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View Full Version : California passes Chelsea's law



skipper68
09-11-2010, 09:53 AM
Y> Finally someones got the right idea! Thursday,Governor Schwarzenegger signed into law,Chelsea's law,making it mandatory,life in prison,without parole to child molesters. It's now being recognized for what it is. There is no rehabilitation for these animals,and now they'll spend the rest of their lives in a cage,where they belong. (I would wish for the death penalty,but it cost taxpayers too much,with all the appeals) Heres hoping the rest of the nation follows in this direction!Y>

Phillip Allen
09-11-2010, 10:24 AM
so long is it isn't used as emotional leverage to get confessions out of people

Flying Orca
09-11-2010, 10:51 AM
I'm leery of mandatory sentences of this nature, though emotionally they certainly have some appeal. The problem is they leave no room for nuance, and nuance in the law is important IMNSHO.

Tristan
09-11-2010, 11:39 AM
Sounds OK to me... as long as it isn't applied to 18 year olds who have 17 year old girlfriends.

What about 18 year olds who have 16 1/2 year old girlfriends? Having worked (in the prison system) with convicted "sex offenders" I saw a huge variety of cases ranging from the sort of case you mention to the out and out pedophiles who rape 3 year olds. There is no "one size fits all" for sex offenders. Each case should be tried on it's merits.

Dave Gray
09-11-2010, 01:08 PM
Did they say how it was going to be funded? A side effect of mandatory and life long sentences is that the tax payer has to put tax dollars towards this. I am somewhat tongue and cheek in saying this, but is this an example of tax largess?

bobbys
09-11-2010, 03:07 PM
I have heard of many discarded wives claiming , Molester, for no reason but to get a phony charge on the EX...

I think the Lawyers tell people on the sly to do this.

Tristan
09-11-2010, 04:18 PM
I have heard of many discarded wives claiming , Molester, for no reason but to get a phony charge on the EX...
.

Yep, This is more common than one would wish. Sad.

Phillip Allen
09-11-2010, 04:30 PM
Yep, This is more common than one would wish. Sad.

it always amazes me just how mean and ruthless former lovers can be to one another...meaner than they would be to a bum on the street

Concordia...41
09-11-2010, 06:48 PM
I have heard of many discarded wives claiming , Molester, for no reason but to get a phony charge on the EX...

I think the Lawyers tell people on the sly to do this.

I'm not going to say this never happens, and I get the hating one's soon-to-be-ex thing. But making a deliberately false claim that they molested your child - and thus putting the child through an ordeal that begins with a sexual exam - not so much.

The most common thing we see are the trumped up domestic violence allegations - which immediately removes the allegedly offending party from the house and prohibits contact - and that beats waiting months while divorce gets sorted out.

I never thought it would withstand the Constitutional challenge, but Florida's Jimmy Rice law created a procedure where - even when someone has served their time - 5, 10, 20 years - that they can be civilly committed if they are deemed to be a danger or "un-rehabilitated."

Nanoose
09-11-2010, 08:02 PM
One of my first thoughts was about the cost of this, particularly in a virtually bankrupt state. Doesn't incarceration run about 50-60K/year?

Tristan
09-11-2010, 08:30 PM
I'm not going to say this never happens, and I get the hating one's soon-to-be-ex thing. But making a deliberately false claim that they molested your child - and thus putting the child through an ordeal that begins with a sexual exam - not so much.

The most common thing we see are the trumped up domestic violence allegations - which immediately removes the allegedly offending party from the house and prohibits contact - and that beats waiting months while divorce gets sorted out.

I never thought it would withstand the Constitutional challenge, but Florida's Jimmy Rice law created a procedure where - even when someone has served their time - 5, 10, 20 years - that they can be civilly committed if they are deemed to be a danger or "un-rehabilitated."

For about a year around 1989 I was the psychologist attached to a sex offender "treatment" program n Florida. The State eventually decided that sex offender treatment was not effective and did away with the program. Based on what I saw during that year I believe that a lot of offenders are prone to re-offend when released. We had some seriously dangerous (to children and/or adults) guys in the program, also one kid of 18 or so who had sex with a cousin about 15 who probably should have never been charged as a sex offender. I do tend to agree that "treatment" for sex offenders probably will never totally prevent them from offending but might help them in other ways.

Canoeyawl
09-11-2010, 09:57 PM
One of the unintended consequences of this will be that now they will just kill the victim.
Nothing to lose.