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DavidF
10-30-2010, 05:42 PM
I've been looking for a boat to build with the boy. He wants a small go-fast boat that is exciting and stable (he's 14 and antagonistic toward contradictions.) He loves the sunfish but wants something in wood that he could also row and fish from. He and I both love the lines of the New Haven Sharpie.
http://rpmedia.ask.com/ts?u=/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/07/New_Haven_sharpie_drawing.svg/300px-New_Haven_sharpie_drawing.svg.png
Do you think the New Haven could be scaled down to 12 feet or so?
Thanks for your opinions,
David

Peerie Maa
10-30-2010, 05:47 PM
Only if you increase the beam and freeboard. Someone else will be along soon with a 12' design with similar character that will be a safer boat.

sailboy3
10-30-2010, 05:53 PM
John Gardener's "Building Classic Small Craft' P. 122, i think, is what you're looking for. Also check out the Goat Island Skiff, not a sharpie but otherwise fits the requirements.

WI-Tom
10-30-2010, 06:24 PM
You might want to look at Jim Michalak's Ladybug or Mixer; these are very simple boats with something of a sharpie character in the hull. Both use a balance lug--you'll find many balance lug enthusiasts on this forum, myself included. A very simple, cheap, and powerful rig.

Here's the 12' Mixer:

http://www.duckworksbbs.com/plans/jim/mixer/index.htm

and the 14' Ladybug:

http://www.duckworksbbs.com/plans/jim/ladybug/index.htm

Good luck!

Tom

Bill Perkins
10-30-2010, 07:16 PM
Mystic has an interesting sharpie skiff(transom stern ) . Built for the children of a prominent New Haven oyster man around 1888.The plans are at Mystic ,and shown in Ben Fuller's "87 Boat Designs" ; a catalog of small boat designs from the museum. She's 15 ft. 9 in.by 5ft. 1 IN. She has 3 mast steps ;to be sailed as a cat ketch or cat .The profile definitely shows the sharpie heritage .This could be a good starting point .

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4020/5129512743_26ac41565e_m.jpg

James McMullen
10-30-2010, 11:19 PM
What about the Goat Island Skiff? That's already about the right size and it's a proven performer.

Songololo
10-31-2010, 07:08 AM
What about the Ech Bay Dory Skiff:

http://www.clintchaseboatbuilder.com/resources/EBDSonBeach.jpg

http://www.clintchaseboatbuilder.com/resources/EBDSresized3.jpg

More details here (http://www.clintchaseboatbuilder.com/5.html)...

Matthew L
10-31-2010, 07:51 AM
With Sunfish experience behind him, Dave Carnell's Nutmeg AKA the $200 sailboat AKA a modified Bolger Windsprint (http://www.smallboatforum.com/1_FSB/1fsb.htm) might be just the ticket. It's a new hull for the standard Sunfish rig, with factory or wooden spars. A new sail is cheap and available in fun colors. With a little added flotation it is a great general purpose boat.

http://sites.google.com/site/molepages/200_sailboat.jpg

spirit
10-31-2010, 08:32 AM
If you want a sensible and good looking classic, Reuel Parker has adapted a Chapelle sharpie for plywood construction that has excellent characteristics for your son's wishes.
See Parker's "The Sharpie Book" and the nice write-up in WB 120 (September/October 1994).
This stable sailboat is 5'6" x 17'10." Its mast is free-standing and demountable, and its rig has an easy-to-use sprit-boomed leg-o-mutton sail.
The board is forward, allowing the boat to weathercock when a fish hits, and leaving ample room in the cockpit for rowing and fishing.

luckystrike118
11-04-2010, 05:01 AM
What about the Goat Island Skiff? That's already about the right size and it's a proven performer.

I agree fully, the GIS fills the bill perfectly. Grreeetings from the North Sea Coast, Michel

mommicked
11-07-2010, 06:28 PM
You might look at the Oystercatcher. She is a tad longer than your 12', but almost exactly the same look and shape. You might give it a look:
http://www.broadlyboats.com/modules.php?name=Sections&op=printpage&artid=1

Daniel Noyes
11-07-2010, 08:36 PM
I've been looking for a boat to build with the boy. He wants a small go-fast boat that is exciting and stable (he's 14 and antagonistic toward contradictions.) He loves the sunfish but wants something in wood that he could also row and fish from. He and I both love the lines of the New Haven Sharpie.
http://rpmedia.ask.com/ts?u=/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/07/New_Haven_sharpie_drawing.svg/300px-New_Haven_sharpie_drawing.svg.png
Do you think the New Haven could be scaled down to 12 feet or so?
Thanks for your opinions,
David

12' for this design is a little short, It would make a wonderfull small boat at 15-16' like a sailing canoe, you will have a beautifull small boat that should perform well under sail and oars.

be sure to include flotation so it can be self rescued out on the water

Geoff C
11-08-2010, 06:59 AM
The Chapelle 14' skiff has a similar look and is a fast sailer. The building plans are here: http://www.duckworksmagazine.com/04/s/articles/chapelle/index.cfm%20

There is a plywood version in The Sharpie Book.

Rescaling to 12' shouldn't be too hard.

http://www.duckworksmagazine.com/04/s/articles/chapelle/C2a.gif

wtarzia
11-08-2010, 03:50 PM
Unless there is a great reason for scaling down to 12 feet, why build one so small? You can still solo as big a boat as will fit in a garage or trailer behind an economy car, say up to 18 feet. And you have a boat that will stay with a growing sailor (skills, not just body). I made this mistake when I got my first pro job and could afford a boat. I had Lowells Boat Shop build me an ~ 12 foot dory-skiff, thinking to economize a little and that this size would do me just fine. Could not have been more wrong. Yes, 15 feet should be the smallest (18 is better, OK, unless being rowed solo by a 14 year old). The Mystic design is handsome.

I sail Mystic's little 12 footer when I am down there during rental season. This boat is called The Fenwick, a little cat, is about 12 feet long, not too wide, maybe 4 feet and a fraction, carvel built, and carries a Gunter rig of about 70 sq. ft. I haven't seen its bottom (it has a deck to keep the crew dry, but I am thinking it may not be flat bottomed, may be a shallow V?). It is fun to sail in the crowded little area they allow you to play in, and if you had only an hour at a time to sail, I thought this boat and rig would not be a bad choice. Now for your 14 year old who wants some speed, no. I had it out on a very gusty day on purpose to check its speed for the hell of it, and it seemed to max at 4.5 knots. Of course speed is relative, and in a small boat making a lot of noise, with the relatively big Gunter making you stay alert, it can seem fast and is definitely fun (though very hard on the knees of this not-teenager). But 'fast' becomes more absolute when the teenager sees 15 foot boats passing by (and is't it true, being a teen is all about comparing oneself to others?). Just a thought. --Wade

wdbeyer
11-08-2010, 06:02 PM
Just my 2 cents, but I agree with Wade. I just got my copy of The Sharpie Book today, and after looking at a ton of designs in the 14' range, I've narrowed down to either the 18' modified sharpie or the 19' Ohio sharpie.... or Chapelle's Chincoteague skiff. either will fit in the garage for the winter build and be plenty for my girl and I to sail next summer.

Ben Fuller
11-08-2010, 10:30 PM
John G. drew a small sharpie for plywood construction, I think around 19 feet. One of the characteristics of a sharpie is that they are pretty narrow relative to length. The various aforementioned skiffs above are relatively wider and deeper. The Mystic one is a lot of fun; you can get her underway from a mooring, sail her all over the river and put her back on the mooring without unlashing the tiller. The Fenwick is a real dinghy shape, and as I recall has an arc bottom similar to a Penguin.

RodB
11-08-2010, 11:01 PM
Some great choices here.... and the New Haven Sharpie is very lovely... I also could suggest one.... Arch Davis's "Laughing Gull" which was designed for a couple of young teenagers to row and sail. It was tremendously successful and is very safe with a floatation tank all along the bottom of the hull. She's easy to build and quite appealing.

http://www.archdavisdesigns.com/davis_laughinggull.html

Good luck with your choice.

RodB

SScoville
11-09-2010, 08:15 AM
I think I know why David wants a 12 footer for his son. He's planning to race him in his Doug Hylan Crabbing Skiff.

Geoff C
11-09-2010, 05:35 PM
Found this online, designed by Joel Welter for the SNAME 5 ply Challenge . Even though 17' long, you can see that the beam is only a little more than 3 feet. I'd tilt up the hiking platforms as it looks like they would drag in the water when heeled over. Rounded stern can be added of course.http://lh6.ggpht.com/_v5_xYzUWOfY/TNnLyXvX7XI/AAAAAAAAAe8/stvijv5Qbmc/NH%20Sharpie.JPG

Boatsmith
11-11-2010, 10:15 AM
Maybe a Whisp, drawn I believe by Steve Redmund. http://www.sredmond.com/index_boat.htm

Songololo
11-11-2010, 10:38 AM
David, what about contacting Doug Hylan in connection with a smaller version of his Chesapeake Crab Skiff...

Matthew L
11-11-2010, 03:52 PM
There are two Bolger designs offered by Dynamite Payson at www.instantboats.com (http://instantboats.com/index.html) that might work: Surf (http://instantboats.com/surf.htm) and Zephyr (http://instantboats.com/zephyr.htm).

Both have very crab skiff-like lines while being very easy to build. Surf also has an appropriate sprit-boomed leg-o'-mutton rig, while Zephyr is lateen rigged. Zephyr, while a full 20' long, would actually be easy to cartop with a little thought and the right setup since you'd only ever have to lift one end at time.

Cheers,

Matthew

Doug Hylan
12-10-2010, 08:58 PM
David, what about contacting Doug Hylan in connection with a smaller version of his Chesapeake Crab Skiff...

I am currently working on a 13' version of the Chesapeake Crab Skiff

Cuyahoga Chuck
12-10-2010, 10:24 PM
At 12 feet you are not going to get a tremdous run of speed
But here are some S&Gs that could fill the bill without resorting to chopping 4 feet off a 16 foot flat bottomed skiff.
http://www.bateau.com/proddetail.php?prod=SH14 -flat- bottomed
http://www.bateau.com/studyplans/C12_study.htm?prod=C12 -vee-bottomed
http://www.bateau.com/proddetail.php?prod=CR13 -vee-bottomed

Terry Haines
12-10-2010, 11:10 PM
A small properly designed flat-bottomed sailboat around 12 x 4 will plane in a capful of wind and provide all the excitement a young lad needs, while still being beamy enough to funcition adequately as a fishing platform. A smaller boat can also be car-topped, if that is a consideration. Pay attention to ease of rigging from within the boat so the sail can be lowered for fishing and raised for the return trip, and provision for rowing.

RodB
12-10-2010, 11:13 PM
Why not choose a boat that was specifically designed for your exact situation... [read the design rationale on the Laughing Gull] for young lads wanting to sail and row... Arch Davis's Laughing Gull has great lines, is easy to build, rows well and sails well... She has a floatation tank contiguous along the entire bottom so she is very safe for young boys... His Penobscot 14 is my favorite... and also does all the same things well. I agree with the comments above... why a 12 footer... its just as much work and will not be as safe and as fast.... and as much fun.

http://www.archdavisdesigns.com/

http://www.archdavisdesigns.com/davis2.html

http://www.archdavisdesigns.com/davis_penobscot14.html

http://www.archdavisdesigns.com/davis_laughinggull.html

RodB

ahp
12-11-2010, 10:27 AM
My wife I sailed the little two masted sharpie that was part of the Mystic Seaport boat livery. She may have been 12 ft LOA, and she was a bit tight. Go a little bigger. Don't build a fantail stern. It is difficult to build and will serve no purpose. Use a transom stern instead.

peterchech
12-11-2010, 05:56 PM
12 ft is an adequate size to mess around in. Look at the summerbreeze sharpie, free plans, only two sheets of ply to build the hull, designer claims he has planed up to 7.5 mph in it. No epoxy necessary if you use a chine log. Won the duckworks design competition a while back. Can be built for 200 bucks and weigh about 70 lbs so easy to cartop.

http://www.simplicityboats.com/SBtrim.jpg

Bruce46
12-11-2010, 06:32 PM
Since no one else has mentioned it, you might want to look at the Core Sound 15. http://www.bandbyachtdesigns.com/cs15.htm It's a modern boat simple to build and rig plus big enough for an adult or two.

Binnacle Bat
12-11-2010, 06:45 PM
As a sailor in extremely late adolescence, and who has sailed Sailfish and Sunfish for more than 50 years, I suspect he will find any 12' skiff booooring.

I vote for the Goat Island Skiff. Plenty of sail area, simple construction. Well sailed, it shouldn't be passed by a Sunfish.

Disclaimer I have not sailed one, nor crossed tacks with one.

Allan
in the hills.