PDA

View Full Version : Following The Alexander's footsteps



Syed
11-14-2010, 05:10 AM
From another thread (http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?122406-This-is-going-to-be-a-lot-harder-than-I-thought-it-would-be.);

Alexander the Great left his mark all around this area. I've posted pictures of several.

The latest skirmish was minor. Not sure, but it's Hajj time, and winter is going to set in soon, so there's been a minor increase in activity, and pot-shots taken at aircraft etc.

From the little knowledge of history that I have, it appears to me that Alexander The Great did try to avoid the entire region of present days Afghanistan and he traveled alongside the Persian Gulf to Indus and towards North up to Tajikistan and Uzbekistan. The war did spread into nearby Afghanistan but did not go well for Alexander's forces. Most of his marks, if any, should be near Iran/Afghan border only.

skuthorp
11-14-2010, 05:20 AM
A good point Syed, maybe he followed established trade routes? That way there would have been a trail to follow, guides available, water, established river crossings, towns to either sack or raid for supplies etc.

Syed
11-14-2010, 06:57 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=thAS28SWKKU&feature=player_embedded#!

BrianW
11-14-2010, 07:14 AM
Excellent idea for a thread Syed!

I'll try to watch the video later, when I won't interfere with others trying to check the internet.

Milo Christensen
11-14-2010, 08:54 AM
The maps indicate that Alexander moved the length of southern Afghanistan from Kandahar (which was definitely Alexandria in Arachosia) in 330 BC moving along what is now highway A1 east to west until they got to Kabul and crossed at the Khyber Pass. A large part of the retreating army, led by General Craterus started on the Indus River in what is now Pakistan and crossed the mountains back to Kandahar through the Mulla and Bolan Passes. The map at the wikipedia article (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/40/MacedonEmpire.jpg)is huge, I'll just post a link to it.

Milo Christensen
11-14-2010, 09:25 AM
Of course, to give Syed's ancestors their due, there haven't been too many invading armies that have retreated back into Afghanistan, have there?

Syed
11-14-2010, 09:54 AM
Thank you, for the link to a good clear map.

BTW, Syed's ancestors came here only a few centuries back.

Gerarddm
11-14-2010, 11:49 AM
Rugged country, wow.

Supposedly Julius Caesar cried when he realized he'd never accomplish what Alexander did by the time he died.

purri
11-14-2010, 05:01 PM
I think Syed is saying his mob arrived abt the C15th (Mughals?)

purri
11-14-2010, 05:08 PM
BTW anyone read Oxiana or A Short Walk in the Hindu Kush?

Syed
11-15-2010, 01:17 AM
I think Syed is saying his mob arrived abt the C15th (Mughals?)

Arab traders sailed to Indian shores long before Mughals invaded India.

The ancestors were Arabs and are traceable to Ahmadabad, Indian coastal Town.
;) It's a pity they left (to be) the oil rich land.

Stiletto
11-15-2010, 01:33 AM
Most interesting. Thankyou Syed.

skuthorp
11-15-2010, 02:38 AM
BTW anyone read Oxiana or A Short Walk in the Hindu Kush?
Read both purri, I read Eric Newby's book every 18 months or so. I also have several volumes of a collection of stories about the Raj, "Small Wars of the Empire". Very strong on the part played by Indian NCO's under junior British officers in small actions that include some excursions into Afghanistan and the Khyber pass area. Very complimentary about Sihks and Pathans in particular.

seanz
11-15-2010, 02:55 AM
Thank you, for the link to a good clear map.

BTW, Syed's ancestors came here only a few centuries back.

NZ wasn't even settled when Alexander was on his "Grand Tour".

purri
11-15-2010, 03:47 AM
Apologies and thank you Syed; and may you and your forebears be at rest in your homes.

Syed
11-15-2010, 04:53 AM
purri,
I actually appreciate the guess you made, and thank you for your kind wishing.

purri
11-15-2010, 05:54 AM
purri,
I actually appreciate the guess you made, and thank you for your kind wishing.

No worries my friend. We too have a long term history of visitation by others since abt 1000BCE for the better (or worse) of our many societies.

May your house be a safe place for you and yours.

BrianW
11-15-2010, 07:15 AM
Here's a picture, I found on the internet, of the fortress in the city of Farah, built by Alexander the Great...

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v136/BrianW/Afghanistan/feb-scenery-9.jpg

Another in the city of Herat...

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v136/BrianW/Afghanistan/The-Citadel.jpg

Syed
11-15-2010, 07:58 AM
After starting this thread, I have learnt that he did not simply encircled this area but made the whole land, part of his empire.

http://www.preceptaustin.org/AlexanderDomain.jpg

Bruce Taylor
11-15-2010, 10:04 AM
Here's a picture, I found on the internet, of the fortress in the city of Farah, built by Alexander the Great...

Something about that structure didn't look Hellenic, to me, so I Googled it. The entry in Wikipedia does claim the citadel in Farah was built by Alexander; but I also ran across an anonymous comment by a guest on a Flickr photo page which suggests that Alexander's fortress was actually a different structure, located nearby:


The citadel in Farah city was not built by Alexander the Greatn nor is it "ancient". The citadel is only estimated to be between 200-300 years old. The castle that Alexander built is on a hilltop south of the city near the ANA Kandak. It is a very steep climb and not much of the castle is left besides a few walls and a well.

Anonymous posts by guests on Flickr are not exactly authoritative ;) ; but as I say, something about that fortress just doesn't look right.