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J. Dillon
07-29-2010, 03:50 PM
SHMBO found this iron ball whill digging up for a new flower bed.

It measures 1 1/2 " and weighs 8 oz.

Could this be a cannon ball left over from past ?

JD



http://a.imageshack.us/img375/9210/cball.jpg

Peerie Maa
07-29-2010, 03:53 PM
Either that, or from a mineral crushing mill. Bit small for a mill though. Were there ant set piece battles where grape shot may have been used near you?

J. Dillon
07-29-2010, 04:01 PM
Could be. This is Colonial New England soil. Indians roamed freely here for 10,000 years.... once the mile high ice melted.:D

JD

Peerie Maa
07-29-2010, 04:06 PM
I think that iron ball would have been artillery. Small arm ball was usually lead, as the troops could cast their own. That is why I suggested grape shot from an artillery piece, hence the set piece battle.

Paul Pless
07-29-2010, 04:06 PM
It measures 1 1/2 " and weighs 8 oz.Probably not a canon ball, its too big to be typical canister, it could be a piece of grape. . . more likely its a piece of scrap from something unrelated. Take it to your local historical society, they may be able to tell ya.

paladin
07-29-2010, 04:23 PM
Swivel guns used a small ball about the size of a golf ball, maybe a bit smaller. I can't get to mine to measure them as I have a small monkey with 4 that set on it.

J. Dillon
07-29-2010, 04:46 PM
Thanks for the leads guys. The internet is great, found this bit:

The invasion of several towns along Long Island Sound in July, 1779, has been written about in Dawson’s Battles of the United States, vol. 1:507-16. Documents are included with the essay. The New Haven attack is described best in C.H. Townshend, The British Invasion of New Haven Together with Some Account of the Landing and Burning of the Towns of Fairfield and Norwalk. (New Haven: n. pub., 1879). But see also
Brown, Lloyd A. Loyalist Operations at New Haven. Ann Arbor: The Clements Library, 1938. This is a little collection of maps of the raid on New Haven in 1779 and 1781. It is subtitled, “Including Capt. Patric Ferguson’s Letter with Map Dated May 27, 1779 and Capt. Hubbel’s Report and Map of His Raid on New Haven, April 19, 1781.”
Green, M. Louise. "New Haven Defenses in the Revolution and the War of 1812." Connecticut Quarterly 4 (1892) 9. The author was a professional historian.
Goodrich, Chauncey. "Invasion of New Haven by the British Troops, July 5, 1779." Papers of the NHCHS 2 (1877) :29-92. Goodrich read this paper in 1867 and died the next year. He was familiar with a great many eye-witnesses who were only a generation older than he.
Moore, John E., Jr. "An Episode in the Revolutionary War: The British Attack on New Haven." Journal of the NHCHS 15 (December, 1966) 4:71-78. A modest sketch.
Of course, there is a good account in Rolin Osteweiss's Three Centuries of New Haven, pp. 138-49.
By far the best account of the coastal raids of 1779--those on New Haven, Fairfield, and Norwalk--is that of Thomas Farnham, "'The Enemy Was in Town': The British Raids on Connecticut, July, 1779," in Journal of the NHCHS 24 (Summer, 1976) 2:3-63. This is a thoroughly professional job by an academic historian, who concludes: "Perhaps the raids from the very beginning were bound to fail, for they were based on a false premise; ... that the Revolution was the work of a small group of immoral malcontents." (p. 63)


We're close enough to New Haven CT to be included in this skirmish. Now about swivel guns, If not mounted aboard ship, just how did they carry and fire them on land ?

JD

paladin
07-29-2010, 05:26 PM
They were normally mounted on the bows of small skiffs, the type that could carry perhaps 6-8 men, and used along the coast against small troop carriers. A big person, or two average men back then could pick it up and run with it then mount it in a small carriage, another man carries the powder etc, then each man would carry a couple of balls or four, plus small arms.

Mrleft8
07-30-2010, 07:27 AM
Jack, you live fairly close to Eli Whitney's factory.....I bet they did a certain amount of test firing too....

Tom Hunter
07-30-2010, 08:21 AM
I vote against cannon ball because of the 8 ounce wieght. Cannons were described by the wieght of thier shot, and half pounder is just a bit too small. I'd consider some of the other possibilities raised here.

paladin
07-30-2010, 11:49 AM
From the Gunbroker site.....


Rare, Antique, Pounder Cannon Ball for a 1.58 Caliber Cannon and a Decorative Mounted Cannon with a Hidden Trinket Tray

This cannon ball was made for the smallest iron cannon, known as the Pounder. The cannon weighed 165 pounds, was 36 inches long and had a 1.58 inch caliber bore. The cannon ball in this auction has a seam around the center and a small flat spot. We have read that they were cast as two halves, then formed into one ball. The ball has not been cleaned and retains casting flaws, browning and small rust pits. Measuring the ball at several locations gave a diameter of 1.495” - 1.53”. This is very close to the specified 1.52” diameter shot for the Pounder cannon. The decorative mounted cannon has a cast non-firing barrel with a covered trinket storage area.

J. Dillon
07-30-2010, 07:08 PM
Rare, Antique, Pounder Cannon Ball for a 1.58 Caliber Cannon and a Decorative Mounted Cannon with a Hidden Trinket Tray

This cannon ball was made for the smallest iron cannon, known as the Pounder. The cannon weighed 165 pounds, was 36 inches long and had a 1.58 inch caliber bore. The cannon ball in this auction has a seam around the center and a small flat spot. We have read that they were cast as two halves, then formed into one ball. The ball has not been cleaned and retains casting flaws, browning and small rust pits. Measuring the ball at several locations gave a diameter of 1.495 - 1.53. This is very close to the specified 1.52 diameter shot for the Pounder cannon. The decorative mounted cannon has a cast non-firing barrel with a covered trinket storage area.


Chuck, thanks for you sleuthing.:d It's something to think you do things like this for all the Fourmites.
:ycool:
JD

Fitz
07-30-2010, 08:33 PM
How old is your house? How deep was your artifact? (See thimble thread:d).

Was fill brought in at some point?

Is it a ball bearing?

By the way, I like the thought that it is a cannon ball.

Fitz.

Ed Harrow
07-30-2010, 08:43 PM
I s'pose I should put up a photo of 'my' cannon ball - ~ 4" dia and hollow. There's the remains of threads on the hole in.

J. Dillon
07-30-2010, 08:47 PM
Funny that you asked that Fitz. I questioned SHMBO about where she found it. I automatically thought it was where she was digging
to plant some flowers. It turns out that it was a cast out from a new wood chuck hole right under the kitchen window. :eek:

Now I wonder just what else might be down there.B:?

JD

paladin
07-30-2010, 09:18 PM
Ed....yours is a cannister "bomb" fuse ignites when powder charge is ignited.


and could also have been a grenade tossed by other means.

J.D. I use Gunbroker quite a bit so know where to look for things. No problem to find things that folks have difficulty with...no big deal.