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David G
07-27-2010, 12:51 AM
I thought some folks might be interested in fotos of this little project. The client had a bowsprit with about 10" of the butt-end rotted. I lopped off about 15", and replaced it with a new piece of timber - by way of a clothespin scarf. This is the Sturdy/Quick&Dirty version of this repair - as it was going to be painted afterward.

Glue for laminating the new stock was Raka epoxy, unthickened. For the scarf itself, a coat of unthickened, then a coat of thickened before mushing the two together.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/arbordg/sets/72157624466966133/

P.L.Lenihan
07-27-2010, 01:32 AM
Nice fix David.I would have tried to sell him on the idea of a new bowsprit however,judging by the outboard end of the sprit.But pictures can play tricks on ones eyes and you certainly saw the real condition it is in rather than my lomg distance guess. What type of filler did you use in your epoxy?


Cheers!

Peter

wizbang 13
07-27-2010, 02:02 AM
Mighty fine joinery for poxy!!

Thorne
07-27-2010, 07:22 AM
Nice work, Twin!

David G
07-27-2010, 09:41 AM
Peter,

The filler was maybe 1/3 fumed silica and 2/3 wood flour.

The rest of the sprit was sound enough for his budget. The teak platform, however, had issues. He was gonna do his own Quick & Dirty repair on that - involving lots of filled epoxy as well.

Ian McColgin
07-27-2010, 09:50 AM
I love the cloths pin scarf for spar repair.

Jay Greer
07-27-2010, 10:42 AM
I am impressed by the skill displayed in that inside cut! Band saw or hand saw? Jig guided or freehand?
Jay

David G
07-27-2010, 10:56 AM
Jay,

Thanks. Coming from you, such a compliment is heartwarming.

Bandsaw. Freehand.

As you know, having the right tool makes all the difference. This is a very nice Mini-Max with a sharp, wide blade on it. If I'd tried it on the little Delta 14"... it certainly would have been much more of a challenge.

P.L.Lenihan
07-27-2010, 01:31 PM
[QUOTE=David G;2668986]

As you know, having the right tool makes all the difference. /QUOTE]

I've often heard uttered, in my saner though no less reckless youth, that only a poor craftman blames his tools or lack there of.

Am I only having a phantom memory moment or is there a grain of truth to that saying?

Mind you, Good Sir David G., you are beyond reproach in my books.


Cheers!

Peter

Ian McColgin
07-27-2010, 03:03 PM
I do the female cut first with a jig top and bottom using my all purpose japanese pull saw. Then I make the male end to fit as that's the side that's easier to plane perfect.

I like to plane the V point of the male end just a little flat. That serves as a guid hole for drilling a bigger hole for a plug, like a stopwater but it's not. I don't really think a perfect >> fit is a bad thing leading to split wood or anything. It just seems easier with that step.

David G
07-27-2010, 06:56 PM
Ian,

I agree about blunting the pointy end of the male plug... at least when using epoxy. I wouldn't try and convince anyone that there's a good reason for it, it just seems right. I knocked off about 1/8" of the tip on this one with a sanding block, and rounded it slightly.

Jay Greer
07-27-2010, 06:57 PM
Although the band saw is quicker, I must confess that I too resort to one of those backward Asian saws for such a joint.
Jay

MiddleAgesMan
07-27-2010, 07:14 PM
A good band saw (along with great care) makes all the difference and your saw (and skill) seems up to the task. I wouldn't attempt such a cut with any sort of hand saw myself, but I'm old and shaky....and lazy.

JimConlin
07-27-2010, 10:37 PM
Nice!

BobW
07-28-2010, 12:55 AM
Very nice work.

David G
07-28-2010, 12:58 AM
[QUOTE=David G;2668986]

As you know, having the right tool makes all the difference. /QUOTE]

I've often heard uttered, in my saner though no less reckless youth, that only a poor craftman blames his tools or lack there of.

Am I only having a phantom memory moment or is there a grain of truth to that saying?

Mind you, Good Sir David G., you are beyond reproach in my books.


Cheers!

Peter

My Dear Mr. Lemonhands,

You should read those books to my sweetie <G> Now... mind you... today is our 25th wedding anniversary, and she was full of an even greater than normal amount of praise and sweetness. But it is not always thus. Sometimes she forgets (only momentarily, but sometimes those moments last for days) how very, very lucky she is, and utters the merest hint of a cross word... or even - as unlikely as it sounds - a phrase of reproach.

As for tools and craftsmen -- you know as well as I that the grain of truth behind that old chestnut is not enough to bake a baguette. It's true that those of us who've been around a woodshop for a while can usually figure out a way to accomplish a task - even given the most rudimentary or crappy of tools.

It's also true that I would not have wanted to attempt that scarf with only a dull, rusty, kinked, old Harbor Freight handsaw to work with!!! The job would likely have gotten done. The question is - would it have gotten done before the building itself caught fire from the heat of my cursing. Or perhaps I'd have given up in frustration and turned my efforts to the easier task of sawing open my wrists. It'd have been close. Very close. I LOVE nice tools. Of course we're speaking strictly theoretically. In reality, I'd have redesigned the job, or turned it down <G>

sdowney717
07-28-2010, 06:07 AM
That is an interesting fix.
For me, thinking on how to cut without a bandsaw and knowing epoxy likes rough wood to grab and stick better I think I would
carefully mark out female end
use a circular saw or table saw and cut it on both sides top and bottom
If it did not cut thru all the way, then finish off with a hand saw.
Do the same with the male end.