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Flitch
07-18-2010, 08:48 PM
Hey Guys,
I woke up ambitious for a Sunday morning and made a skylight today. I won't even try to pass myself off as more than a course wood worker but I'm happy with my results. Enjoy the pics.
Flitch

I started by ripping a length of 1 1/2" copper pipe in half with the saw turned backwards on my table saw.

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4098/4806512687_62462f8d3b.jpg

Then I glued up a basic skylight... clear western larch and douglas fir with a very unique piece on the top... I call it "Damascus" Douglas fir on account of the wild layers of grain.
http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4119/4806521483_da5de8eed0.jpg

Following refreshment hour, I attached my "half-pipes" and carried on...
http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4080/4807146818_7a1d4a613c.jpg

I had some lexan glass standing by:
http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4095/4807149738_e5b0f7da08_b.jpg

Flitch
07-18-2010, 08:49 PM
http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4080/4806529083_eac4268493_b.jpg

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4114/4807151458_593f489d81_b.jpg
And thats her.
Flitch

Flitch
07-18-2010, 08:52 PM
I am left wondering if I want to do something about the rain water that will collect in the recess above the glass on the lower side of the windows. It will pool there. Maybe as much as 1/4 cup per window... I caulked the windows into the dados I cut but should I try to let this water drain somehow? Hmmmmm.
Flitch

willmarsh3
07-18-2010, 08:54 PM
That's quite awesome. If I ever need to build one this will inspire me.

ben2go
07-18-2010, 09:34 PM
I am left wondering if I want to do something about the rain water that will collect in the recess above the glass on the lower side of the windows. It will pool there. Maybe as much as 1/4 cup per window... I caulked the windows into the dados I cut but should I try to let this water drain somehow? Hmmmmm.
Flitch

Maybe carve some small recess at the corners of the windows or maybe a small recess directly in the middle shaped like a wine glass.Looks great the way it is.

ben2go
07-18-2010, 09:40 PM
Nice lookin wood that top piece. I think it's gonna leak , what the plan to seal the sides and bottom from capillary action happening?

A rabbited frame / inter-locking joint would have been better I'd think. We'll see what the experts say. I'm just a carpenter , not a "vaulted" shipwright, but I see issues with that design.

It'd make a nice chicken brooder though!

He could run P seal around the inside, with the top of the P sticking up an 1/8th of an inch for the window frames to seal against.Small latches would hold them closed in rough weather.

http://www.epm.com/extrusion_pseal_hollow.htm

Flitch
07-18-2010, 09:42 PM
Capillary action? This assembly actually sits on a 1x12 red cedar box glassed into the top deck so its up high and dry and I would hope the 10 - 12 coats of spar varnish would take care of any capillary action. The joints are glued with 3m 3200 and screwed together.
Flitch

redbopeep
07-18-2010, 09:50 PM
Lovely skylight. What's it going on? You're right that the water will sit on the glass and probably leak. Our skylights have the glass glazed in so that it is flush with the wood. It floats on a bed of silicone caulk that also surrounds the glass about 1/8" all around. I've seen a skylight like yours with two nifty little surface drainage ditches--one on each lower corner of the frame/glass interface. Yours can't really do that, I don't think. We have weep holes on the outside of the framing of our companionway doors. Can't see how you'd do that either though. Some bright shipwright will be along shortly to let us know how yours will work. In the meanwhile--lovely, lovely, lovely. And, if that pretty cool graining isn't to become difficult for you...CPES or Woodlife Clear...either will seal the variety of graining going on there.

Lovely :)

htom
07-18-2010, 10:01 PM
There's a corner where the Lexan meets the wood along the lower edge; plane that corner down until the surface there is parallel with the deck (or just a bit downhill to the deck.) Water runs down the glass, over the caulking, onto a flat. Motion of the boat dumps the drops. On the underside of the frame, cut drip-stop groves the length of the frame. Water runs over the edge, works its way back up and inside.

oznabrag
07-18-2010, 10:26 PM
It looks nice, Flitch!

One thing...It's been my experience that 'wild' grain like that looks nice, but it's really weak. I hope you never have occasion to test that theory!

Looks great!

Don Kurylko
07-18-2010, 10:32 PM
Well Flitch, the general consensus is that ALL skylights leak, eventually; so just make a nice canvass cover for it with Mylar “windows” and be done with it. What you did in a day took me weeks and will probably leak too, even though it’s got all the bells and whistles and shouldn’t. Well done!

Flitch
07-18-2010, 10:43 PM
No worries about it being weak. I ran an 8/4 pc of fir narrow edge up for the length of it under my "grainy" piece. I stood on it today with my 200 lbs. to demonstrate that fact. I am thinking about a couple or three pieces of 3/8 copper tubing on each window to drain any water away from the lower edge of the glass. Oh and I will put some weather stripping between the windows and the main assembly. I have some nice 1 1/2" stuff made for canadian winters. Its going on my top deck above my galley which I already boxed in.
Flitch

Jay Greer
07-19-2010, 06:13 PM
Nice lookin wood that top piece. I think it's gonna leak , what the plan to seal the sides and bottom from capillary action happening?

A rabbited frame / inter-locking joint would have been better I'd think. We'll see what the experts say. I'm just a carpenter , not a "vaulted" shipwright, but I see issues with that design.

It'd make a nice chicken brooder though!
I must confess that I agree with you. He has gone to a lot of effort to build it, and he is asking for our approval. I regret having to criticise his work, but a bit of time doing research could have saved him from leaks and other problems in the future. The most important consideration when building an opening penta roof skylite is to allow the edges of the frames to overhang a bit and to make sure that there is a drip groove in them that clears the box all the way around. Failing to do this will, most likely, result in capillary leakage. Another trick is to bury a bonze interlocking strip in the box that presses against a weather strip seal in the lid section when the tops are closed. And, mitered corners do not belong on a boat. They leak. They open up in a short time and turn dark under the finish. They nearly always are a source of rot.

The butt joints of the box will propably leak as well and allow dark stains to develop at the joints. A better choice would have been a blind rabbeted half tennon or tennon rabbeted into a corner post construction as it is the best way to secure the corners of the box. Dovetails while appealing to the eye have a nasty habit of leaking as well. Even so, I do like the look of dovetails for skylight box corners. A good mechanic can nearly always insure a good fit. Modern adhesives can be a boon for this kind of work.

Again, I regret my harsh comments. But the guys I learned from were far less tactfull or easy on my ego. This is how you learn about boat building!
Jay

nautiguy
07-19-2010, 06:51 PM
A quick fix for the glass to frame problem might be to carefully add some glaziers putty at a constant angle in the right angle seam so that water won't pool.
I'm not sure how well a drip stop will work since the panels are cut flush with the frame. The moisture from the drip stop will fall right on the top of the frame and migrate in that way.

Norm

Jay Greer
07-20-2010, 09:42 AM
Here is a shot of a skylight made by one of the master mechanics at Aberking and Rasmussen. The boat is a Concordia Yawl. Note that the butterflys over hang the box frame and are bull nosed. There is also a drip groove under them.
Jayhttp://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a0d901b3127ccefafd2298fbaf00000040O00QYsmrNy5bsQ e3nwg/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/

nedL
07-20-2010, 11:23 AM
Politely stated Jay, and all very valid.

Brian Palmer
07-20-2010, 11:52 AM
Sorry for the drift, but is there anything under that anchor to keep it from coming out of the chocks holding the cross piece for the flukes?

Brian

Jay Greer
07-20-2010, 12:16 PM
Brian, that is a very astute question. Logicly there should be provision to keep it in place. If the boat is in the Festival again this year, I will check it out.
Jay