an animal for food, you should eat as much of it as you can.
Heart, liver, kidneys, tripes sweetbreads, trotters and cow heels, tongue, brawn, everything but the squeak.
Back when we moved here to Barrow there was a shop selling nothing but tripe, elder and cow heels.

And people complain about English Cuisine!

I'm not even sure what some of those things are.

amish rob
10-20-2017, 12:25 PM
If you are going to kill an animal for food, you should eat as much of it as you can.
Heart, liver, kidneys, tripes sweetbreads, trotters and cow heels, tongue, brawn, everything but the squeak.
Back when we moved here to Barrow there was a shop selling nothing but tripe, elder and cow heels.

Agreed. I eat every thing but filters, can I help it. I avoid all filters. Personal choice.

Peace,
Robert

Hwyl
10-20-2017, 12:25 PM
A much better pudding. Home made is better, but I'm going for effect.

ACB is rumoured to have made plum Duff (another pudding) under the tutelage of Bill Tilman, he is yet to share the recipe.
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51BkeNe%2B0GL.jpg

Phillip Allen
10-20-2017, 12:25 PM
And people complain about English Cuisine!

I'm not even sure what some of those things are.

mostly offal

amish rob
10-20-2017, 12:27 PM
mostly offal


Okay. You got me. THAT is very funny.

Peace,
Robert

TomF
10-20-2017, 12:43 PM
My wife has evil memories of tripe from a couple of years of childhood spent in Australia.

Keith Wilson
10-20-2017, 01:13 PM
ACB is rumoured to have made plum Duff (another pudding) under the tutelage of Bill Tilman . . . .
"Pitchfork' Ben himself? What a mark of distinction! :D You can read about the S.O.B here.
(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benjamin_Tillman)
https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/stlamerican.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/e8/4e81d83c-1aab-11e5-8853-df69b1fbe65b/558b0bc4573b6.image.jpg

Clarkey
10-20-2017, 01:23 PM
"Pitchfork' Ben himself? What a mark of distinction! :D You can read about the S.O.B here.
(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benjamin_Tillman)
https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/stlamerican.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/e8/4e81d83c-1aab-11e5-8853-df69b1fbe65b/558b0bc4573b6.image.jpg

Erm...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_Tilman

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f4/HaroldWilliamTilman.jpg/220px-HaroldWilliamTilman.jpg

Keith Wilson
10-20-2017, 01:33 PM
Indeed. Mr. Tilman with one L is a VAST improvement. (I knew that, actually, but couldn't resist.)

CliveP
10-20-2017, 04:38 PM
We always believed the pig's squeak went with the left over mashed spuds & cabbage to make.....
wait for it......
bubble & squeak!

PeterSibley
10-20-2017, 05:00 PM
Just like Mum used to make !