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View Full Version : Stihl Chainsaw Brake Problem



Paul Pless
07-23-2010, 12:51 PM
Stihl MS 270 with a 20" bar.

Chain, bar, sprocket, and clutch in excellent condition. Bar oil-er working correctly.

My problem is that the brake remains engaged. If I remove the bar then I can reset the brake and the rear sprocket will turn properly. Yet as soon as I replace the bar the brake re-engages.

Thoughts?

Pugwash
07-23-2010, 01:18 PM
I would leave it as it is, until the threat of dismemberment has passed.

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
07-23-2010, 01:31 PM
Have you tried asking a professional engineer - try a diamond grit file as a bribe.

Garret
07-23-2010, 01:58 PM
Check out http://www.stihlusa.com/chainsaws/chain_brake.html.

Some Stihls are designed to engage it if your hand is off the rear handle. Maybe something is gunked up in the linkage? A nail file would be the perfect tool for cleaning it..... Or carb cleaner & a toothbrush. NO! Not hers!!!!! :d

gibetheridge
07-23-2010, 06:06 PM
The brake is disengaged by pulling back on the actuating arm. Sometimes it takes a bit of force.

I'm a fairly rugged type, have worked with chainsaws all of my life, and have found that so long as I keep a good grip on the saw with both hands and pay attention to what I'm doing I can avoid most kickbacks and over power the ones that happen anyway, which is to say that I have removed the anti kickback assembly from all of my saws.

Garret
07-23-2010, 06:20 PM
The brake is disengaged by pulling back on the actuating arm. Sometimes it takes a bit of force.

I'm a fairly rugged type, have worked with chainsaws all of my life, and have found that so long as I keep a good grip on the saw with both hands and pay attention to what I'm doing I can avoid most kickbacks and over power the ones that happen anyway, which is to say that I have removed the anti kickback assembly from all of my saws.

Key word is most....

However - this isn't anti-kickback - it's after-kickback & I had a chain brake save my life once.

A chain brake has zero effect on how well the saw cuts - so why not use it? Real men don't? Anti-kickback bars & chains I remove immediately, as they do impair performance. Years ago I bought 4 (then optional) chain brakes for Jonsered saws. Put one on my saw & the other 3 on friend's saws - at no charge (except maybe a beer or 2). Figured $25 was some real cheap insurance to save a friend's life.

Why would you ever remove a chain brake?????

katey
07-23-2010, 06:21 PM
I -may- have the same problem. It came back from being sharpened with the chain not turning. Fiddling with the brake didn't help. I'm wondering if they tightened the chain tension so much that it won't budge, but I haven't looked into that yet.

Paul Pless
07-23-2010, 06:21 PM
The brake is disengaged by pulling back on the actuating arm. Sometimes it takes a bit of force. Yeah I get that.
I'm a fairly rugged type, have worked with chainsaws all of my life, and have found that so long as I keep a good grip on the saw with both hands and pay attention to what I'm doing I can avoid most kickbacks and over power the ones that happen anyway, which is to say that I have removed the anti kickback assembly from all of my saws.I'm 6'4" - 250 and have worked with chainsaws all my life as well. I actually kinda like the brake to tell the truth. I don't experience many kickbacks and mostly can overpower the ones that do occur; but if you've cut any amount of trees then there's been a moment or two that you've experienced the type of kickback that occurs when a tree is abind and your cut frees ithat energy. That's when its nice to have the extra layer of safety. Until today, I've never found the Stihl brake intrusive. . .

Paul Pless
07-23-2010, 06:24 PM
So. . . back to my problem.

After a liberal cleaning with starter fluid and katherine's toothbrush...


No seriously I disassembled the saw and reassembled it three times with the same outcome; after I put it together the third time I was gonna drop it off at the stihl dealer down the road when I chose to crank it one last time - and you guessed it. . . it works perfectly now.

gibetheridge
07-23-2010, 06:33 PM
"Yeah I get that."

Kinda figured you knew that, that was just in case. I'm not familiar with that saw, there may be some inner workings I'm not aware of. Are you certain that it's the brake that's hanging things up? Have you checked the groove all the way around? Does the chain get caught on something, perhaps something in the cover? I can't think of anything else. I know you're not stupid, just trying to think of what could cause the brake to engage when you reassemble the saw and not coming up with anything. With no brakes on my saws I've never experienced that.

Sorry if I insulted you, here's some consolation. I'm listening to music and having a late lunch.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4FDm_iqPf2w&feature=related



You were posting while I was typing.

Garret
07-23-2010, 06:38 PM
So. . . back to my problem.

After a liberal cleaning with starter fluid and katherine's toothbrush...


No seriously I disassembled the saw and reassembled it three times with the same outcome; after I put it together the third time I was gonna drop it off at the stihl dealer down the road when I chose to crank it one last time - and you guessed it. . . it works perfectly now.

Ah - ether - so the evidence would evaporate quickly. Brilliant! Now just hope she doesn't notice the stains....

Maybe the saw's computerized? After all, a computer is the only device I know where you can repeat the same actions 3 times & get 3 different results.

Glad to hear it's working. I get pissy when mine isn't. If yours has that secondary connection to the back grip, I'd suspect that - because it'd have to be very sensitive to work I'd think.

Bobby of Tulsa
07-23-2010, 06:39 PM
Chainsaw from Hell whoda thunk. :):)

Paul Pless
07-23-2010, 06:45 PM
LOL

Garret
07-23-2010, 06:46 PM
as the golden rule... while holding the saw during cutting.. your left arm must be straight while holding the handlebar, while your throttle (right arm) is slightly bent to control the cutting..

Most folks are new to chainsaw.. requires these safety devices.. Many of them are stupid enough had failed to read the damned user's manual, and get hurt..

It take common sense while running the saw.. Mind the tip of bar

Well, yeah.

But I still don't get what's wrong with a chain brake. On my old Jonsered, it replaces the plastic handguard in front of the top handle. It literally is no more in the way than that. The only time I've touched it while using the saw is that one time - when I was (stupidly, I know) holding the saw above my shoulders "just to get that last little branch". The saw kicked back & the chain was stopped when it hit my hat. Scared hell outa me, but that was it.

All the rest of the time I've used the saw (20+ years now - which is why I buy a good one), the only time it's been engaged is to test it - IOW on purpose.

So - I still don't get it - what's wrong with a chain brake?

Pugwash
07-23-2010, 06:56 PM
So - I still don't get it - what's wrong with a chain brake?

Nothing.

I think there are a lot of myths handed down about chainsaws from "the olden days".

I used to work with people that punched holes in the exhaust "because it made it run better", never quite understood that either.

Garret
07-23-2010, 07:03 PM
Nothing is really wrong with them as long they're functioning properly... Most of time in my case, they're just in my way.. Like for example: Cutting stump very close to the ground, twigs or debris engaged or tripped the chain brake, making job unpleasurable to finish..

Hmmm... Never had mine get in the way - even cutting a stump with an old root chain (where I'm cutting as much dirt as wood). Yours must be a different design.

However - you did point out where you think one is a pain - so thanks!

Ron Williamson
07-23-2010, 07:19 PM
....and you might seize the engine from overscavenging and lack of lube.

The other golden rule is to keep your thumbs wrapped around the grips.

I've re-assembled my saws(husqvarnas) with the brake band slightly cock-eyed, which bound things up temporarily.
I like chain brakes.
R

Garret
07-23-2010, 07:27 PM
Poulan I have here is a bit touchy on chain brake.. ya can sneeze and it's tripped...

I perferred to use "old school saws" with dogs (spikes) attached for droppin' trees and cuttin' large logs, one with brake for limbin' and cuttin' firewood

Mine would bruise your hand if you tripped it. Probably something between yours & mine would be best....

I added good-sized dogs to my saw - makes all the difference.

Mrleft8
07-23-2010, 09:28 PM
You have a 20" bar on a 270? Kinda like Joe towing his boat with his GEO metro init?......

Paul Pless
07-23-2010, 09:30 PM
You have a 20" bar on a 270? Kinda like Joe towing his boat with his GEO metro init?......no its really nothing like that at all

Paul Pless
07-23-2010, 11:00 PM
I have larger and smaller saws than the 270.

This will be my next saw though I think: 7 pounds, 2 HP.

http://www.stihlusa.com/graphics/chainsaws/MS200T.gif

not cheap though

Garret
07-23-2010, 11:19 PM
I have larger and smaller saws than the 270.

This will be my next saw though I think: 7 pounds, 2 HP.

not cheap though

Good tools ain't. Worth it in the long run though.