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Andrew Craig-Bennett
09-27-2010, 04:04 AM
My mind has been running on making sure that my sprogs don't grow up as little chauvinists, so, on the basis of the proverb common amongst travelling businessmen that "one can face any sort of food that you hosts may throw at you for lunch and dinner, so long as breakfast looks familiar" * I thought we ought to try some non-British breakfasts.

Le petit dejeuner francais is easy to do, and I can rustle up a Dutch type breakfast quite easily too, so we move on to American and German breakfasts and would like to hear other suggestions..

I gave the boys Eggs Benedict a few days ago and they greatly approved of that - what else would go to make up an authentically US breakfast (regional variations encouraged) Crispy bacon, a couple of strawberries, a pitcher of orange juice, coffee and toast served in napkins so it is soggy all come to mind but how does one make hash browns and grits?

Similarly for any other national breakfasts...

(* I confess that despite all those years in China I stil struggle with special congee and pickles at 0700...)

downthecreek
09-27-2010, 04:44 AM
what else would go to make up an authentically US breakfast (regional variations encouraged)


I don't know if it's an authentically US breakfast, but one of the best breakfasts I ever had was at the Yale Club in New York. Strawberries, raspberries, blueberries and blackberries, laid out around a small mountain of excellent natural yoghurt and topped with a good helping of very crisp granola.

Maybe not the ideal breakfast for growing lads - perhaps fruit and yoghurt are more a lady thing ;) But a memorably delicious way to start the day, all the same.

PeterSibley
09-27-2010, 04:59 AM
I don't know if it's an authentically US breakfast, but one of the best breakfasts I ever had was at the Yale Club in New York. Strawberries, raspberries, blueberries and blackberries, laid out around a small mountain of excellent natural yoghurt and topped with a good helping of very crisp granola.

Maybe not the ideal breakfast for growing lads - perhaps fruit and yoghurt are more a lady thing ;) But a memorably delicious way to start the day, all the same.

Yes please ! That sounds just about perfect .

Paul Pless
09-27-2010, 05:18 AM
what else would go to make up an authentically US breakfast (regional variations encouraged)

A very traditional southern breakfast, and one of my favorites is Biscuits and Sawmill Gravy.

Biscuits

Ingredients:

2 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoons sugar
1 tablespoon baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
8 tablespoons butter, cubed
3/4 cup milk
Directions

Preheat oven to 425 degrees.
In a large bowl combine flour, sugar, baking powder and salt together. Cut butter into mixture until it begins to look like cornmeal.
Make a well with flour mixture and slowly add milk into the middle. Knead dough with your fingers and add milk when necessary. Roll out dough onto a lightly floured surface and roll out to desired thickness. Cut with small biscuit cutter.
Butter bottom of skillet and place biscuits in pan. Bake for 12 minutes or until golden brown.



http://recipes.pauladeen.com/images/uploads/biscuits.jpg



Sawmill Gravy

Ingredients
1 pound ground sausage
1/2 medium onion, diced
2 cloves garlic, minced
3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons black pepper
2 cups half-and-half
2 tablespoons butter

Directions

In a large skillet, combine the sausage, onion, and garlic. Cook over medium heat until the sausage is browned and crumbles.

Stir in the flour, salt, and pepper; cook for 1 minute. Gradually stir in the half-and-half. Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly, until the mixture is thickened. Stir in the butter until well blended.

The important part of this recipe is to make it very peppery, lots of course ground black pepper. The butter and cream will try to mute that pepper. The above recipe is a kinda rich one since it actually includes the sauasge, a truly authentic and 'poor man's' version would use just the sausage grease or more likely bacon grease.

I like it served with a side of scrambled eggs.

http://chicagoist.com/attachments/chicagoist_chuck/2006_11_gravy.jpg


Unfortunately I'm on an oatmeal for breakfast diet. I don't recommend it.

Andrew Craig-Bennett
09-27-2010, 05:25 AM
I sense this is going to be a good thread! Thanks for the recipe, Paul - very small boy friendly - I fear I am going to need help with the biscuits also - I have cookery books with "American sections" but they seem to be devoted to cakes!

martin schulz
09-27-2010, 05:31 AM
Le petit dejeuner francais is easy to do, and I can rustle up a Dutch type breakfast quite easily too, so we move on to American and German breakfasts and would like to hear other suggestions..

A french breakfast is indeed an easy one - a bowl with coffee&milk and a cigarette, perhaps a croissant to dip into the bowl.

Bu I wonder what you think a German breakfast looks like, Andrew.

Paul Pless
09-27-2010, 05:35 AM
I sense this is going to be a good thread! I think so too.


I fear I am going to need help with the biscuits also I added a recipe for those to my original post.

Andrew Craig-Bennett
09-27-2010, 05:47 AM
A french breakfast is indeed an easy one - a bowl with coffee&milk and a cigarette, perhaps a croissant to dip into the bowl.

Bu I wonder what you think a German breakfast looks like, Andrew.

My experience is essentially hotel-derived, of course...I think Frühstück might involve bread probably in the form of a fresh roll or two, ham, sausage, some cheese, muesli, probably with fresh fruit, a boiled egg and coffee?

coelacanth2
09-27-2010, 06:05 AM
Local diner's "Farmer's Breakfast"; 2 eggs any style, 2 pancakes, hash browned "taters, breakfast meat (2 or3 slices bacon, slab of ham , scrapple, or sausage (links (2) or patties) and white or wheat toast. That will keep you fueled for a morning of reasonably heavy work. Hash browns I do by having the potatoes baked or boiled the night before. Heat grease in an iron skillet, cook a bit of onion and green bell pepper 'till just getting soft, add the potato which has previously been sectioned into bite - sized bits and stir around until well heated and turning brown, perhaps a bit crispy here and there Ideally the grease is left over from the bacon or sausage.
If you cam procure it, real maple syrup is a worthy addition.

Milo Christensen
09-27-2010, 06:09 AM
Hashbrowns are mo' bettah as Potatoes O'Brien:

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3036/2742852872_ff6fcbab1f.jpg

Potatoes O'Brien, slice of fried ham, two eggs over easy, whole wheat toast, strawberry jam, ketchup on the side for the potatoes. There are debates about the timing of adding the green onions and whether or not diced green pepper belongs.

Though you could start with the potatoes o'brien and add sweet yellow onion, green pepper, diced ham, pour the beaten egg mixture over and make a Denver omelette.

Milo Christensen
09-27-2010, 06:15 AM
Been a long, long time since anybody has served me scrapple. Very regional, though fried corn meal mush comes close and is a lot easier to make. One part yellow corn meal, four parts water, bring to a boil, put in small loaf pan, refrigerate until morning, slice, fry. Serve golden brown with butter and syrup.

PeterSibley
09-27-2010, 06:36 AM
I'll stick with the berrys !

martin schulz
09-27-2010, 06:39 AM
My experience is essentially hotel-derived, of course...I think Frühstück might involve bread probably in the form of a fresh roll or two, ham, sausage, some cheese, muesli, probably with fresh fruit, a boiled egg and coffee?

Hey not bad!
There are of course variations since you won't find fish-salad in Bavaria while "we" very seldom have Bavarian veal-sausages for breakfast.

But you go the Frühstück essentials rounded up pretty good. Perhaps one would also provide jelly, honey, curd cheese (as spread under jelly/honey). Bread rolls are a must! Coffee or tea and very often a glas of orange juice.

But how about a Danish morgnmad (morningmeal) - frokost (breakfast) is eaten around noon?

Morgnmad is essentially very scanty consisting usually only of a bowl cornflakes or, if you want it more "Danish" Ymer with Ymerdrys.
Ymer is a danish invention. Its some sort of yoghurt/curd cheese and is usually served with Ymerdrys, which is roasted rye-bread crumb with brown sugar.

For the "real" breakfast/frokost you will have bread, often crispbread and a confuding amout of fish-salad (hering with currysauce, hering with mustard sauce, makarel in tomatosauce...). You will have plain milk with it.

elf
09-27-2010, 07:20 AM
My mind whirls with the options for "American" breakfast. It really depends on which culture you're interested in.

As for eggs benedict. I've never even imagined it as American or anything else.

Here's a rural and suburban American breakfast:

Eggs scrambled with a little milk to make them watery - yes. Eggs fried sunny side up in butter or sausage fat - yes. Eggs poached if you live at home - yeah, maybe. But eggs with anything added to them? No.

On top of that high cholesteral offering you will find white or "wheat" squishybread toast with butter and jam/jelly, white flour pancakes with whole milk in the batter (a stack of at least 3 around 6" in diameter), hash browns and 1 or 2 sweet pork sausage links about 2.5" long. Between the pancakes will be butter and possible some sort of jam and on top preferably real maple syrup but if you go into a diner or ordinary restaurant you'll find fake maple syrup and/or honey.

On the side generally coffee with sugar and half and half (or milk). At least 2 cups. And possibly a tiny thimble-sized (well I admit I exaggerate the tininess) glass of orange juice from concentrate preferably without pulp and supplemented with artificial color.

From that meal most Americans then go sit in an office in front of a computer for 8 hours.

Alternatively:
A couple of those toaster strudel thingies popped into the toaster and eaten while running out the door. A big cup of coffee with sugar and whitener.

or:
A styrofoam bowl with at least a cup of corn syrup sweetened and artificially fruit or cocoa flavored dry cereal made from puffed or flaked things that once were grains, reinforced with an array of vitamins since those were all removed during the process of reducing the original grains to the powder they need to be to puff or flake them. Splashed on that enough 1% or 2% milk (Americans buy it by the gallon) to reduce the cereal to something approaching mud texture. The "cereal" comes with a colorful cardboard wrapping around the bowl and a tamper-proof paper cover over the mouth of the bowl. The tamper-proof cover is lined with aluminum foil which cannot be separated for recycling and lightly hot glued to the edge of the styro. This sort of breakfast will often be seen in the hands of people the size and ages of your sprogs as they rush for the school bus to get taken to school. (In my town it is illegal to allow a child under 5th grade to walk to school. In fact, parents mostly drive their kids the quarter mile to the bus stop and wait with SUV engines running for the bus to appear.)

Keith Wilson
09-27-2010, 07:20 AM
what else would go to make up an authentically US breakfast (regional variations encouraged)Eggs Benedict (in my experience) is normally a restaurant meal eaten about 10:30 AM; too ponderous for a real breakfast. Soggy toast served in napkins is a mistake, not a traditional American breakfast food.

Hash browns: Peel and boil potatoes. Put them in the refrigerator to get them very cold. Chop 'em up small. Put them back in the refrigerator to get cold again, Fry them in a fairly thin layer in hot oil so they get brown and a bit cripsy on the outside; salt to taste. Lots of work, also generally a restaurant thing. Take your statins.

Breakfast of the gods: Bagels (garlic bagels if you can get them), cream cheese, a slice of raw Vidalia onion, and nova lox (cured salmon, look here (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lox)) to the limit of your budget.

Traditional breakfast dish at my house: A couple of slices of bacon, cooked not too crispy. Break up the bacon and cook it together with scrambled eggs, a little runny or at least not cooked too hard . Roll the mixture up in a warm flour tortilla with La Victoria extra hot salsa or the local equivalent. Eat. Contemplate the essential goodness of the universe (or the benevolence of the deity, if you prefer).

Elf's being a little sarcastic. Does anyone actually eat cereal out of those styrofoam miracles of modern packaging technology? And packaged orange juice (in the carton, not from concentrate) has improved immeasurably in the past ten years or so.

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
09-27-2010, 07:40 AM
Perhaps the range of English breakfasts would stand examining

You can still get "Sunny D" in some outlandish colours, and Hash browns - in Iceland.


One Welsh breakfast would appear to be a Northern Irish breakfast + Black Pudding and served in an enormous bun - oh, and Tea.

Canoez
09-27-2010, 07:40 AM
Some good places to look would be diner menus. The "greasy spoon" usually has most items found in a cooked breakfast here.

Pancakes served at breakfast seem to be a mostly American thing as are waffles. As Paul points out, it's pretty regional.

Milo Christensen
09-27-2010, 07:54 AM
Ah yes, the all American breakfast burrito. Needs to have veggies in it like a Denver omelette, except crumbled sausage instead of ham. A dollop of medium salsa. To cheese or not to cheese?

oznabrag
09-27-2010, 08:01 AM
Recipe for Grits: Make polenta.

If you want to get fancy, add a bunch of grated cheddar, or shrimp or garlic (definitely garlic) or practically anything!

Syed
09-27-2010, 08:02 AM
Paratha + Shami kebab + Kashmiri tea

http://www.cuisineonline.pk/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/Paratha.jpg

http://www.evernewrecipes.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/Shammi-Kebab-Recipe.jpg

http://pakistanifoodrecipies.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/09/gulabi-chai.jpg

Draketail
09-27-2010, 08:15 AM
So, from the South (Virginia):

Any time I want a comfort breakfast:

a large slab of country ham (Smithfield would be the perfect brand)
otherwise any overly salty, smoke and pepper cured ham will do
(Italian proscuito and German wesphalian ham are close)
2 eggs over medium, fried in the leftover grease from the ham
biscuits as shown in post #4, with strawberry or blackberry preserves and butter
and...stone ground yellow grits, cooked to the consistency of rice pudding, topped in butter
(For some unknown reason, Marylanders serve grits at the consistency of very thin porridge. I don't understand)
And, if the idea of grits makes you queasy, just call it Polenta and it moves up market. It's the same corn meal.

Almost forgot the cup of strong, black coffee
And, the extra coffee can be used to make redeye gravy to further enhance the grits of so desired....

Enjoy!

oznabrag
09-27-2010, 08:18 AM
Ah yes, the all American breakfast burrito. Needs to have veggies in it like a Denver omelette, except crumbled sausage instead of ham. A dollop of medium salsa. To cheese or not to cheese?

Hold on just a second there pardner! A 'breakfast burrito' is only available from Mc Donald's and such like. Strictly speaking, a burrito is completely wrapped on both ends and has only one or two ingredients, like 'beef and bean' or 'carne guisada' with the vegetables and sauce on the outside. In other words a package of entree.

Here in the civilized world, we eat breakfast tacos. They typically contain scrambled eggs and hashbrowns or eggs and sausage (chorizo!) or pretty much anything you might like for breakfast, and are rolled with either one or both ends open. they are always served with salsa, usually in your choice of red or green, but the type of salsa available is an almost infinite local variable.

Canoez
09-27-2010, 08:20 AM
Soft taco, no? Like Huevos Rancheros?

oznabrag
09-27-2010, 08:24 AM
Soft taco, no? Like Huevos Rancheros?

Soft taco, si!

i forgot to mention 'Migas', which is essentially leftover nachos scrambled with eggs. Awesome! The tortilla chips make for a very interesting texture.

Milo Christensen
09-27-2010, 08:25 AM
I defer to the master. But aren't tacos made with crispy corn tortillas in a U? And aren't burritos soft flour tortillas, rolled, - quibbling about open or closed seems to be just that - quibbling. I do like to close the bottom end so the salsa doesn't leak out all over my lap while I'm driving. That, of course, is something that Andrew's missed - American breakfast is now eaten in the car.

oznabrag
09-27-2010, 08:35 AM
I defer to the master. But aren't tacos made with crispy corn tortillas in a U? And aren't burritos soft flour tortillas, rolled, - quibbling about open or closed seems to be just that - quibbling. I do like to close the bottom end so the salsa doesn't leak out all over my lap while I'm driving. That, of course, is something that Andrew's missed - American breakfast is now eaten in the car.

The name 'burrito' means 'small, equine pack animal', and it refers to the fact that the entree is enclosed. They weigh in at close to a pound, and usually require a knife and fork. As noted above, there are both soft and crispy tacos, and they are just a few bites. A 'taco' is also a carpenter's shim or wedge so a taco is just a snack, really.

I had a friend take me to Taco Bell the other day, and he advised me to try this taco (I can't remember what they call it), and even though it was pretty wretched eating it represented a revolution: They heat a tortilla, spread it with refried beans, and wrap a crispy taco with it. That way, the crunchy taco shell sticks to the beans, and stays in your hand, not in your lap.

varadero
09-27-2010, 08:52 AM
Spanish breakfast is a cured ham bocadillo (bagette) washed down with a cold beer, followed with an expresso with a shot of brandy or whisky added. I must admit, I do not follow the local culture as regards to "desayuna". I would not reccomend this for the kids either.

Milo Christensen
09-27-2010, 08:58 AM
. . . I had a friend take me to Taco Bell the other day, and he advised me to try this taco (I can't remember what they call it), and even though it was pretty wretched eating it represented a revolution: They heat a tortilla, spread it with refried beans, and wrap a crispy taco with it. That way, the crunchy taco shell sticks to the beans, and stays in your hand, not in your lap.

Yes, you can make a great taco this way at home. Just buy the smaller flour tortillas. Everything Taco Bell makes is not fit to even be fed to their symbolic dog. Folks should realize just how wretched Taco Bell is.

But we digress, back to breakfast, I've just had my multi-grain toaster waffles with fake butter and fake maple syrup.

skipper68
09-27-2010, 09:00 AM
Canned corned beef hash,fried crispy,with two sunny side up eggs on top. A side of Italian toast. Yummy

martin schulz
09-27-2010, 09:02 AM
Spanish breakfast is a cured ham bocadillo (bagette) washed down with a cold beer, followed with an expresso with a shot of brandy or whisky added. I must admit, I do not follow the local culture as regards to "desayuna". I would not reccomend this for the kids either.

Ahh - bocadillo with a glas Sagres and afterwards a carachillo - muy bien!
But what about those churros I have often enjoyd with a bowl of hot chocolade?

Andrew Craig-Bennett
09-27-2010, 09:30 AM
Paratha + Shami kebab + Kashmiri tea

http://www.cuisineonline.pk/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/Paratha.jpg

http://www.evernewrecipes.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/Shammi-Kebab-Recipe.jpg

http://pakistanifoodrecipies.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/09/gulabi-chai.jpg

Definitely a contender there, Syed. May have to ask Alex's friend Sayful over to help with the finer details!

JimD
09-27-2010, 09:33 AM
I like to make bran cakes. Start with whole wheat pancake mix. Add bran.

Andrew Craig-Bennett
09-27-2010, 09:36 AM
For the record, this is just what I do NOT WANT for breakfast:

http://taidaexchange.files.wordpress.com/2007/11/congee.jpg

Special congee with unidentified bits of pig and pickles

paladin
09-27-2010, 09:53 AM
Pate Au Cheux and French press coffee.....

Biscuits, breakfast sausage and coffee/butter/preserves.......

Fresh waffles with fruit and maple syrup

scrambled eggs, sausage/bacon/ham, biscuits and coffee (or milk and orange juice)

Hot sticky rice and fresh mango.......

TomF
09-27-2010, 10:17 AM
What would a Canadian breakfast be? Dunno ACB - are you looking for actual breakfasts, or fantasy breakfasts?

Most mornings in most average Canadian houses, probably cold cereal and/or a couple of slices of whole-wheat toast ... with jam or peanut butter. Maybe half a grapefruit too. Or on cold mornings, some oatmeal + raisins, with milk and brown sugar (we add cinnamon too). Glass of OJ and a couple of cups of decent coffee. In our house, my kids will often want leftover chili for breakfast, if there's any in the fridge. Or a bagel with cream cheese.

But what do we cook up for a special family breakfast on Saturday mornings? Oh, prolly 2 eggs somehow (over easy, scrambled, sunny-side up) or some kind of omelette (we add cheddar, mushrooms, green/red peppers, maybe ham), ham or bacon (or less usually, sausage), and a few buttermilk pancakes with actual maple syrup. Or hash browns, but then where do you put the maple syrup? Sasha and I like smoked fish too, but the kids run screaming from the kitchen. I pretend to cook Heuvos Rancheros sometimes, but I don't get it anything like right.

In restaurants? Eggs benedict, or various flourishes added to what's above. Maybe some muesli with yogurt too instead of hash browns.

What we don't do anywhere - can't conceive of doing - is prepare the toast beforehand and leave it in one of those quintessetially British toast-holding-racks to get dry, cold, and unpalatable.

Andrew Craig-Bennett
09-27-2010, 10:27 AM
Pate Au Cheux and French press coffee.....

Biscuits, breakfast sausage and coffee/butter/preserves.......

Fresh waffles with fruit and maple syrup

scrambled eggs, sausage/bacon/ham, biscuits and coffee (or milk and orange juice)

Hot sticky rice and fresh mango.......

As served in the Caravelle Hotel, or indeed in the Rex, these days, but probably not when the CIA were there! ;)

Andrew Craig-Bennett
09-27-2010, 10:30 AM
What would a Canadian breakfast be? Dunno ACB - are you looking for actual breakfasts, or fantasy breakfasts?



Let' say -a Saturday morning breakfast - although I am antiquated enough not to let anyone go off to school without something more than cereal and fruit juice inside them.

Milo Christensen
09-27-2010, 10:35 AM
. . . What we don't do anywhere - can't conceive of doing - is prepare the toast beforehand and leave it in one of those quintessetially British toast-holding-racks to get dry, cold, and unpalatable.

It's so dry you can cut your lip on it if you're not careful to bite it carefully, and just horrible to eat the English misconception of toast with a hangover, such a crunching noise, arrrrrghhhhh! I still don't get the soggy toast in napkin thing, no, never, ever had it served that way, anywhere, and I've been everywhere.

paladin
09-27-2010, 10:38 AM
uh....actually....Andrew......those were some of my favorites. I had to have several conversations with the lady in the kitchen before we got the waffles alright. The problem was real maple syrup, and all we could snitch from the exchange was Aunt Jemima "maple" syrup...

TomF
09-27-2010, 10:41 AM
Let' say -a Saturday morning breakfast - although I am antiquated enough not to let anyone go off to school without something more than cereal and fruit juice inside them.Saturday mornings here are Farmer's Market day, and when my son busks there ... we let him buy us a late breakfast.

Fresh eggs, some really good thick-sliced bacon or artisan-smoked sausage (we've got a lot of good meat producers at our market!), thick sliced rye toast. And something to pour maple syrup on ... buttermilk or buckwheat pancakes, french toast, waffles ... Orange juice squeezed in front of you.

Or alternatively, there's a huge lineup every Market day for the folks selling samosas ... spicy beef or spicy chicken ones please.

Ian McColgin
09-27-2010, 10:47 AM
When I feel like defying the doc, I make my hash fries from potatoes that got thin sliced and a little boil while I cooked up lots of bacon without draining the grease. Then while the bacon matures over paper towels, I toss the potatoes through a collander to shake out the water and drop them in the bacon fat to fry to completion. If you have sliced and diced some onion and green pepper, so much the better. When nice and brown, it's time for them to come out, let the bacon fat drain off while you fry some eggs, and then put all three - bacon eggs and hash browns - on a plate. Who needs toast?

Another classic is steak and eggs. Here's one place you can favor a cheap cut of beef. Thin slice and deep fry in bacon fat fast and hot - or if you want a pretense of heart health use a non-meat oil in a hot wok - and let that stettle for as long as it takes to fry the eggs. It's well to have done your hash browns before you do the steak slices - same pan and oil for all three but it's perfectly ok to either drain off the fat for the eggs or to deep fry which gives a whole new and firmer aura to sunny side up.

All these high everything - fat, protien, carbo, calorie - American farm breakfasts are designed for farmers who's old time (1930 or before) work day could actually burn off all that stuff, really needed it. LBJ kept to a healthy diet while president but returned to his beloved Texas steak and bacon and eggs after, which is why he so quickly arrived at his fatal heart attack.

downthecreek
09-27-2010, 10:49 AM
What we don't do anywhere - can't conceive of doing - is prepare the toast beforehand and leave it in one of those quintessetially British toast-holding-racks to get dry, cold, and unpalatable.

You don't want to prepare it beforehand - naturally. But when you take the hot toast out from under the grill or as soon as it pops up from the toaster - then a proper toast rack is the best place for it. No doubt about that.

Toast bread needs to be thick so that it comes out crunchy on the outside and still soft on the inside. Crisp all the way though is fine for other occasions, but not breakfast. The butter needs to go on straight away, so that it sinks in a bit. Then, of course, there needs to be good marmalade. That's for breakfast of course. After a long, chilly winter walk there needs to be good raspberry or strawberry jam - preferably home made. Or my next door neighbour's honey, of course.

Not that I ever eat any of that, mind you. Fruit and yoghurt is right for breakfast and I never seem to get around to toast, even though I am much given to long, chilly winter walks.

One much neglected breakfast treat is eggbread. Now that is a wonderful dish. Of course it also pops up in the guise of pain perdu, which lends itself to many different flavourings. Eggbread and bacon sandwiches at dawn off the Roches Douvres (in the western English Channel, on the way to Britanny) Now that's a worthy breakfast in a fine setting. :)

downthecreek
09-27-2010, 10:56 AM
http://www.evernewrecipes.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/Shammi-Kebab-Recipe.jpg



Not being a very breakfasty sort of person, most of the suggestions leave me cold. But that's got my mouth watering! :)

elf
09-27-2010, 10:56 AM
I was given a sterling silver toast rack for a wedding present back in 1968. It's held my sorted bills every since.

Why would anyone want cold toast?

elf
09-27-2010, 10:57 AM
One much neglected breakfast treat is eggbread. Now that is a wonderful dish. Of course it also pops up in the guise of pain perdu, which lends itself to many different flavourings. Eggbread and bacon sandwiches at dawn off the Roches Douvres (in the western English Channel, on the way to Britanny) Now that's a worthy breakfast in a fine setting. :)

You mean French Toast, don't you?

Scott Rosen
09-27-2010, 10:58 AM
I don't think there is a quintessential American breakfast.

9 days of 10 I have fresh berries or other fruit with plain yogurt and wholegrain cereal or granola. Lately, my cereal of choice is Oat Bran Flakes by 365 brand (store brand for Whole Foods).

Rarely, I'll have a couple of eggs over easy on whole grain bread with butter.

Even more rarely, I'll go for the bagel, cream cheese and smoked salmon as Keith described.

downthecreek
09-27-2010, 11:00 AM
You mean French Toast, don't you?

Er, no. I mean eggbread. It may or may not be similar to, or the same as, a dish you call French Toast, but as far as I'm concerned, it's eggbread. |:)

downthecreek
09-27-2010, 11:03 AM
Why would anyone want cold toast?

Each tae their ane taste, as the auld wife said when she kissed the coo. The toast rack ensures that the toast doesn't go soggy. It only goes cold if you leave it to go cold........

TomF
09-27-2010, 11:05 AM
Er, no. I mean eggbread. It may or may not be similar to, or the same as, a dish you call French Toast, but as far as I'm concerned, it's eggbread. |:)Hmm. On this side of the pond, "French Toast" means thickly cut bread, soaked in beaten egg/milk (maybe with vanilla added), fried in butter, and served with any number of nice things on top. Maple syrup, to be sure, but often lots of berries and (in restaurants) whipped cream.

What's eggbread?

TomF
09-27-2010, 11:06 AM
Eggbread, in my family, is challah.Here too.

downthecreek
09-27-2010, 11:16 AM
What's eggbread?

Really, it's a savoury version of what you have described. Egg, a bit of milk and seasoning. I like to cook it a little crisp on the outside and finish it off for a few minutes in the oven. Excellent on its own or with good bacon.

The sweet versions are what I would call pain perdu, although the flavourings might be a bit different. The version I'm used to (learned in France) is best made with loose textured, slightly stale French bread and is often flavoured with a little sugar and a little cheap alcohol, such as marc or brandy and, perhaps some spice like cinnamon. Generally served with a sprinkling of sugar and, perhaps, some fruit preserve or fresh berries. Excellent way of using up yesterday's bread. Things like maple syrup would probably be a bit too sweet for me and I think cream would be over egging the pudding, if you see what I mean. In France pain perdu is really a very simple and, in some ways, quite an austere dish - but delicious.

It's not very breakfasty, but I do like many of those various sweet dishes based on bread (or brioche)- Queen of Puddings, Bread and Butter Pudding, Summer Pudding, Rigadon....... very satisfying.

Incidentally, I do prefer to make toast under the grill, rather than in a toaster, so maybe the toast rack is more use to me than to someone who is catching it as it pops out of the toaster. It only goes cold if you let it. :)

BarnacleGrim
09-27-2010, 12:13 PM
I love the look of the breakfast in Syed's post! Nothing like a bit of spiciness to make you go, and warm you right up inside when it's cold out. I also need to try all the different types of chai of India and Pakistan, what they serve here is pretty bloody awful. Swedes simply can't drink tea, let alone with milk and spices.

I like Eggs Benedict, and American pancakes with maple syrup too. But my absolute favourite breakfast is the French breakfast. Un bol de café au lait, une baguette de pain, du confiture (je préfère au goyave) et finalement, un pain au chocolat! Impeccable!

Peerie Maa
09-27-2010, 12:21 PM
Eggy bread, no milk in the mix, fried and eaten as a bottom layer under fried bacon and or sautéed mushrooms.

Another way is to cut a circle out of a slice. Then fry the bread and when ready drop an egg into the hole to fry.

bobbys
09-27-2010, 12:43 PM
The doctor told me if im a good boy and eat my Oatmeal for 5 days the 6th i can have fried potato's, I do not bother with sausage or bacon much i just lust after the taters, Yukon golds fried in olive earl.

If doing roofing i can go to only 3 days with horse food then have my taters...

I do poached eggs with toast to mix it up and walk on the wild side.

halflin
09-27-2010, 02:24 PM
ye canna start the day withoot yer parritch!

Tak them staunin up wi a wee puckle cream (in a separate bowlie)

Enjoy.

troutman
09-27-2010, 02:29 PM
Last time i had breakfast at the Harvard Club we had scones and quince marmalade.......mummy had tea.

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
09-27-2010, 02:30 PM
Or - for thosewho don't take cream - skirley.


Sixty posts and still no mention of the haddock Kedgeree - or the humble kipper.

Andrew Craig-Bennett
09-27-2010, 02:44 PM
ye canna start the day withoot yer parritch!

Tak them staunin up wi a wee puckle cream (in a separate bowlie)

Enjoy.

Definitely the purist's approach, which I am told is practised to this day in the grander country houses of Scotland
, where not only is parritch consumed standing up but walking about.

http://www.goldenspurtle.com/

But to my mind the official Scottish breakfast should start with porage, continue with Finnan Haddie* and conclude with a bap
, perhaps involving marmalade.

Capitalised because it is now an EU official thing and mere smoked haddock from anywhere else is Not The Thing.

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
09-27-2010, 02:54 PM
.... and conclude with a bap
, perhaps involving marmalade.
...

The "Bap" should be an Aberdeen Buttery (rowie).



If you would eat well in England, you must eat breakfast three times a day.

Andrew Craig-Bennett
09-27-2010, 02:57 PM
Thank you for the correction.

I assume that as regards porage, we have in mind steel cut oats, soaked overnight in thrice their volume of water, with a little salt?

What with the making of the baps, the Scottish breakfast begins the night before, so far as the cook is concerned!

downthecreek
09-27-2010, 03:16 PM
Last time i had breakfast at the Harvard Club we had scones and quince marmalade.......mummy had tea.

Harvard should know better. Scones for breakfast, forsooth. Scones are perfectly correct with mummy's tea - but ONLY AT TEATIME!

Tut tut tut. These colonials...... (I bet they pronounced them to rhyme with "stones". I wouldn't put anything past Harvard.......... :))

Scott Rosen
09-27-2010, 03:39 PM
Thank you for the correction.

I assume that as regards porage, we have in mind steel cut oats, soaked overnight in thrice their volume of water, with a little salt?

Steel cut oats! In the US we know them as steel cut oats. :d In the winter, I have them about once a week. Occassionally, I'll have them for dinner. We don't soak them. We just cook them up in the morning for 30 to 40 minutes. Serve with butter and maple syrup, sometimes some bluberries. The best!

downthecreek
09-27-2010, 03:47 PM
The last time I had scones (rhymed with johns) .

Good man! :D

Curtism
09-27-2010, 03:56 PM
This is a fairly traditional southern breakfast in Florida. I'm not sure if it something that would make the acceptable list for a couple of young fellows, though you never know. Anymore it's something more likely to be served in a breakfast place for locals tourists and old die hard Crackers.

Freshwater catfish breaded with corn meal and pan fried, eggs, grits, buttermilk biscuits and some sort of melon/fruit or tomato slices.

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3626/3377402306_269c5c9596.jpg

There was a place in Connecticut that served a seafood hash, sort of like corned beef but with clams, fish and lobster mixed in with the potatoes. I had it once about twenty five years ago and it stands proud as one of my most memorable breakfast experiences. Maybe some of our New England contingent can expound on how its made? I've never seen it here in the south, sadly.

Curtis

chas
09-27-2010, 04:04 PM
"...and still no mention of the haddock Kedgeree - or the humble kipper" - nor of black coffee and last night's pizza, staples of a teen boy's diet. / Jim

bobbys
09-27-2010, 04:05 PM
Jersey breakfast..

Pork roll

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pork_roll#mw-head), search (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pork_roll#p-search)
For the sewing implement, see Tailor's ham (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tailor%27s_ham).
For the Vietnamese item sold at bakeries in Australia and the United States often called a pork roll, see Bánh mì (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B%C3%A1nh_m%C3%AC).
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f0/Taylor_pork_roll_slices_on_pkg.JPG/250px-Taylor_pork_roll_slices_on_pkg.JPG (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Taylor_pork_roll_slices_on_pkg.JPG) http://bits.wikimedia.org/skins-1.5/common/images/magnify-clip.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Taylor_pork_roll_slices_on_pkg.JPG)
A 4-slice box of Taylor brand pork roll.


Pork roll is a type of sausage (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sausage)-like meat product commonly available in and around New Jersey (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Jersey) and Philadelphia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philadelphia). In North Jersey (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Jersey) it is usually called Taylor Ham.[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pork_roll#cite_note-forumthread-0) The product, as it is made today, was developed in 1856[2] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pork_roll#cite_note-saved-1) by John Taylor (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Taylor_%28Taylor_Ham%29) of Trenton, New Jersey (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trenton,_New_Jersey), though several firms produce their own versions.
Contents

[hide (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pork_roll#)]


1 Origin and description (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pork_roll#Origin_and_description)
2 Preparation (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pork_roll#Preparation)

2.1 Jersey Breakfast (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pork_roll#Jersey_Breakfast)

3 Brand names (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pork_roll#Brand_names)
4 In popular culture (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pork_roll#In_popular_culture)
5 References (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pork_roll#References)
6 External links (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pork_roll#External_links)

[edit (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Pork_roll&action=edit&section=1)] Origin and description

A similar product, packed minced ham, may have been produced at the time of the Battle of Trenton (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Trenton).[2] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pork_roll#cite_note-saved-1)
Taylor kept the recipe for the product he created in 1856 secret. George Washington Case, a farmer and butcher from nearby Belle Mead, New Jersey (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Belle_Mead,_New_Jersey) created his own recipe for pork roll in 1870. Case's was reportedly packaged in corn husks.[2] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pork_roll#cite_note-saved-1)
Taylor originally called his product "Taylor's Prepared Ham",[3] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pork_roll#cite_note-1910case-2) but was forced to change the name after the Pure Food and Drug Act (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pure_Food_and_Drug_Act) of 1906 was passed, since the product did not meet the new legal definition of "ham (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ham#United_States)". The new name was "Pork Roll" and it was marketed as both "Taylor's Pork Roll" and "Trenton Pork Roll". Competitors marketed products with similar names like "Rolled Pork" and "Trenton style Pork Roll" and were sued by Taylor. A 1910 legal case ruled that the words "Pork Roll" could not be trademarked.[3] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pork_roll#cite_note-1910case-2)
Although the product is widely consumed and enjoyed, it resists accurate description.[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pork_roll#cite_note-forumthread-0)[4] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pork_roll#cite_note-farkleberries-3) Some people compare the taste and/or texture to SPAM (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spam_%28food%29), Treet (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treet), bologna (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bologna), mild salami (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salami), smoked summer sausage (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Summer_sausage), or US-style Canadian bacon (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Back_bacon). In 1910 it was described as "a food article made of pork, packed in a cylindrical cotton sack or bag in such form that it could be quickly prepared for cooking by slicing without removal from the bag."[3] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pork_roll#cite_note-1910case-2)
Pork roll is generally sold in 1, 1.5, and 3 lb. unsliced rolls packed in cotton bag, as well as 6 oz. boxes containing 4, 6, or 8 slices. Larger rolls and packages are available for food service (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Food_service) customers. It is also sold at delicatessens (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delicatessen), diners (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diner), lunch stands and food trucks (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Food_truck) in the region. It has also been a staple in public school cafeterias in New Jersey.[4] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pork_roll#cite_note-farkleberries-3)
[edit (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Pork_roll&action=edit&section=2)] Preparation

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/ee/Pork_roll_egg_cheese_sand_readytoeat.JPG/220px-Pork_roll_egg_cheese_sand_readytoeat.JPG (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Pork_roll_egg_cheese_sand_readytoeat.JPG) http://bits.wikimedia.org/skins-1.5/common/images/magnify-clip.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Pork_roll_egg_cheese_sand_readytoeat.JPG)
Pork roll, egg, & cheese sandwich, a.k.a "Jersey Breakfast"


The product is generally eaten sliced and pan-fried or grilled. A common practice is to slice three cuts from the outer edges inwards about 3/4 inch to an inch towards the center, evenly spaced around the circumference.[5] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pork_roll#cite_note-4) These cuts prevent the pork roll from curling up in the middle, which causes it to cook unevenly. With these cuts, the cooked slices have become known by many different names such as fireman's badges, pac-man bacon, and Lauter meat.
Though typically eaten as part of a sandwich, pork roll can also be used in many other recipes.[6] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pork_roll#cite_note-5)[7] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pork_roll#cite_note-6) Depending on the type of sandwich and the your location within the region, popular condiments and toppings include salt (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salt), pepper (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_pepper), ketchup (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ketchup), mustard (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mustard), lettuce (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lettuce), and tomato (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tomato).
[edit (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Pork_roll&action=edit&section=3)] Jersey Breakfast

A popular breakfast sandwich (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breakfast_sandwich) in the region made with pork roll is known as the Jersey Breakfast,[8] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pork_roll#cite_note-7)[9] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pork_roll#cite_note-8)[10] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pork_roll#cite_note-9), a "Pork Roll, Egg, and Cheese", or a "Taylor Ham, Egg, and Cheese." The more widely available Bacon, egg and cheese sandwich (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bacon,_egg_and_cheese_sandwich) is very similar. A Jersey Breakfast always contains pork roll, typically served with american cheese (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_cheese) on a hard roll (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hard_roll). It is a staple of many delis, diners, bakeries, and breakfast spots in New Jersey. In Philadelphia, the hard roll is commonly replaced with the locally ubiquitous "long roll" used fo

AussieBarney
09-27-2010, 05:05 PM
For thirty five years I have had what my father described as a legionaires breakfast " A cup of black coffee and two hours of hard work" As the mongrel was wont to say "makes a man of you"

oznabrag
09-27-2010, 05:09 PM
For thirty five years I have had what my father described as a legionaires breakfast " A cup of black coffee and two hours of hard work" As the mongrel was wont to say "makes a man of you"

It also encourages the development of Diabetes.

Shang
09-27-2010, 05:16 PM
Paratha + Shami kebab + Kashmiri tea



In years gone by I was making documentary films in India, one of which had to do with traditional recipies. We were filming a sequence about Masala Dosa as a breakfast dish. I had skipped breakfast that morning...I ended up drooling on the viewfinder of the camera...

http://lh4.ggpht.com/_ebBklahecdY/SSPXZUBrO-I/AAAAAAAAAYo/Depd5ukNK8k/s800/10.jpg

seanz
09-27-2010, 05:16 PM
It also encourages the development of Diabetes.

I think you'll find that you now have Barney's complete attention..........


As I am following a policy of trying really, really hard to be nice, I try to stay off ACB's threads......but this is about the best interests of his children, so I'm just trying to help.
:)
Andrew, you have to try out the congee.....you might not like it.....they might and should at least know what it tastes like.



Now I'm off for breakfast at Syed's.
;):D

For the record, I like porridge (instant, no I don't care) with banana......but there's less phafffing about with toast and honey, so that's what I usually have.

switters
09-27-2010, 05:21 PM
mon-fri: healthy crap my doctor says I should eat like nutrigrain bar and yogurt, occasional breakfast burrito snuck once a week. A proper breakfast burito has egg, chorizo, cheeze and some salsa hot enough to feel the burn at both ends. Wrapped in a flour tortilla. potatoes (rancho) is optional but good.

cold pizza sat morning before heading to the shop/lake/shooting range

Sun, hashbrowns, biscuits and gravy, ham steak or bacon, two fried eggs, sourdough toast. Often eaten as a brunch after fishing/hiking early.

AnalogKid
09-27-2010, 05:49 PM
+1 for Syed's breakfast!

My dad hails from the outskirts of Glasgow and his idea of a cooked breakfast if bacon, eggs and tattie scones. My mum can make the tattie scones but prefers to buy them, unfortunately I've never seen them for sale in NZ so I better ask her for the recipe.

One of my favourite breakfasts from holidays is from Turkey, and consisted of a simple selection of black olives, fresh tomatoes, greasy cheese (a bit like a mild to mid cheddar that gives off a little grease if you squeeze it hard) and bread that's sort of halfway between a traditional loaf and a flat bread. Oh, and sweet apple tea and small, very strong black coffee to wash it down with.

A hearty treat in all the cafes around NZ consists of a base of either pancakes or French toast topped with bacon, grilled banana and maple syrup, often with some stewed berries and a little creme freche at the side.

Of the various breakfasts I had in the States, I liked the corn bread the most, but the most memorable was hot and greasy chilli in a bowl served with crackers from a little chrome-laden diner in Rock Springs, Wyoming.

switters
09-27-2010, 05:53 PM
you ate the chili in Rock Springs? For breakfast no less. You sir, are fearless.

C. Ross
09-27-2010, 06:05 PM
What?!

A boat forum and no one's mentioned a proper Shore Breakfast? Up here it's fresh-caught walleye filet, breaded (flour or cornmeal, panko if you have style), white bread toast, (though some real Minnesotans substitute fried Tater-Tots, a kind of short tubular extruded manufactured hash brown thing, don't ask), often beans out of a can, and beer, preferably Grain Belt or Leinenkugel.

Coffee and doughnuts follow, at about lunchtime.

oznabrag
09-27-2010, 06:08 PM
What?!

A boat forum and no one's mentioned a proper Shore Breakfast? Up here it's fresh-caught walleye filet, breaded (flour or cornmeal, panko if you have style), white bread toast, (though some real Minnesotans substitute fried Tater-Tots, a kind of short tubular extruded manufactured hash brown thing, don't ask), often beans out of a can, and beer, preferably Grain Belt or Leinenkugel.

Coffee and doughnuts follow, at about lunchtime.

Coffee and doughnuts are for second breakfast, here. What do y'all do for Elevenses?

C. Ross
09-27-2010, 06:11 PM
You eat the other half dozen doughnuts, this time with beer instead of coffee.

AnalogKid
09-27-2010, 06:12 PM
you ate the chili in Rock Springs? For breakfast no less. You sir, are fearless.

Needs must.

We'd just arrived in town, our Chevy Caprice Classic had snapped a rod and we were waiting for the garage across the road to open. I suppose there was a certain degree of adventure in choosing the chilli from the menu, but hey, we were there for the experience so why not?

oznabrag
09-27-2010, 06:12 PM
You eat the other half dozen doughnuts, this time with beer instead of coffee.

I'm in!

paul oman
09-27-2010, 06:16 PM
cold pizza and diet coke... (donuts on the weekend!)

S/V Laura Ellen
09-27-2010, 06:22 PM
No breakfast should be with-out peameal bacon.
http://aylard.ca/sites/default/files/imagecache/600/peameal_raw.jpg

http://aylard.ca/sites/default/files/imagecache/600/peameal_cooked.jpg

bobbys
09-27-2010, 06:23 PM
you ate the chili in Rock Springs? For breakfast no less. You sir, are fearless..

Anyone eating Chili for Breakfast anywhere in more of a man then me.....

I might gird me lions for a CAN of mild Chili in a disaster Scenario but to walk into a diner in the West and order Chili for breakfast is a feat of uncommon valor..

I only hope he did not go to the juke box and put on a Disco song......

Tom Montgomery
09-27-2010, 06:28 PM
My father was born & raised in Lexington, Kentucky and thought the ideal breakfast must include either grits, home fries, or biscuits and gravy. But I have never much liked a lot of carbohydrates for breakfast.

My favorite: Scrambled eggs. Three eggs, a good dollop of cream, butter, salt & pepper. Agitate constantly over low heat until soft, wet curds form. Plate just shy of seeming to be completely cooked. The residual heat will finish cooking the eggs. A side of bacon or link sausage is nice but not necessary. A side of seasonal fruit is preferable to orange juice. Steel cut oatmeal is also nice.

My second favorite: hummus and flat bread. Process tahini, white beans, olive oil, garlic & lemon. Serve with sliced cucumbers and tomatoes. Mmmm.... It may not strike most as an "American" breakfast. But it is certainly a wonderful breakfast.

AussieBarney
09-27-2010, 06:48 PM
[QUOTE=seanz;2727667]I think you'll find that you now have Barney's complete attention..........
Yeah, you have it. I was diagnosed with type 2 diabeties three yaers ago. I wish I had known fellers like you lot thirty years ago. might have saved a lot of grief

oznabrag
09-27-2010, 07:32 PM
[QUOTE=seanz;2727667]I think you'll find that you now have Barney's complete attention..........
Yeah, you have it. I was diagnosed with type 2 diabeties three yaers ago. I wish I had known fellers like you lot thirty years ago. might have saved a lot of grief

I am very sorry to learn of this.

I can echo your sentiments in that I wish I had known this lot 30 years ago.

Do as the medicos tell you, man. I hope we have you around for another thirty.

Hell, I hope I'm here to enjoy it!

bobbys
09-27-2010, 07:42 PM
My father was born & raised in Lexington, Kentucky and thought the ideal breakfast must include either grits, home fries, or biscuits and gravy. But I have never much liked a lot of carbohydrates for breakfast.

My favorite: Scrambled eggs. Three eggs, a good dollop of cream, butter, salt & pepper. Agitate constantly over low heat until soft, wet curds form. Plate just shy of seeming to be completely cooked. The residual heat will finish cooking the eggs. A side of bacon or link sausage is nice but not necessary. A side of seasonal fruit is preferable to orange juice. Steel cut oatmeal is also nice.

My second favorite: hummus and flat bread. Process tahini, white beans, olive oil, garlic & lemon. Serve with sliced cucumbers and tomatoes. Mmmm.... It may not strike most as an "American" breakfast. But it is certainly a wonderful breakfast..

I found to add fresh broccoli is to give the eggs a little "crunch" factor.

Keith Wilson
09-27-2010, 08:00 PM
French Toast, the traditional American breakfast food; I have no idea whether or not it has anything to do with France. Very similar to what you'd call egg bread.

- Start with slices of bread with some substance. Stale is fine. San Francisco sourdough bread is fabulous, but it doesn't travel well.
- Beat together eggs and a little milk. I also beat in cinnamon, which is tedious since it doesn't want to mix, but it's worth the trouble.
- Put the bread in the egg mixture briefly; don't get it too soggy.
- Cook over a fairly low flame in a little butter, turning often; a nonstick pan helps.
- Eat hot with butter and genuine maple syrup (accept no substitutes), and maybe pork sausage or bacon if you like. There's a whole genre of sausage called "breakfast sausage" in the US which is seasoned quite differently from anything else. That's what Paul used in his gravy.


Milo, MEDIUM salsa for breakfast? Man, you must be one of those dreadful fellows who springs out of bed at 6AM cheerful, alert, and fully fuctioning. I'm not. Extra hot is essential; gets the blood circulating and the neurons firing.

Hughman
09-27-2010, 08:17 PM
leftover steak with eggs your choice is nice, along with baked beans (this is Maine, after all) accouterments include coffee/toast biscuits ^as above...what do the brits call those things...not cookies?)

I like SOS, creamed chip beef on toast., with grits, sharp cheddar cheese added.

another version of hash potatoes - especially if you forgot to cook the spuds the night before- is to run raw potatos through the grater, with raw onion salt and pepper and a raw egg; squish them into small thin 'burgers', and fry them in oil. I like olive oil..bacon fat makes me retch.

Captain Intrepid
09-27-2010, 08:28 PM
Home smoked bacon, cut thick and fried so it's still a little chewy, a couple hot italian sausages, fried eggs with lots of freshly ground black pepper, course enough it's almost just cracked, hashbrowns fried with onions, or potato cakes, fried onions, perhaps with a little cinnamon, a coffee, a cup of tea and a stout. That's a breakfast that'll last you all week. Perogies are a nice addition especially with jam and sour cream!

bobbys
09-27-2010, 09:28 PM
We have Potato Pancakes/Latkes for Hanukkah.

First have Shana Maidala peel potatos.

http://i906.photobucket.com/albums/ac262/bobby53bucket/CIMG3112.jpg

bobbys
09-27-2010, 09:33 PM
Put sour cream and Maple syrupie on top.

http://i906.photobucket.com/albums/ac262/bobby53bucket/CIMG3133.jpg

purri
09-28-2010, 01:43 AM
Usually a wholemeal toasted crumpet with garlic olive butter and a real espresso.

Otherwise Pho de jour or Tom Yum.

PeterSibley
09-28-2010, 01:57 AM
A slice of a rather unusual sprouted ,uncooked bread ...usually rye , with peanut butter and dates .A cup of expresso and an apple .

North Coast old hippy breakfast ...a very minor grouping .

leikec
09-28-2010, 02:04 AM
A "Slinger" prepared at the Courtesy Diner here in St. Louis accounts for the large percentage of wealthy cardiologists in the area....

Jeff C

Presuming Ed
09-28-2010, 04:29 AM
What I do:

Mon - Fri. Juice of whatever I've sqeezed/juiced. Summer - bowl of home made musili with fruit. Winter - porridge. My preferred receipt is: 1/2 cup jumbo rolled oats, 1/2 cup water, 1/2 cup semi-skimmed milk. My g/f prefers a mix of rolled oats, oat groats & pinhead oatmeal soaked overnight in home made soya/oat milk. Coffee.

Weekends when sailing - fry up: selection from: eggs on toast (poached or scrambled), bacon, sausages, tomatoes, mushrooms. Others may add black pudding (blood sausage), devilled kidneys, baked beans.
Toast & (home made) marmalade, coffee.

When I'm lucky enough to be staying at The Yacht Club. Grapefruit followed by kippers - eaten with a couple of slices of buttered brown toast. Toast and Club's own marmalade. Coffee.

Re toast racks. Soggy is a worse crime against toast than cool. Too cool is your own fault - be quicker next time! Soggy is WRONG.

martin schulz
09-28-2010, 05:16 AM
French Toast, the traditional American breakfast food; I have no idea whether or not it has anything to do with France.

Nothing at all I assure you (same thing with french fries).

Neither will those German versions of Croissants made the same way as Brezel find a pleasing eye in France.
http://media.tumblr.com/tumblr_l3t7jlnLgI1qbispt.jpg

StevenBauer
09-28-2010, 06:47 AM
Well I'm shocked that the only mention of corned beef hash is the canned type. Canned hash tastes like dogfood to me. Real homemade hash is delightful, though. With a fried egg on top - heaven. Not a breakfast I have often but it's appreciated even more that way.

Steven

Syed
09-28-2010, 07:31 AM
Definitely a contender there, Syed. May have to ask Alex's friend Sayful over to help with the finer details!

First a correction, I copied the image from a of Shami Kebab recipe page but now I am almost sure that the image is of Chapli Kebab and the latter is much tastier.

In case you decide to put your hands on the kebab or the kebab in your hands, may I suggest to explore the availability of Shan Chapli Kebab Masala from the store where Pakistanis frequent for their groceries. This will make the whole exercise simpler, just follow the instructions on the pack.

Canoez
09-28-2010, 07:32 AM
Well I'm shocked that the only mention of corned beef hash is the canned type. Canned hash tastes like dogfood to me. Real homemade hash is delightful, though. With a fried egg on top - heaven. Not a breakfast I have often but it's appreciated even more that way.

Steven

Have you been to the Lucky Loggers down in Saco/Biddeford? They a dish they call hash benedict - it's a toasted croissant with hash, a fried egg and Hollandaise sauce on top. Might be a seasonal thing.

Canoez
09-28-2010, 07:42 AM
No breakfast should be with-out peameal bacon.
http://aylard.ca/sites/default/files/imagecache/600/peameal_raw.jpg

http://aylard.ca/sites/default/files/imagecache/600/peameal_cooked.jpg

Aye. Bacon. THAT is a subject unto itself. Most Americans think that Bacon is paper thin strips of fried fat and meat. However, I think the rest of the world gets it right - particularly Canadian bacon and the various styles of bacon found in the UK. It was a revelation to walk in on half an aisle of sundry and various types of bacon cures at Tesco's on one of my first visits. In the US, it would be referred to as "back bacon" and is a much healthier option than the "streaky" bacon mostly found here. Plus, a fried egg and bacon on a bap...

My kids were a bit freaked out by the bacon ("No, that's HAM!" insists DS and DD) when they ordered a bacon-cheese burger in a pub.

Paul Pless
09-28-2010, 07:44 AM
However, I think the rest of the world gets it right fail:rolleyes:

Canoez
09-28-2010, 07:46 AM
fail:rolleyes:

Beg to differ. :D

Paul Pless
09-28-2010, 07:52 AM
Why don't we just call all those other international cuts of breakfast pork what they really are?

Ham.:d

Canoez
09-28-2010, 07:58 AM
This (uncooked):

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/92/Bacon.JPG/220px-Bacon.JPG

or:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d3/NCI_bacon.jpg/220px-NCI_bacon.jpg

It's still cured and sometimes that includes brining and smoking. Flavor is excellent and it's a *bit* better for you, but still a lot of fat and salt.


Why don't we just call all those other international cuts of breakfast pork what they really are?

Ham.:d

All righty, then. What would you call Scrapple and Taylor Ham? :eek::(

C. Ross
09-28-2010, 07:59 AM
My vegetarian daughter loves the soy bacon. They call it "fakin"

Milo Christensen
09-28-2010, 08:04 AM
I don't get the Taylor Ham, I read the description and it sounds like round Spam? Never having partaken of Taylor Ham, would anyone who has eaten both Taylor Ham and Spam care to comment? If you've eaten Taylor Ham and Spam at the same meal, please don't bother to comment as I wouldn't value your opinion in the same way you don't value your life.

Paul Pless
09-28-2010, 08:21 AM
I don't get the Taylor HamI've never had it either, can't be any worse than that peculiar German prepared pork product, ham in aspic jelly. WTF is up with that???

Iceboy
09-28-2010, 09:02 AM
"All righty, then. What would you call Scrapple and Taylor Ham? :eek::( "

Offal?

Milo Christensen
09-28-2010, 09:07 AM
Iceboy, have you ever had a really authentic slice of scrapple? I mean, late autumn, Pennsylvania Amish scrapple (http://secretfoods.blogspot.com/2005/09/amish-scrapple.html)?

Scott Rosen
09-28-2010, 09:13 AM
Canned hash tastes like dogfood to me.

Steven

I just have to ask . . . . ?

Canoez
09-28-2010, 09:22 AM
I just have to ask . . . . ?

Didn't you ever wonder how Alpo could make the claim, "Better tasting"?

:eek:

Captain Intrepid
09-28-2010, 10:32 AM
One oddity I've seen here in Nova Scotia, and I don't know if it's confined to the college I'm going to, or if it's a more widespread thing, is fried bologna with breakfast.

TomF
09-28-2010, 10:45 AM
Iceboy, have you ever had a really authentic slice of scrapple? I mean, late autumn, Pennsylvania Amish scrapple (http://secretfoods.blogspot.com/2005/09/amish-scrapple.html)?I've tried a scrapple recipe before, and wasn't vastly impressed with the results. But I'm happy to try this one, to see if I just had it wrong.

downthecreek
09-28-2010, 11:47 AM
Neither will those German versions of Croissants made the same way as Brezel find a pleasing eye in France.


Tragically, it's actually getting quite hard to find really good croissants in France. The best one I have eaten recently was served for breakfast at the Waterside Inn in Braye - a very expensive, very good and by no means very grand restaurant by the River Thames. Sort of French owned, of course, but by a family long established in England. That was the real thing - light as a feather, crisp outside and soft within. Really took me back forty years to the ones we used to row ashore to buy for breakfast, mouths watering, whilst sailing along the French coast.

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
09-28-2010, 11:52 AM
Scrambled egg with smoked salmon - served with hot tattie scones.

Whameller
09-28-2010, 12:15 PM
9 Months of eating in US Army DFACs in Baghdad last year confirmed to me that all of the above (less kebabs, black pudding, kidneys & kippers) are typical 'American' breakfast fare - but you have all missed out the one essential element of the US breakfast: the 'English' muffin.

Iceboy
09-28-2010, 01:39 PM
Iceboy, have you ever had a really authentic slice of scrapple? I mean, late autumn, Pennsylvania Amish scrapple (http://secretfoods.blogspot.com/2005/09/amish-scrapple.html)?
That one I would be willing to eat Milo. Kinda like having a hotdog with no lips, feet or butt holes:)

Scott Rosen
09-28-2010, 01:47 PM
but you have all missed out the one essential element of the US breakfast: the 'English' muffin. :d
Which goes well with french fries, Nova Scotia smoked salmon, Spanish Omelette and the like . . . .

Bill Dodson
09-28-2010, 02:09 PM
Waffle House menu (http://www.wafflehouse.com/welcome/menu)
I'll take the All-Star Special with fried eggs over medium, grits, sausage, and a cuppa joe.

Bill

paladin
09-28-2010, 03:25 PM
well....it's back to the Caravelle Hotel...or Pearls in Dakao.

downthecreek
09-28-2010, 03:55 PM
9 Months of eating in US Army DFACs in Baghdad last year confirmed to me that all of the above (less kebabs, black pudding, kidneys & kippers) are typical 'American' breakfast fare - but you have all missed out the one essential element of the US breakfast: the 'English' muffin.

Ah, kippers! Nothing like a really good kipper for breakfast :)

English muffins are a mystery. I've never come across one in England, although they must graced our scepter'd isle with their presence at some time, since there is an old song that refers to "the muffin man". I think I have a vague notion of what they might be like, but I can't be sure.......

I wonder if Amdrew's lads ought to be offered that abomination - the airline breakfast? I have long thought that airline food constitutes a "cuisine" (a deeply horrible example of the genre) all of its own. I've had some weird and wonderful examples of the airline breakfast in my time. Or rather, I haven't. On the whole, I would rather starve.

I refer, of course, to the cuisine of the cattle truck class. I have no experience of the sharp end and cannot comment on the gastronomic delights that may be set before the denizens thereof. |:)

Peerie Maa
09-28-2010, 04:06 PM
Ah, kippers! Nothing like a really good kipper for breakfast :) Only properly smoked ones, Manx or some Scottish. Not the Scottish dyed abominations.


English muffins are a mystery. I've never come across one in England, although they must graced our scepter'd isle with their presence at some time, since there is an old song that refers to "the muffin man". I think I have a vague notion of what they might be like, but I can't be sure.......
Here you go Downey http://www.thekneadforbread.com/wp-content/uploads/english_muffin.jpg


I wonder if Amdrew's lads ought to be offered that abomination - the airline breakfast? I have long thought that airline food constitutes a "cuisine" (a deeply horrible example of the genre) all of its own. I've had some weird and wonderful examples of the airline breakfast in my time. Or rather, I haven't. On the whole, I would rather starve.

I refer, of course, to the cuisine of the cattle truck class. I have no experience of the sharp end and cannot comment on the gastronomic delights that may be set before the denizens thereof. |:)

You will feel for my In-laws then, 24 hours flying time from Oz home, following the sunrise all the way, and offered Breakfast for every meal.

Food on European carriers is better, although that may be just the novelty value.

bobbys
09-28-2010, 04:07 PM
This is one of our favorite meals, English muffin with Fresh crab with Cheese on top toasted.

http://i906.photobucket.com/albums/ac262/bobby53bucket/CIMG6180.jpg

Peerie Maa
09-28-2010, 04:16 PM
This is one of our favorite meals, English muffin with Fresh crab with Cheese on top toasted.

http://i906.photobucket.com/albums/ac262/bobby53bucket/CIMG6180.jpg

Muffins yes, crab, definitely, toasted cheese yes, but toasted cheese on crab just ruins good crab.

Kaa
09-28-2010, 04:38 PM
English muffins are a mystery. I've never come across one in England, although they must graced our scepter'd isle with their presence at some time, since there is an old song that refers to "the muffin man". I think I have a vague notion of what they might be like, but I can't be sure.......

:-)

http://eatfamilystyles.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/06/english-muffin.jpg

Here you go.

You fork a muffin apart and eat it with jam and clotted cream. For reference consult Elisabeth Davis' English Bread and Yeast Cookery.

Oh, what basics one has to teach these ignorant limeys... :D

Kaa

Peerie Maa
09-28-2010, 04:43 PM
I'm impressed Kaa, you even found an English image. Downey is right though, they have fallen sadly out of fashion, those ones were probably baked for the American tourist trade. ;)

Andrew Craig-Bennett
09-28-2010, 04:44 PM
Ah, kippers! Nothing like a really good kipper for breakfast :)

English muffins are a mystery. I've never come across one in England, although they must graced our scepter'd isle with their presence at some time, since there is an old song that refers to "the muffin man". I think I have a vague notion of what they might be like, but I can't be sure.......


There is a very good and clear recipe for muffins in Elizabeth David's "English bread and yeast cookery", which I have followed with complete sucess. She also gives a recipe for crumpets, which i have also had sucess with. I will dig them out and post them.

One can get rather good kippers at Pinneys smokehouse at Orford.

The boys have had sufficient experience of the airline cattle class breakfast already, thanks. There was a period before I married their mother when I was permitted to fly ID90 on a well known airline based in Hong Kong. First class breakfast was rather good and even ran to a proper boiled egg.

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
09-28-2010, 04:44 PM
Here you go Downey http://www.thekneadforbread.com/wp-content/uploads/english_muffin.jpg
....

Never seen one baked in England...
But, when I was small, they were available from the baker - used to collect a half dozen fresh baked at 06:45 am - and eat at breakfast before school.

Andrew Craig-Bennett
09-28-2010, 04:51 PM
As a perusal of Elizabeth David makes clear, the reason for the decline of the commercially available muffin in England is that the equipment needed to produce it commercially, a muffin stone, is specialised, it is labour intensive, even by the standards of artisan bakers, hence it is expensive and once made it does not keep beyond an hour or two.

But they are fun to make at home.

StevenBauer
09-28-2010, 05:08 PM
Canned hash tastes like dogfood to me. Steven


I just have to ask . . . . ?

Alright. You caught me. I haven't actually tasted canned hash. To be perfectly accurate I should have said that canned hash smells like dogfood. That's as far as I could get. No way I'd actually taste anything that smells like that.


And while I'm here, Taylor Ham is nothing like Spam. THC on a roll - yummy. Spam - not so much.


(THC =Taylor Ham and Cheese)



Steven

Andrew Craig-Bennett
09-28-2010, 05:44 PM
In the village of Peasenhall, about twenty miles to the north of us, is a grocer's shop called Emmett's, with a sign outside which informs you that they were Purveyors of Bacon to Her Late Majesty the Queen Mother. Specifically back bacon cured in stout and blavk treacle...

StevenBauer
09-28-2010, 06:12 PM
I Googled "blavk treacle," and found nothing.


Probably just ham anyway.


:D




Steven

bobbys
09-28-2010, 06:19 PM
Muffins yes, crab, definitely, toasted cheese yes, but toasted cheese on crab just ruins good crab..

Well My son is a Commercial crab fisherman, The Sister boats are on that TV show so we first get our fill with butter and beer and the left over is for toastie crab cheeses.

Its only good fresh so we give a lot to the neighbors and friends.

huisjen
09-28-2010, 07:17 PM
No one has mentioned that New England breakfast: Pie.

Dan

katey
09-28-2010, 08:12 PM
No one has mentioned that New England breakfast: Pie.

Dan

Or cake. That's what I was thinking.

coelacanth2
09-28-2010, 08:35 PM
Dan is right - dad occasionally enjoyed a good slice of apple ie with a slab of medium sharp cheddar on top...tried it myself and rather liked it esp. with strong coffee. BTW, leftover pizza is known around here as"bachelor breakfast bread"

paladin
09-28-2010, 09:03 PM
Absolutely best breakfasts to be had on an airline (or any other meal) Is one of the Orchid Flights, Thai Airways. Any class is excellent, first class is stupendous.

Milo Christensen
09-28-2010, 09:28 PM
Or cake. That's what I was thinking.

Which immediately brings to mind the Bill Cosby routine on giving the kids chocolate cake for breakfast.

Good way to spend 9:28.
(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sRmN4KnfPxQ)

downthecreek
09-29-2010, 03:02 AM
:-)
Oh, what basics one has to teach these ignorant limeys... :D

Kaa

We always ate jam and clotted cream with Devon splits and very nice they were too. Never with muffins.

These usually followed a freshly dressed crab with a little salad. Mr. Johnson was the crab fisherman. You went to the cottage in the morning and there would be a row of crabs (the night's catch) lined up on the piano. (It was an upright. Crab fishermen didn't normally run to grands) You selected your crab and when you returned at lunchtime it would be waiting for you, having been dressed by Mrs. Johnson.

:):)

downthecreek
09-29-2010, 03:07 AM
One can get rather good kippers at Pinneys smokehouse at Orford.



And lots of other rather good things as well. Sailing has been terribly curtailed this year, for reasons you know of, but a visit to Pinney's and it's associated eatery are always on the list for a visit when we do our usual potter up the coast. Anchor in the Butley River of course. Lovely. :)

WX
09-29-2010, 03:15 AM
Steamed brown rice
Desert spoon full Macadamia nuts
A level desert spoon full of LSA powder ( equal parts of linseeds, sunflowers and almonds)
Two desert spoon fulls of Bornhoffen yoghurt (unsweetened natural )
Desert spoon of your favourite honey.

I wouldn't call it a national breakfast but it works for me and tastes good.

downthecreek
09-29-2010, 05:00 AM
I'm impressed Kaa, you even found an English image. Downey is right though, they have fallen sadly out of fashion, those ones were probably baked for the American tourist trade. ;)

Thank you, sir. I have seen commercial versions in America, but never clapped eyes on one here.

I don't exactly mind being called "downey", except that I am locked, on behalf of a small voluntary organisation that tends to sop up a lot of my free time, in mortal combat with a person of that name who gives us a lot of grief. The vibes are not good. :)

Peerie Maa
09-29-2010, 12:49 PM
Thank you, sir. I have seen commercial versions in America, but never clapped eyes on one here.

I don't exactly mind being called "downey", except that I am locked, on behalf of a small voluntary organisation that tends to sop up a lot of my free time, in mortal combat with a person of that name who gives us a lot of grief. The vibes are not good. :)

OK, what pet name would you prefer? DTC sounds like a medical abbreviation so I would rather something else. If the hip is cured Creekey is hardly appropriate.:p

Chip-skiff
09-29-2010, 09:23 PM
Had some grand breakfasts at crossroads hotel/pubs in New Zealand: Iggs, fried, scrambled, or poached; Sausages, nice fat sizzly; Tomatoes, sliced and hotted up in a dab of butter; Chips, crisp and perfectly scorched; Bread, toasted thick slices or specialties like damper scones. A nice bit of fruit in season. Various pastries. Jam or Marmite/Vegemite. Tea that'd stand a spoon, chastened with milk.

One Kiwi dish I never had the courage to sample was canned spaghetti in tomato sauce on pancakes. Thought up no doubt by a sheepo at the end of his ration. A wonder that it caught on.

Nicholas Carey
09-29-2010, 11:52 PM
Hash Browns

Proper hash browns are grated rather than diced (diced makes them home fries).

You'll need high starch potatoes (Russets preferred in the US. No idea what sort of high starch potatoes are available in the UK -- but wait! -- Google is your friend. http://www.lovepotatoes.co.uk/potato-varieties/

Looks like King Edward or Golden Wonder would be the varieties of choice.

I use two largeish Russets, enough to fill an 8-inch skillet.

Peel your taties and grate them with a coarse grater into a large bowl of cold water.

When you're done, dump the potatoes and water into colander to drain, then rinse under running water. Return the potatoes to the bowl, fill with fresh water and stir it around with your hands for 30 seconds or so. Repeat until the water in the bowl is clear. You want to get rid o the surface starch.

Now drain your potatoes in the colander and dump them into a clean, dry kitchen towel -- cotton or linen. Gather the corners of the towel and form a bag around the potatoes. Over the sink, twist it up as tight as you can and squeeze out as much water as you can. You want the grated potatoes as dry as you can get them.

Put the potatoes in a bowl and toss with salt and pepper to taste.

Dice up a knob of butter -- a couple of tablespoons, more if you want and scatter across the bottom of a cold 8-inch nonstick skillet. Pack the skillet with your grated potatoes. Tuck a little more diced butter around the edges to prevent sticking. Put a lid on it and cook it over medium heat for about 15 minutes or so, until the bottom is golden brown.

Take the lid off, and invert onto a plate, trying to keep the cake in one piece. Toss a bit of butter into the skillet if it seems dry. Let it melt, then swirl it around and slide the inverted cake back into the skillet, so the cooked side is up. Cook without the lid maybe 10 more minutes to finish up -- again, the bottom should be golden brown.

That's about it. American diner-style potatoes (or as close as you'll get without a commercial griddle). Slide them out onto a serving plate and cut into quarters.

Serves 4.

RFNK
09-30-2010, 12:09 AM
Oh dear, Andrew, your



For the record, this is just what I do NOT WANT for breakfast:

http://taidaexchange.files.wordpress.com/2007/11/congee.jpg

Special congee with unidentified bits of pig and pickles


post does seem to be in conflict with the original brief:



on making sure that my sprogs don't grow up as little chauvinists


Nothing wrong with congee - certainly a lot healthier than some of the offerings above! and there are plenty of places where various rice and rice noodle dishes will be all that's on offer!

Rick

RFNK
09-30-2010, 02:21 AM
Saturday mornings here are Farmer's Market day, and when my son busks there ... we let him buy us a late breakfast.


Good grief Tom! I think we should call in Mr Dickens!



One Kiwi dish I never had the courage to sample was canned spaghetti in tomato sauce on pancakes. Thought up no doubt by a sheepo at the end of his ration. A wonder that it caught on.

Oh, believe me, they can do a lot worse than that!



I don't exactly mind being called "downey", except that I am locked, on behalf of a small voluntary organisation that tends to sop up a lot of my free time, in mortal combat with a person of that name who gives us a lot of grief. The vibes are not good. :)

Is it fair that this comment immediately threw Blott on the Landscape back into my consciousness? :d

Rick

RFNK
09-30-2010, 02:54 AM
Guess I'd better contribute something positive ....

Here in Ha Noi I have cereal and a banana smoothie (banana, yoghurt, UHT milk (blech!) on most days but when dragged off to the provinces, it's just about always going to be pho (rice noodle soup with things Andrew wouldn't approve of floating in it), banh cuon (ultra thin rice noodle pancake with things Andrew wouldn't approve of chopped up inside) or banh my op la (fried eggs with French bread).

However, when at home in Oz, it's the following, when time permits (i.e., weekends):

Fresh orange juice
2 soft-boiled eggs (free range, of course) - pinch of salt added
Polish rye toast spread with macadamia butter, with Tasmanian smoked salmon with a touch of hot (proper) mustard
Tea

Rick

seanz
09-30-2010, 02:57 AM
Polish rye toast


Awwww......I haven't had that in ages!


Wonder if I can get some here.
:)

downthecreek
09-30-2010, 03:10 AM
OK, what pet name would you prefer? DTC sounds like a medical abbreviation so I would rather something else. If the hip is cured Creekey is hardly appropriate.:p

You mean, a bit like "D&C" or something? Yes, I can see your point! :D

Hip certainly no longer justifies "creeky". My customary ten mile walks are back on the agenda and very delightful they are too, especially now that the winter birds are returning to the estuaries. That is some compensation for a sailing season that has so far comprised three weekends. (A consequence of the hip, which I wanted to be well healed up before I started jumping around on boats and the fact that my 95 year old mother has been ill and staying with us for the later part of the summer)

Well, I dunno. Sam F sometimes calls me "downer" but I don't think that's very polite. So I think I'll just have to leave it up to yerself, yer honour..... ;)

RFNK
09-30-2010, 03:15 AM
Dot?

PeterSibley
09-30-2010, 03:40 AM
Guess I'd better contribute something positive ....

Here in Ha Noi I have cereal and a banana smoothie (banana, yoghurt, UHT milk (blech!) on most days but when dragged off to the provinces, it's just about always going to be pho (rice noodle soup with things Andrew wouldn't approve of floating in it), banh cuon (ultra thin rice noodle pancake with things Andrew wouldn't approve of chopped up inside) or banh my op la (fried eggs with French bread).

However, when at home in Oz, it's the following, when time permits (i.e., weekends):

Fresh orange juice
2 soft-boiled eggs (free range, of course) - pinch of salt added
Polish rye toast spread with macadamia butter, with Tasmanian smoked salmon with a touch of hot (proper) mustard
Tea

Rick

OK ,fess up ,from whence comes your polish rye ?

RFNK
09-30-2010, 03:55 AM
Well, not from Poland so I guess I should call it Polish-style rye? Several sources, one of which I suspect is available even to you lot up there in the land of Aquarius. Riga used to make a great light rye bread but they've been bought out by a larger bread company - I don't remember the name but it's very common and I'd think available in most supermarkets in NSW at least (wrapping is green and black). Their light rye is still really good. At our local Coles I find that they only ever have a few loaves at a time so i often have to search for it a bit. There's a great bakery in Newcastle called Snows and there's another great bakery at St Ives (Sydney) called Patterson's (I think). I used to buy Polish rye from the Polish delicatessen in Petersham when I worked in Sydney for a while. Hmm, maybe it was Lewisham ...
Rick

Syed
09-30-2010, 07:47 AM
You mean, a bit like "D&C" or something? Yes, I can see your point! :D

Or DDT! :)

BarnacleGrim
09-30-2010, 09:22 AM
Kipper has been mentioned a few times. Try tinned European sprat, a smaller relative of the herring. Or try a Finnish delicacy: Muikku. Coregonus abula, a freshwater species. Fried, or from a tin on top of Karelian pasties.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/6f/Muikku2.jpg/800px-Muikku2.jpg

The roe is prized for hors d'œuvre.

Andrew Craig-Bennett
09-30-2010, 07:48 PM
OK ,fess up ,from whence comes your polish rye ?

I can buy it here in Woodbridge from our excellent local baker, but only on Thursdays, as they don't do all their speciality breads every day.

Breakaway
09-30-2010, 09:08 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3S6iXcx9pLA

downthecreek
10-01-2010, 02:45 AM
Or DDT! :)

Could be.....

or DVT, CVA, EEG, ECG, ECT, PVD, PAD, DOA, TAT.........

:)

Syed
10-01-2010, 03:25 AM
Thank God, it stopped short of TNT.;)

downthecreek
10-01-2010, 03:28 AM
Thank God, it stopped short of TNT.;)

Oh, no. I am a woman endowed with the sweetest of natures and the gentlest of dispositions. TNT wouldn't do at all! ;)

chiefypoo
10-01-2010, 05:53 AM
Down here, fried mullet hot thick grits with butter on top, toast or bisquts and pear preserves hot coffee with chicery half&half and sweetner you can throw along side a piece of country ham maybe red eye gravy on the grits. don't knock it till ya try it.

paladin
10-01-2010, 07:55 AM
I've tried a helluva lotta different breakfasts' around the world.....the one I most often ended up with is coffee, toast, butter and jam. I've tried most all of them at least once, and then when my stomach rebelled, I reverted to toast and coffee.

J P
10-01-2010, 11:31 AM
My second favorite: hummus and flat bread. Process tahini, white beans, olive oil, garlic & lemon. Serve with sliced cucumbers and tomatoes. Mmmm.... It may not strike most as an "American" breakfast. But it is certainly a wonderful breakfast.

More like a "Lebanese" breakfast. Add some olives and a few pieces of feta cheese and you're there. Another Lebanese breakfast thing that I like is a spread of lebneh with a puddle of olive oil on it, sprinkled with zaatar, scooped up and eaten with bits of flat bread. Lebneh is sort of the texture of cream cheese. It can be made by straining plain yogurt in a cloth bag overnight (or longer). Zaatar (za'atar, zahtar) is a spice blend.

Re. home fries. I never bother to precook or peel the taters. I usually use red ones, organic if I can find them, diced to about 13/32", fry in olive oil in a cast iron skillet, med-hot. Trick is to not turn or stir them until the one side is good and brown, then stir/flip occasionally until done. Lower heat if they're burning before getting cooked through but I like some charred bits. I throw some chopped onions on top and let them give off some moisture for a while before stirring them in to cook. Lots of black pepper, little bit of salt. Garlic and other veggies often go in the mix depending on whats on hand. Ketchup or salsa on top.

Michael D. Storey
10-01-2010, 05:19 PM
The Boys made up a thing in their younger youths known as the Garbage Plate, consisting of bacon, egg, baked beans (with cottage cheese), sour kraut, and the usual coffee, etc, plus fresh corn bread. We still have it when we are together.

S/V Laura Ellen
10-01-2010, 05:23 PM
The Boys made up a thing in their younger youths known as the Garbage Plate, consisting of bacon, egg, baked beans (with cottage cheese), sour kraut, and the usual coffee, etc, plus fresh corn bread. We still have it when we are together.


Was right there with you except for the cottage cheese!

Paul Pless
10-01-2010, 05:25 PM
Was right there with you except for the cottage cheese!you can't lie to us, we know a little pile of curds wouldn't stop a poutine eater like yourself

S/V Laura Ellen
10-01-2010, 05:28 PM
you can't lie to us, we know a little pile of curds wouldn't stop a poutine eater like yourself

Big difference between the cheese on poutine and that crap called cottage cheese. Cottage cheese gives cottages a bad name.

Paul Pless
10-01-2010, 05:29 PM
Big difference between the cheese on poutine and that crap called cottage cheese. I wouldn't know, I've never had either one.

RFNK
10-01-2010, 09:08 PM
I think we're learning from this that people will eat just about anything .... for breakfast!
Rick

paladin
10-01-2010, 09:28 PM
My favorite breakfast came around 5-5:30 a.m.

Breakaway
10-01-2010, 10:43 PM
A mixture of room temperature mozzarella and ricotta cheeses, spread evenly over crispy flat bread and dosed with a basil-heavy tomato sauce, perhaps some sausage, mushrooms and/or peppers if the mood strikes...
...leftover pizza.

Kevin