PDA

View Full Version : Set your clocks



bobbys
11-07-2010, 11:48 AM
I dunno why but this is always very confusing to me, My wife sets some of the clocks but not all, I have to have my kids set the digital ones, So it takes a week or so to get them all in unision with each other, Not to mention they all are a bit slower or faster.

Then to add to the mix my wife cheats on some so as not to be late?.

Daylight Saving Time ends Nov. 7

From Staff Reports


Published: Thursday, November 4, 2010 1:51 PM CDT
Daylight Saving Time comes to an end at 2 a.m. Sunday, when clocks across the United States “fall back” one hour to Standard Time. Daylight Saving Time for 2010 began March 14.



DST was instituted in the United States during World War I in order to save energy for war production by taking advantage of the later hours of daylight between April and October. During World War II, the federal government again required the states to observe the time change. Between the wars and after World War II, states and communities could choose whether or not to observe DST. In 1966, Congress passed the Uniform Time Act, which standardized DST to begin on the last Sunday of April and end on the last Sunday of October.

DST increased by four weeks in 2007 with the passage of the Energy Policy Act in 2005. The act extended Daylight Saving Time by four weeks – from the second Sunday of March to the first Sunday of November – with the hope that it would save 10,000 barrels of oil each day through reduced use of power by businesses during daylight hours.


Arizona and Hawaii, along with some Indian reservations, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands and American Samoa, do not observe Daylight Saving Time..

Arizona?

Michael D. Storey
11-07-2010, 11:53 AM
[QUOTE=bobbys;2768519]

DST was instituted in the United States during World War I in order to save energy for war production by taking advantage of the later hours of daylight between April and October. During World War II, the federal government again required the states to observe the time change. Between the wars and after World War II, states and communities could choose whether or not to observe DST. In 1966, Congress passed the Uniform Time Act, which standardized DST to begin on the last Sunday of April and end on the last Sunday of October.

DST increased by four weeks in 2007 with the passage of the Energy Policy Act in 2005. The act extended Daylight Saving Time by four weeks – from the second Sunday of March to the first Sunday of November – with the hope that it would save 10,000 barrels of oil each day through reduced use of power by businesses during daylight hours.


In truth, Benjamin Franklin thought it up as a way, when lighting was mainly by lightning, to get more daylight out of a day.

I would like to propose that in addition to smoke and monoxide batteries, it would be a good time to change things like air filters, including the remote ones that continue to rob us with their clognitude.

Ian McColgin
11-07-2010, 12:12 PM
Franklin actually advocated changing shop hours to conserve candles - early to bed and early to rise and all that. Which before there was such a thing as standard time which had been necessitated by railroads was pretty much what people did anyway. Some cultures actually adjusted the length of hours to have twelve during daylight and twelve in the dark, and rural people lived by the sun and the seasonal rhythms anyway.

There was a time I kept my watch on Greenwich time but that seemed pretentious in the long run.

I am always surprised that people have trouble with all this, and ernestly pray that they are never at 180W/E on this day.

paladin
11-07-2010, 10:10 PM
What batteries....just something to replace and pay hard money for......

Ironmule
11-07-2010, 11:32 PM
I was at work at the moment the change went into effect.

None of the robots in the assembly line quit working, but the master computer that has final approval of whether Mercedes will pay for our work output decided it didn't know anything about the serial numbers involved for about an hour or so's production.

What had been the cleanup shift this week, as we build fuel tanks for M class and R class Mercedes, stretched from 8 to 10 to 12 to 12.75 hours as we tried to get the computer to admit we were building good fuel tanks.

We finally put them in shipping racks with tags on them to not be shipped untill someone from administration straightens out the problem Monday. My 4 to 12 shift finshed at 5AM this morning because computers are brilliant idiots.

I have better things to do at 5AM on a Sunday morning than to be fighting with a computor about whether my work was good enough.

BarnacleGrim
11-08-2010, 05:09 AM
I wish we had another week of DST as well. Or UTC+2 year round.

It would be kind of cool to have a master and a set of slave clocks from an old ship. I wonder if they auction off old equipment to collectors anywhere.


What batteries....just something to replace and pay hard money for......
Unfortunately none of my mechanical clocks work properly. I need to find a good clockmaker. I guess Huygens will go down in time as the inventor of the fake pendulum on "old-timey" quartz clocks.

phiil
11-08-2010, 08:51 AM
I like it. It gives me a chance to reset my watch to this: www.time.gov which is the most accurate I've found. (although they replace their regular content with a simpler display during these days of high demand.

Or, as my uncle used to say: "Let's all circumcise our watches."

paladin
11-08-2010, 08:53 AM
I have three wind up time pieces.....the wrist watch works all the time, the others get wound up on Sunday morning. All set to GMT.