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View Full Version : Rita Splashed, (finally!)



Lew Barrett
07-14-2010, 06:59 PM
A long and hard working haulout with a little something for everyone;
Something for the shipwrights (4 planks, damn!)
Something for Fisheries Supply (paint, cotton, seam compounds, epoxy)
Something for me: a fresh boat with a clean bill of health.

She's taking up and getting hard now, as we were out for 2 weeks in mostly warm weather there was a bit of water when she was splashed. I am not used to her taking on water lately but she did this time. The marginal 2 strap Travel lift was not a help, but she's a tough enough girl.

I'm happy with this paint job, I must say, but it just about whooped me. I've been going for 5 weeks straight on this and it feels good to be moving along. Apologies for using a couple of the photos previously; this is the "we're splashed" thread so I hope I am forgiven for that. There are a lot more photos but I have to save some for later use.

Time to go boating!


http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff76/LewBarrett/Rita%20images/stbdside.jpg
A lot of prep and sanding resulted in a spotted boat; desert camo


http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff76/LewBarrett/Rita%20images/crop.jpg
Paint going on (there is a pleasant image in the reflections for the keen eyed)

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff76/LewBarrett/Rita%20images/endotheday.jpg
So much for trying to be neat! Thanks for the ladle tip Jay!:D

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff76/LewBarrett/Rita%20images/onthelift2.jpg
Out of there finally!

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff76/LewBarrett/Rita%20images/Onthelift1.jpg
They always look bigger out of the water

Lew Barrett
07-14-2010, 07:00 PM
http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff76/LewBarrett/Rita%20images/onthelift3.jpg
Going home!

Yea, it's all over until I start again!

Garret
07-14-2010, 07:03 PM
Hot damn!

She's looking beeyootiful, Lew. Happy voyages -

Garret

PS: Multiply your planks x 10 to get to what I have to do...... These old gals ain't cheap or easy, but they sure are worth it when they splash.

Lew Barrett
07-14-2010, 07:06 PM
I hate it when the old wood goes thud. You have my complete sympathy Garret. I have to remind myself what I always tell others; it's a process.

Wooden Boat Fittings
07-14-2010, 07:10 PM
Well, I was about to say, "Let me be the first to congratulate you" Lew, but I see Garret has beaten me to it. So let me be the second.

She sure looks great (especially those cabin hooks....)

Mike

C. Ross
07-14-2010, 07:39 PM
Very nice! She looks really pretty. So does Rita.

Paul Pless
07-14-2010, 07:45 PM
You do great by her Lew!

David G
07-14-2010, 08:37 PM
Simply Maaaaahhhvellllus, Daaaahhhhling!

Canoez
07-14-2010, 08:47 PM
Congrats, Lew! Rita is looking fresh and pretty again - you guys really do take great care of that boat.

Lew Barrett
07-14-2010, 08:55 PM
Very nice! She looks really pretty. So does Rita.

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff76/LewBarrett/Rita%20images/Like1.jpg
And here is a photo of the same lovely young lady sans nez! :D

JPhoenix
07-14-2010, 09:23 PM
Just in time - gonna be a gorgeous weekend - again!

Very nice Lew!!!

Ed Harrow
07-14-2010, 09:28 PM
Nice work - now all I need to do is get out to Seattle again... (Do I know her? Hard to tell in the reflection)

chuckt
07-14-2010, 09:47 PM
Lew, I am poking around your threads for the details on your recipe for that finish. Haven't found it yet. Care to help me out?

StevenBauer
07-14-2010, 09:54 PM
Beauty, Lew. I hope to have some similar pictures in a few days.



Steven

L.W. Baxter
07-14-2010, 09:55 PM
You do great by her Lew!

Man alive, no kidding!

chas
07-14-2010, 10:57 PM
There was some talk about headin' north. I'm waiting to hear about that. Thea Foss seems to be hanging around here lately; perhaps some other Seattle boats are heading this way? / Jim

perldog007
07-14-2010, 11:28 PM
Congratulations, she's lovely, boat's not bad either.

Jay Greer
07-14-2010, 11:41 PM
Awsome Lew!
Jay

wizbang 13
07-14-2010, 11:43 PM
Big Job, feels smaller in the past ,no?

54 Conqueror
07-15-2010, 12:14 AM
Lew, she looks fantastic!!

I was going to try and get over to see her in progress, but my "little project" turned out a little larger than expected and I am still knee deep in it. (surprise).

Absolutely beautiful!!

Soundman67
07-15-2010, 12:22 AM
Any more pics you care to share of that lovely boat and your work on her this year would be greatly appreciated. Beautiful lines. I cant even imagine what it takes to keep that hull faired out that nice.

John B
07-15-2010, 12:59 AM
Great to see as usual Lew, beautiful.
We hauled on tuesday after 4 days away... the job list was small, new cutlass in the shaft log and evaluate the antifoul.... Its expanded.:rolleyes:

P.L.Lenihan
07-15-2010, 01:29 AM
Fantastic good job there Lew!! I'm loving your hull colour even more than before.Amazing how that colour changes ever so in different lighting.

Oh,before I forget, reflections can be such a tease! Will we be graced with a photo or two,sans reflection effect?

Cheers!


Peter,stuck humming the Beatles Lovely Rita over-n-over now...............

Tom Freeman
07-15-2010, 02:15 AM
When you asked if I wanted to help paint, you should have told me more about the rest of the crew. :)

Lovely work.

Lew Barrett
07-15-2010, 03:39 AM
Thank you all so much; I am flattered and pleased. This was a very extensive prep job with some experimental (for me) stuff that all seems mostly to have worked out.

I will write a bit tomorrow about the ups and downs and there were both. The boat took 4 bottom planks (all 75 year old wood) and a topsides plank (which is a particular drag when you are focused on paint as I will discuss), and that was distracting....and annoying and disappointing! So there's a story there and also a story behind the chemistry of the job, but it's very late so later for that! All of this gets covered in my column next month but I am more than just a little happy to share it with you guys in a different form. It is a kick to have each and every one of you, all worthy crafts person and sailors, enjoy my work as much as I am wowed by yours.

An aside and then to bed:

Aulikki (Spindrift) and her husband Dave are as many of you know, on their way to Bellingham tomorrow. Spin emailed me (from the road?) and I was able to convince her to turn around and drive an hour back down I-5 (in rush hour!) to stay here. So we all spent the night eating, drinking and talking (mostly me). I showed them everything we own, and then we spent an hour looking at the Art of The Motorcycle book together. That was so great! Tomorrow we will go to Fisheries Supply and see Rita, then they leave to meet up with Orca where they splash her and head north.. It has been great to meet them and host them as they embark on this big dream voyage! This forum is so amazing for it's "connectedness."

Yah, there are more pictures! Taking a lesson from the great master of drama (P.I. L...Peter that's you!) I'll string this thread out for all that can be achieved by a paint job :D

P.L.Lenihan
07-15-2010, 04:03 AM
Yah, there are more pictures! Taking a lesson from the great master of drama (P.I. L...Peter that's you!) I'll string this thread out for all that can be achieved by a paint job :D

Yer a wicked one,ya is Mr.Barrett, but we loves ya jest the same!!:D


Cheers!


Peter

redbopeep
07-15-2010, 04:10 AM
Awsome, lovely boat :)

snow(Alan H)
07-15-2010, 04:21 AM
Lew

WoW - that is some finish. The people who thought about buying her but lacked vision will be kicking themselves when they see her now. She truly is spectacular - hows 'Meter Maid'? you will have to share the love around.

What did you use on the brightwork? - I have just finished doing the teak trim & Oregon mast on RainDance with the new Kiwi wonder product 'Uroxsys'. I have my fingers crossed it will give me 4>5 years. Most of the classic yachts that have been restored down under in the last 4 years have used (trialed) Uroxsys on their mast/spars & are raving about the performance.

http://www.uroxsys.co.nz/marine.htm

We are having an 'indian winter down here - stunning weather - supported by the fact that I'm sanding & bright finishing exterior trim in the middle of winter.

Again well done on Rita - you must be sleeping happy tonight.

Alan (snow)

8.30 a.m. photos from the iPhone

http://i408.photobucket.com/albums/pp165/Alanh22/IMG_3323.jpg;

http://i408.photobucket.com/albums/pp165/Alanh22/IMG_3316.jpg

JimD
07-15-2010, 04:23 AM
Thanks for the update, Lew. I had never seen pics of Rita out of the water before and did not realize she has twin screws. I'll try to pay more attention next time.

dhic001
07-15-2010, 05:25 AM
Excellent stuff, well done that man, superb looking job. Trouble is you'll be scared to use it now! Wish I was that close to being afloat again, but I'm about as far away as I'm going to be.
Daniel

MiddleAgesMan
07-15-2010, 05:59 AM
Very nice job, Lew, on a very very nice boat. I seem to recall her topsides have always been white but that looks to be a more creamy color....?

ron ll
07-15-2010, 07:51 AM
Beautiful work Lew. I bet you are both happy and exhausted. Hope to see you on the water soon. (I guess I accidentally poofed my earlier post, not sure how.) I understand the frustration with a new topsides plank and a paintjob of that quality. That new plank will probably take a year to settle down.

Peter Malcolm Jardine
07-15-2010, 08:56 AM
Ah yes, I feel your pain before those pics.... I am still in the midst of a complete topside paint and varnish ... pulled all the hardware... I am on coat 6 of varnish.

Great Job, as usual... I will look forward to the rest of the pictures.

paladin
07-15-2010, 02:58 PM
Nice...Lew....

davidagage
07-15-2010, 06:56 PM
Just gorgeous Lew...

Lew Barrett
07-16-2010, 12:48 PM
A word about "why:"

The underlying why of this job was to develop a strategy for avoiding problems borne of iron fasteners that were starting to poke through on the topsides.

Everyone with a boat fastened this way has wished for a cure to bleeders and proud plugs at one time or another. So that's what the following is about, the few easy techniques that have been developed by friends and
other keepers that I stole for this job.

First is the hole cleaning tool. I have spoken about this tool before, but a picture is worth a thousand words. Here are two pictures that illustrate how to clean an existing fastener head in about 4 seconds.

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff76/LewBarrett/Rita%20images/HOLETOOL.jpg
"Hole cleaning tool" illustrated (trick courtesy Chuck Roose via Andy Blair)

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff76/LewBarrett/Rita%20images/plugcleaninuse.jpg
Tool in use

It couldn't be simpler. Using this dumb system, the rust or oxidation is immediately removed from the fastener head. This may be followed by a swab of osphoric acid. When dried, a swab of cpes is overlaid on the top of the fastener as well. Or you can use some paint, varnish, shellac or (as we did) Blue Seal. Or a combination of these sealers. Then a plug is inserted and fixed in your preferred fashion. At that point you migt have something that looks like this:

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff76/LewBarrett/Rita%20images/plugsinbow-1.jpg
Pt bow of Rita with plugs waiting to be flushed. I didn't keep count. Maybe I did 500 tiny individual repairs of this sort. It was tedious. The smearing along the hull is where I wiped off excess CPES and "Blue Seal" while it was still wet as I didn't want that stuff getting in the way of later sanding efforts.



After the plugs were cut flush (using another Jay Greer trick; the flush cutting saw) any chipping is very carefully filled with fairing epoxy. We used Restore-it, Interlux and Silver Tip somewhat interchangeably. I have a small preference for the Interlux product as a result of my experiences here, but they are all more alike than they are different.

Ready for paint, treated plugs look like this. You work on them until you can feel absolutely no difference between the boat and the plug. These have been hit with spray primer as well, hence they look a bit "cloudy." As it happens, that was unnecessary as the painters applied a complete split coat when I pulled the "let's paint" trigger.

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff76/LewBarrett/Rita%20images/plugdetAIL.jpg

Here are my two volunteer helpers:
http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff76/LewBarrett/Rita%20images/Andy.jpg
Andy Blair, my great friend who helps paint my boat and shows up selflessly at all haul outs and for whom I will always do the same.

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff76/LewBarrett/Rita%20images/johnny.jpg
Johnny Robbins my (very informally) "adopted son" who works alongside me when he has time.

Both of the above guys took on all the lousy jobs that need doing: sanding, bottom paint, seam paying, crawling along on your belly, whatever might be needed as we went along. Kudos and extreme gratitude to them; I would still be out if it was just me doing this.
And to suggest that they only did grunt work is very short shrift. Andy owns and maintains Glayva, a 1938 39 foot cruiser, and deserved winner of many accolades, and Johnny is a skilled carpenter and painter himself.

chuckt
07-16-2010, 12:51 PM
I am reading into your posts a promise to decribe how you acheived your masterpeice . Don't be like my mum who won't give my wife her best recipes. :D

chuckt
07-16-2010, 12:53 PM
LOL! You started the story apparently at the same time I was typing the above message--but don't stop there!

Lew Barrett
07-16-2010, 01:14 PM
Everything was cruising nicely along until I discovered a problem.


http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff76/LewBarrett/Rita%20images/Easytofind.jpg

The purpose of this exercise was to avoid this sort of thing in the future, but you have to fix what you find. It's pretty clear to anybody who cared to look that there was a problem here.
Fortunately it didn't invade the neighboring butt but John Thomas cut it back a bay just to be safe.

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff76/LewBarrett/Rita%20images/topsideplank.jpg We hoped that was the end of the trouble, but if you look in the red, you might see something ominous just in line with John's head; surveyor's chalk marks. I no longer do planking, so this represented a setback in every way; of the paint job, and to the wallet.

More to come.

Soundman67
07-16-2010, 01:20 PM
so to cure the weeping iron fasteners you clean then seal then plug? Do you use varnish to set the plugs? I am not familiar with blue seal. going to have to google it now. My boat uses boat nails to fasten and a lot of the plugs are weaping rust. I was considering replacing those ones with bronze screws. I am pretty sure that is what has been used on all the replanking that has been done. I am concerned about getting the original fasteners out without damage though.

jboats
07-16-2010, 01:39 PM
Beautiful job on a beautiful boat - thanks for sharing the story Lew.

Soundman67
07-16-2010, 01:55 PM
Just saw the start of the planking. Looks like a bit more than a little surprise. Cant wait for more.

peter radclyffe
07-16-2010, 02:35 PM
miss awlgrip 2010 eh, thanks Lew

Tom Freeman
07-16-2010, 02:42 PM
Maybe when Lew gets to the end of his story, I'll post the full bikini shot of his assistant painter from Bell Street last year. That should drive the views up on the thread! :)

snow(Alan H)
07-16-2010, 03:16 PM
Maybe when Lew gets to the end of his story, I'll post the full bikini shot of his assistant painter from Bell Street last year. That should drive the views up on the thread! :)

And maybe speed up the posting - he is serializing this story i.e. a little bit each day

Lew Barrett
07-16-2010, 03:43 PM
so to cure the weeping iron fasteners you clean then seal then plug? Do you use varnish to set the plugs? I am not familiar with blue seal. going to have to google it now. My boat uses boat nails to fasten and a lot of the plugs are weaping rust. I was considering replacing those ones with bronze screws. I am pretty sure that is what has been used on all the replanking that has been done. I am concerned about getting the original fasteners out without damage though.

The plugs are set dry (sort of he lied) but the truth is that the blue seal probably has at least some hold on them as it didn't reach full cure before we reset the plugs. Also almost every plug got a fairing epoxy overlay. But I would gladly use paint or varnish on topside plugs presuming they were tight fitting to begin with. That was not always the case for our holes and where a plug was not going back into a perfect hole it got 'glued' in (uncured blue seal) and faired over. What else can you do?


Don't be too concerned about never having heard of Blue Seal; neither had I!


This (http://bluesealinc.com/) was given to me by David Wiehle, the painter (more of him anon). He stopped by while I was still in the water and gave me a good amount of this (rather expensive) product with a thumbnail description of how to use it; as follows:

Mix very small amounts; whatever you can use in about 10-15 minutes. A glue brush very carefully loaded is used to put the mix on the head of the fastener, following the cleaning, ospho and CPES treatment. I suppose you could pass on the CPES if you were using this, or this if you are using CPES. I used what is referred to in an old joke as "the two bag" system" on the theory that you can't seal an iron fastener too much; you know...you have a back up if one of the bags breaks!

I would not want the job of removing boat nails from the topsides while trying not to damage the planking. If I were a betting man I would bet on the side of the guys who say "it can't be done" (in sufficient numbers to make a difference). It is hard enough getting this many plugs out without too much chipping and hole buggering, never mind the nails beneath. In Rita's case, the fasteners are good. Only the oxidation seems to push the plugs out and it doesn't take much to dislodge a plug. If you can stop that from happening, I think you can buy a lot of time.

Will the Blue Seal be the answer? We shall find out.

Lew Barrett
07-16-2010, 03:49 PM
Serial posting yeah Alan.:)

I am still busy with the remains of this job and a mini refit including new batteries and some window trim work. Cosmetics are done for this year though. Lindy and I are heading to a surprise party in California (I think I can say this online; she doesn't follow WBF to my knowledge!) for my oldest daughter and I want the boat to be ready to go within a few days of when we get home.

Tom; do the Liz photos. I don't have too many more and we probably won't see her in a bikini again anytime soon as (I'm sorry to report) they took a melanoma from her a few weeks ago so she won't be sunning the way she used to.

She humored me by painting in shorts and halter but that's Liz for ya.

Chuck, I will be happy to discuss the mix of tricks here as this thing unwinds. There's nothing new, just the mix we used.

Ross M
07-16-2010, 04:22 PM
Rita is so beautiful her maintenance should be considered public service.

And here is a third for Liz photos <G>

Lew Barrett
07-16-2010, 05:00 PM
Chuck; there is nothing terribly special about the paint. It is Easypoxy Grand Banks Beige on top, and Interlux Brightsides Dark Blue for the boot.

Some Penetrol (about 10% but really to feel) is the brushing extender. That's it. The paint was hardly thinned, just a literal splash of T120 (maybe not even that) and no 333 on the boot. Both of those are the recommended system thinners for their respective paints. But I took no say in the mix for the topsides, anymore than I would tell John Thomas how to spile a plank.
One certainly has every right to ask questions and suggest methods of work, but frankly these people work at the very top of their trades. I am more interested in learning from them than they should be in listening to me!

So for the first time Rita got painted with Penetrol; something I had been curious about but very reluctant to try for years.
Well, blow me down. It works great. Everything, including the boot, was rolled and tipped. I used my 3" Purdy and small Tiz rollers, and David used 7" Tiz and a 3" Corona.

David "structures" the paint. Liz rolls it on evenly and they yak at each other the whole time; very entertaining. Liz's language is extremely colorful and Dave dishes it right back. The talking never stops and all the arms are also constantly in motion.
David first brushes the paint out horizontally, paying extra attention to what is happening at the top under the rails; giving them an extra sweep every time. The he pulls the paint down vertically. This is exactly what I was taught to do, minus the horizontal structuring (what Rebecca Whitman might call "working in plaid").

I don't think there is any way you could get the wet edge time this takes without the Penetrol. That's one key. The stuff levels like crazy.

As for the difference between Brightsides and Easypoxy: Brightsides definitely flows better, no doubt in my mind now. However, as it seems more translucent, it also seems not to cover as well. If coverage is important, I'd say the Easypoxy is better. If flow and gloss are what you need, the Brightsides seems a bit better in those categories. Both are excellent products, and as I like a good gloss but don't fancy two packs, I think either of these is a good paint in the modern idiom of a shiny paint job. You have to want a gloss finish or these are the wrong products.

As one of the forum traditionalists, it is something of a surprise for me to find myself agog over Penetrol. But the results speak for themselves.

Tom Freeman
07-16-2010, 05:24 PM
Ask and you shall receive. Here is my vote for the "People's Choice" award from last years Bell Street Classic weekend.

http://fqafnq.bay.livefilestore.com/y1p-ZbuxoM76XjW_lBwyoJenFWMGtW0NDfVT0MK2xRN9q1jV8ME_8u KJqRu9tToXOo_lvrvQN7gKrWFJfjO_aMeA3xFNpNi8U1h/Bell%20Street%20Rendezvous%20035.jpg?psid=1

Lew Barrett
07-16-2010, 05:56 PM
That is what I am talking about! Thank you Tom. Liz is not shy, personality to match.

That is taken on their Chris Craft, Pearl.

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff76/LewBarrett/Rita%20images/LIZ3.jpg
I am about out of photos taken while painting. Saving one more for later.

pcford
07-16-2010, 09:23 PM
Ask and you shall receive. Here is my vote for the "People's Choice" award from last years Bell Street Classic weekend.

http://fqafnq.bay.livefilestore.com/y1p-ZbuxoM76XjW_lBwyoJenFWMGtW0NDfVT0MK2xRN9q1jV8ME_8u KJqRu9tToXOo_lvrvQN7gKrWFJfjO_aMeA3xFNpNi8U1h/Bell%20Street%20Rendezvous%20035.jpg?psid=1

uhhhhhh, Lew...I don't know how she paints but she is certainly better looking than Kim Lazare.

(And by the way, why does a guy like you have such good looking women about? (Daughters, wife, help? Mysterious.)

Peter Malcolm Jardine
07-16-2010, 09:24 PM
yeah yeah Girl bikini girl...:D

hmmm... interesting observations...I don't usually use penetrol on varnish, but i have used it in paint, and I found similiar things, but thought maybe I was imagining things... good to hear definitive evidence. Yep, I like easypoxy for covering... I use it on Vanora's cabin and trim. I did use two part Interlux on the hull, and I find it very very abrasion resistant and gloss retentive.

Thanks for the thread... cool... and very good work by those folks, and you.

snow(Alan H)
07-16-2010, 10:45 PM
Ask and you shall receive. Here is my vote for the "People's Choice" award from last years Bell Street Classic weekend.

http://fqafnq.bay.livefilestore.com/y1p-ZbuxoM76XjW_lBwyoJenFWMGtW0NDfVT0MK2xRN9q1jV8ME_8u KJqRu9tToXOo_lvrvQN7gKrWFJfjO_aMeA3xFNpNi8U1h/Bell%20Street%20Rendezvous%20035.jpg?psid=1

Whats the boat in the background ???

Yeah right - what background............

ron ll
07-17-2010, 12:09 AM
Peter, altho my current boat has no varnish, in the past I have used Penetrol 50/50 with Man 'o War varnish for the first coat and then gradually reducing the ratio for subsequent coats. The idea was that the first coats would penetrate into the wood more. Not sure it was a valid idea, but that was the idea.

Lew Barrett
07-17-2010, 12:35 AM
Pat I will take that as a compliment. I got lucky with all my girls, especially the one who married me. Had she but known......

Peter, it seems to me that Chris Craft do well with 2 part formulations and I believe it speaks well for them that they do. I don't know if it has to do with batten seam construction or the fact that they are usually somewhat lighter. It could be an illusion (because most CCs are grooved) or it might simply be that the good ones just move less. Perhaps as the 2 packs have become more popular they have also been formulated to be a bit more forgiving. It would be interesting to hear somebody who knew the chemistry speak to the evolution of these products but I was not ready to experiment because I would be afraid that seasonal plank movement would be a problem on Rita. She is more heavily constructed than a similarly sized Chris and I think she may be subject to more seasonal movement. Perhaps they have made the new paints more flexible but some of the old failures stick in my mind. They were pretty spectacular, and involved boats built like mine is.

On the other hand, Penetrol is now a part of my bag of tricks, so 2 packs may not be far behind. They suggest that I will be impressed that Penetrol will extend the gloss and wear qualities of the paint. I will concur or disagree with that judgment with the passage of time.

Liz and Dave are big on 2 packs and suggested that as a possibility. I shot it down as it is a "prejudice" I reserve the right to maintain. But I am open to talk. This was a very different deal for me as (I said) it's the first time somebody else brushed out the boat. No complaints and entertaining views!

Lew Barrett
07-17-2010, 01:00 PM
http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff76/LewBarrett/Rita%20images/theformula.jpg

More regarding Penetrol:

They use it in varnish, no thinner, and as you can see, they use a lot of Epifanes. I don't know why all those big cans of varnish appeared on our job but I took advantage of their presence. I tried it (varnish and Penetrol) on the spray rail having pinched a pint from them when they weren't looking, then threw in a few ozs of Penetrol and varnished the rails and transom beneath the swim step. I reckoned these were both good areas to experiment with on this boat since you barely see them up close. The stuff worked fine and set up with no visible issues by the next day. I used it with standard Epi "clear" and I will try it again when I get a chance. I suspect it is not as helpful in colder weather as (I am guessing) it extends drying time. It may also mot be useful when substrates are not compatible. In this situation, it seems to be a handy trick.

What can I say? It is more than a gimmick.

Peter Malcolm Jardine
07-17-2010, 05:49 PM
Yes, I think the batten fastening hulls on Vanora help out a lot, although she always start to deteriorate on the carvelling (lines) first... That said, the plank itself always maintains mucho gloss, even after five years or so... I suspect Rita moves a little more based on age and size too..Hey, if something is working, don't fix it, although I see a lot of the big boats done in Awlgrip.... but that is a different league. All the prep and primers blah blah blah, sprayed finish... $$$$$$

chuckt
01-16-2011, 09:10 AM
reviewing your painting info Lew. Also, taking another gander at post 50 :) --- only because of the hot Chris Craft of course--very like my boat

Lew Barrett
01-16-2011, 08:25 PM
........lso, taking another gander at post 50 :) --- only because of the hot Chris Craft of course--very like my boat

The usual reply: what Chris Craft?

This is a day for re-visitng old posts.

wizbang 13
01-16-2011, 09:01 PM
I'd be willin to try n do a stain "match up"!!!

Lew Barrett
01-16-2011, 10:58 PM
Also, taking another gander at post 50 :) --- only because of the hot Chris Craft of course--very like my boat

Another possible answer to this comment: good model :)


What a gorgeous boat. Slick!

Thanks! I'm getting a bit of extra mileage out of what was a pretty used up post! But I'm glad you like her.....

Robert Abernethy
01-19-2011, 12:20 AM
Great Job Lew.
We are looking forward to seeing her this year.

Soundman67
01-19-2011, 01:31 AM
Lew Thanks again for the thread. I am curious about how much of the easypoxy you ended up using to cover Rita. How many coats did you end up using? And which fairing compound did you use? Did you use it on the seams on the topsides too? Its hard to judge the actual cost of a paintjob without knowing how much paint and other supplies will be used. Do you think the coverage estimate on from the manufacturer was accurate?

Lew Barrett
01-19-2011, 01:32 PM
From experience I know that it takes about a fat half gallon per coat to do the boat. I always buy 6 quarts and usually have a quart plus some left over which can be handy down the road when/if repairs are needed.

I used a mix of Smiths, Interlux and Silvertip fairing epoxies because I had the Smith's and the Interlux on hand. I bought the Sys.3 epoxy as a result of scratching around on the forum to see what people were using. Probably most of the work was dome with the Interlux. I didn't spend too much time on the seams; most was spent on the plugs. Seams were cleaned, filled and blocked flat, but not what I would call "re-payed." My boat will crack out certain of the seams over a few seasons whatever I do short of grooving her or maybe entirely repaying all the seams, which strikes me as a pretty big job. If I were a younger/newer owner, I'd consider that last maybe using some of the newest flexible fairing epoxies.

Soundman67
01-19-2011, 04:10 PM
Thanks Lew, that is very valuable information. If you ever feel like it I would love to see pictures of your interior too. What I have seen in various threads shows some fantastic woodwork. And I am sure there are many hours of maintenance in there too that we would all love to see.

bahma
03-28-2011, 03:00 PM
I am long boarding the top sides of my Albury runabout. last coat was 50/50 u/coat, topside gloss and 10% penetrol. I keep coming back to Rita Splashed for inspiration. Your finish is truly fantastic. i doing my level best to match it.
Thank you for setting such a high standard.