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swampu
07-11-2010, 07:25 AM
Hello Everyone,
This is my first post and my first wooden boat. I name is Paul and I just recently bought a 65' lugger. She was struck by lighting about a month ago and burned up. I should have some burn pictures today but attached is a prefire picture. I would love any advice or guidance on the best practice and process for dealing with the fire (soot, charred wood, fixing ribs), rebuilding the systems inside the boat (water,fuel,electrical and everything else). Thanks in advance. Paul894

Bob Adams
07-11-2010, 08:21 AM
Good on you for taking this on and welcome. I was part of the restoration of a 75' Trumpy that was burned, so I may be able to offer some suggestions. Pictures dipicting the extent of damage would be a good start.

Good Luck!

mucrewbtp
07-11-2010, 08:42 AM
Paul,

Great boat, and a worthwhile project. Like bob said the more pictures of the damage you can show, the better the people here will be able to help. Also some details on the construction would help a lot as well. If you are dealing with fire damage I am assuming that some parts of the boat may be completely burned or charred to the point that using it as a pattern to make a new piece is not possible. In this case, since boat hulls and framing are generally symmetrical, you could pattern new components based off of the corrosponding components on the other side of the boat. Remember though it will be a mirror image not an exact copy.

Regards,
Mike

swampu
07-11-2010, 10:09 AM
Thanks guys, I am cleaning the boat out as much as possible right now. I should have some better pictures tomorrow evening after another good day of cleaning. A lot of the mahogany is in good shape "surprisingly" the varnish was burnt and bubbled but it flakes right off to reveal a fresh stained finish. Some of the wood is charred and will need to be removed including some ribs. The hull was c-flexed about 10 years ago. The construction is of 2" cypress planks. Do I need to go back with cypress or can I use treated? Can I just grind the wood to fresh and glass the affected area. I want to do it right because I believe the Coastguard will want to inspect the fix.

oznabrag
07-11-2010, 11:33 AM
Thanks guys, I am cleaning the boat out as much as possible right now. I should have some better pictures tomorrow evening after another good day of cleaning. A lot of the mahogany is in good shape "surprisingly" the varnish was burnt and bubbled but it flakes right off to reveal a fresh stained finish. Some of the wood is charred and will need to be removed including some ribs. The hull was c-flexed about 10 years ago. The construction is of 2" cypress planks. Do I need to go back with cypress or can I use treated? Can I just grind the wood to fresh and glass the affected area. I want to do it right because I believe the Coastguard will want to inspect the fix.

I'm guessin' you're in Biloxi?

In my opinion, the thing to do if you have concerns about a Coast Guard inspection is to give them a call after you have everything cleaned up, and see if they wouldn't mind sending someone around to let you know what they expect.

There's nothing like a little information to dispel ignorance!http://www.vbforums.com/images/smilies/biggrin.gif

mucrewbtp
07-11-2010, 10:12 PM
I would reccommend against using fiberglass to repair the hull. Traditionally built wood boats and fiberglass generally dont get along. If you just fiberglass a small area the expansion and contraction of the wood will eventually cause it to fail. If you fiberglass the whole thing the hull will dry out and become loose underneath the sheathing and begin to work and flex. This will cause small cracks in the sheathing which will let in small amounts of water which will eventually cause rot. The best approach is to repar the boat using materials and methods similar to that which were used to build the boat. You dont necessarily have to use the exact same wood that was used originally, but I would not use big box store pressure treated lumber. There are several people here who are better equipped to offer lumber suggestions, and im sure they'll chime in.

Regards,
Mike

SMARTINSEN
07-11-2010, 10:30 PM
WB # 178 starting page 40 and # 187 starting on page 49 have articles about repairing fire damage. The later, as I recall, went into details about how much charred wood could be scraped away without compromising structural integrity.

oznabrag
07-11-2010, 10:43 PM
Mike that's the best, most succinct explanation of 'Don't glass a traditional hull' I've ever seen!

So...Swampu, I'm guessin' you're in Biloxi?

A couple of things you oughtta know about. One, there's a guy in Indianola who does the recycled warehouse Longleaf thing. He's got a pretty good-sized mill.

The other is WoodMizer (http://www.woodmizer.com/corporate/About/mediacenter.aspx). Last I heard, they maintain a database of all their mills.

The reason I bring this up is that, from where I sit, cheap lumber is your ticket out of this mess! 904

Let's see...

Yup this has to be the guy.
No website.


Sonrise Enterprises Distinctive Pine Floors & Beams
Indianola, MS
(662) 887-4700
(662) 207-2298

The people I know who have dealt with him tell me that he's running a lumberyard and not a boutique.

When you go to the lumberyard, ask for your premium needs first. Discuss availability, then price. Before you settle on price for the primo, start asking questions about your secondary needs. Nice chunky shorts of floor joist with a few knots can be made into nice, chunky frames, with no knots.

Best of luck from Texas!

Lew Barrett
07-11-2010, 10:46 PM
Glad to see you asking questions here, a good start. Do a lot of research before embarking on any major repairs. Yours is a boat that may be subjected to big stresses and long stretches in the water. This will demand some specific thinking and advice and will require the accumilated knowledge of those experienced in these sorts of repairs. On the other hand, there are some pretty great voices on the forum that have tremendous years of knowledge and experience in these sorts of projects.

The best advice I have is that you consider the sources here and take some time to learn which folks have experience in small ship repair, for this is what you have; a small ship.

I would not source structural boat wood at Home Depot for your project if I were you. Maybe for the furniture and some non-critical elements you can get by with home store stuff, but otherwise be as careful in your choices of materials as you are in selecting your advisers. Big boats are specialized business.

swampu
07-12-2010, 06:27 AM
Thanks for the great responses. I've noticed the deck which has a layer of fiberglass over it had about 3 spots that "crackle" under foot. The hull itself was c-flexed. The applicators of the c-flex said that after the process you could take the wood out of the boat and she would be just as strong. The amount of structural damage is so small it wont break the bank to use cypress when rebuilding the burnt area. They have a lumber yard in New Orleans (Riverside or River city lumber) I can't remember. I am going to read some threads now. Thanks for the direction.
Paul

J. Jumonville
07-12-2010, 12:15 PM
Paul

I have the half hull model my grandfather (Tony Jack Covacevich) made to design and build your boat. I also have some drawings of this boat that you may like to see.

If you would like to see them I could bring them to your boat and we could also take a look at the fire damage.

I took some photos of the boat about three months before the fire. That was the best she had looked since she was new.

Here is a photo taken just after the fire.

Buddy Jumonville



http://i38.photobucket.com/albums/e141/jumonv/100_6303.jpg

swampu
07-12-2010, 05:15 PM
Mr. Buddy, That would be GREAT!!! Anytime you want to call my number is 228-323-4706. The boat is currently in Eagle Point about 1 mile from Mr. Harvey's dock. If you go up Biloxi river you will see it. We've been cleaning for about 3 days, I need a good Diesel Mechanic to get everything running if you know someone. I am very exited to meet you. Thanks for the reply.
Paul