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View Full Version : Restoring an old Norwegian fishing sailing boat.



granouaile
10-25-2010, 06:32 PM
Over the last months I've participated in a few threads here and gotten some very useful advice, now I am attempting to show something of the crazy project I have become involved in when I should really be sitting by the fire knitting socks for my grandchildren. I've found great encourgement here by reading some of the threads of long perseverance and unlikely builders,

There are some pics of my boat on this website

www.surroundedbywater.org

However she looks deceivingly whole in the photos as you will see if you click on this link to have a look at the Hole.

http://surroundedbywater.org/adventure_files/2010_08_Boat/DSCN1558.htm

I have been working on her for a year,last year with a great German builder we did a huge patch further forward -pics on the link above. Then he got his own boat that needed his time and I spent a year looking for someone else who was willing to work in quite difficult conditions, as we are not in a yard but in a mud berth, though with a good platform to work from. Then a few days ago after yet another man told me he'd do the job if the boat were in a boatyard I decided to see what I could do myself with my boyfriend. I know this boat inside out, she is a weird but very strong build, originally of pine on pine. The ribs are haphazhard affairs of short thick lengths held together inside a double skin of very thick planks (2" on the outside and 1 1/2" on the inside).

I have a question about my next stage of work. I have the oak to build new frames but it is heavy and difficult for me to work with. So I am considering Cedar or Yew for the next frames. Can anyone tell me if there are reasons against this? The original frames are pine and mainly still good after 100 years.
A,

philcostello
10-26-2010, 03:29 AM
Looks like a big project but I bet she will be a beauty when she is restored! The oak be ing heavy adds to the balast, I believe it is also stronger. The white oak does not absorb water like the red oak so it is the perfered material. Cedar is a beautiful wood but it tends to be very expensive, double the oak. . These are some general understandings I have come to learn, I am in the middle of building my first boat, here in the US. Others on this forum are far more experienced and knowledgable than me.

granouaile
10-26-2010, 03:47 AM
Thank you Phil. I can get cedar and yew for little more than the cost of oak so price isn't the problem. It's my back I am thinking of and the costs of going to the osteopath could easily make up the difference!
Thank you for the encouragment, much appreciated on a cold, wet October morning!
A.

St.J
10-26-2010, 03:49 AM
I have the oak to build new frames but it is heavy and difficult for me to work with. So I am considering Cedar or Yew for the next frames. Can anyone tell me if there are reasons against this? The original frames are pine and mainly still good after 100 years.
A,

Are you laminating the frames, bending them or sawing them to shape?

Horsemarine
10-26-2010, 08:20 AM
I know Atlantis Adventure very well. I attempted to guide the previous owner in her reconstruction, with, I'm afraid, little success. She (the boat, not the owner!) had spent about ten years standing on legs, with much of her deck off, on the beach in Baltimore. This was a most unpromising start! In rebuilding her, my advice, particularly in framing, was honoured more in the breach than the observance!
I would look hard at breaks in the beam clamp on the port sdide which were very short scarphed, at the engine room layout (I'd hate to have to work in there, especially with a hot engine!) and the rigging fittings, as well as the framing.
That said I think you have the basis of a good boat there, provided you are prepared to spend money. There is nothing wrong with the original pine framing, where it is still sound. This is old growth timber, but look out for the new frames. I nearly attacked one of the "helpers" cutting them with a chain saw in very short, ill fitting lengths! I would not, on any account, use yew in any part of the boat. Irish oak, if available, is as good as English, or American live oak, for those you have to replace.
Good luck!

wizbang 13
10-26-2010, 12:19 PM
The work of manhandling oak frames will get you into shape for sailing her!