PDA

View Full Version : Sump Pump Advice



Jefe
09-21-2010, 02:42 PM
Any recommendations for a good quality pump? Here are the details.

My mother's basement has had 2 major floods in the last 5-6 years. No flooding in the 35 years or so prior to that. As far as we can guess the flooding is from an elevation of the water table during heavy, prolonged periods of rain. (Gutters, landscaping etc have been evaluated.)

The basement is probably around 1100 square feet or so. There is a small corner (~4 or 5 sq ft) where a concrete floor was not put down. This was originally where the water pump was (since removed for city water). My plan was to dig out a sump hole there and make the well out of cesspool block. Then cover the outside of the well with fabric and then stone.

I am looking for a durable, reliable pump. From what little I have read, it seems like submersible is preferable. I found some info on the "Little Giant" and "Zoeller". I expect it would only run on the few occasions when the water table rises.

Although I don't want to throw away money, cost is not a major issue - I would pay anything not to have to deal with a basement flood again! I would be happy to buy a top of the line pump that I don't have to worry about.

Shang
09-21-2010, 03:25 PM
Check this site for information: Sump Pumps Buying Guide
http://www.hometips.com/buying-guides/sump-pumps.html

Chris Coose
09-21-2010, 03:42 PM
Most pumps last a long time. I had one that would cycle every 15 minutes for 3-4 months a year and only stop for a couple months in the summer and it lasted 15 years. I don't remember, but with the switch it was something like $125.00

Jefe
09-21-2010, 05:43 PM
Most pumps last a long time. I had one that would cycle every 15 minutes for 3-4 months a year and only stop for a couple months in the summer and it lasted 15 years. I don't remember, but with the switch it was something like $125.00

My concern is one that may only need to switch on every couple of years...not sure if that is harder on a pump?

Jefe
09-21-2010, 05:49 PM
Check this site for information: Sump Pumps Buying Guide
http://www.hometips.com/buying-guides/sump-pumps.html

Thanks. I did see that one when I googled sump pumps. The "little giant" is epoxy coated cast iron, which sounds good.

dhic001
09-21-2010, 08:51 PM
Important to consider whether the pump will have to pump anything other than water when it does pump. In other words, is there going to be anything other than water in the sump? What kills sump pumps is water ingress into the motor, most commonly through the shaft seal. Seals get damaged most easily by grit, so be aware of the type of seal when you buy a pump. Generally pumps that are designed to pump effluent have more robust seals than those just designed to pump clean water. My preference would be for a Grundfos, probably an AP series.
Daniel

bob winter
09-22-2010, 07:25 AM
Just how much water was in the basement when it was flooded and how fast was it coming in? You may find that one pump won't be enough to handle the volume. I had that problem during the spring at a house I had. Needed three pumps at times. I always used the pumps with the motors on top of the shaft rather than submerged. It doesn't take all that much to clog up a pump so be sure there isn't a lot of **** laying around that can end up in the sump.

huisjen
09-22-2010, 07:56 AM
I had a sump pump. I had a ramp leading down to the basement doors. If the pump had died, the basement could have filled with 2' of water before flowing out over the spillway at the top of the ramp. So several years ago I dug a trench and planted a drain line from the basement door, through the ramp, and out into the lawn as it slopes away, so that gravity would deal with the issue.

Last winter the pump died. Prior Proper Planning Prevents Piss Poor Performance. :D

I hadn't expected the pump to die, but I had expected that eventually there'd be a wet storm that knocked out power for a few days. Don't rely on electric sump pumps. Don't rely on back up generators for things that vital. Gravity works!

Dan

Jefe
09-22-2010, 09:58 AM
I had a sump pump. I had a ramp leading down to the basement doors. If the pump had died, the basement could have filled with 2' of water before flowing out over the spillway at the top of the ramp. So several years ago I dug a trench and planted a drain line from the basement door, through the ramp, and out into the lawn as it slopes away, so that gravity would deal with the issue.

Last winter the pump died. Prior Proper Planning Prevents Piss Poor Performance. :D

I hadn't expected the pump to die, but I had expected that eventually there'd be a wet storm that knocked out power for a few days. Don't rely on electric sump pumps. Don't rely on back up generators for things that vital. Gravity works!

Dan

This basement is completely underground. No possibility for any gravity system (that I can think of). Probably will need to see if I can figure out some type of battery back-up system?

Peter Malcolm Jardine
09-22-2010, 10:51 AM
First of all, I never use one pump. Put one down deeper than the other, and put one near the floor level if possible. The one nearer the floor level will hardly ever fail, because it won't be submersed if you set it up right. have both plugged in. If the deeper one fails, at least one of them is going to come on. Typically one good pump for the deeper pump, and one chinese one for other. Yep, if you get power outages, a generator or battery backup is a good idea. The problem with batteries is that they have a life too.

S&S.
09-22-2010, 10:57 AM
We have a similar situation to yours. After going though several submersibles over the years (mostly due to switch failures) We went with a Teel (now Dayton)vertical pump- it's lasted at least 15 years with no problems. I'd never go back to a submersible again.

http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/DAYTON-Sump-Pump-3XU83?Pid=search


1086

PhaseLockedLoop
09-22-2010, 12:12 PM
I had submerged a sump pump in my house growing up, between 1950-1964. It turned on frequently when wet. No trouble that I recall. Now for the last 17 years I've had a submerged pump, and had trouble only once, when the power went out. Since I'm now away about half the time, I rigged up a 2500-watt Xantrex inverter/charger/transfer switch that turns on when the power quits. It's fed by a pair of AGM batteries, which are kept charged by the inverter rig when the power is on.