PDA

View Full Version : oil from algae likely sooner than later



sdowney717
05-14-2010, 07:35 AM
http://newenergyandfuel.com/http:/newenergyandfuel/com/2010/02/22/darpa-cracks-the-oil-out-of-algae/

personally think this will actually work compared to all the other schemes to replace crude oil. These scientists claim to have figured out how to grow a lot of oil fairly cheaply.


Late 2011 could see the first scaled production. The lead contractors are General Atomics and Science Applications International Corp. The news report is a result of successfully demonstrating a lab process of growing affordable algae triglyceride and its production into jet fuel at price point of $2.00 per gallon. There is a phase 2 in the contract whose target is $1.00 per gallon that’s getting underway.


The production rate seems small, DARPA’s numbers are in the 1,000 gallon per acre zone while others suggest 4, 5 and 6 times more oil per acre is attainable. The news though isn’t about rates per area, or the plant sizes, it’s the process cost, if the DARPA program gets to bio middle distillates at $1, it will be a shock, and the shock will be across the whole of the hydrogen carbon molecule fuel industry.

LeeG
05-14-2010, 08:01 AM
you left out a few other quotations worth noting:


In my conversation the breakthrough is described as cracking out the oil from the algae. What is still not available is the technology, be it physical, chemical, or thermal and the processing inputs to make it work. But DARPA’s representatives are certain they have the way. Their consideration remains, as all of us realize, the matters of getting to scale. Thinking so isn’t showing so. That trial is coming. Optimism is high, yet not so conclusive as the Guardian piece makes it seem. The oil extraction conundrum is the single most significant problem for mass bio oil production at scale.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

in other words they got the lipids out of the algae, the actual scaling of the process to production with energy inputs measured hasn't been done. This is just as likely to make sense for the military where end use cost of the fuel might be $40-$100/gallon when transported by air to a war zone but for part of the world where fuel is used to make things and sustain living it's a losing proposition.

David W Pratt
05-14-2010, 08:05 AM
Now, if they can get the algae to extract nutrients from sewage...

TomF
05-14-2010, 08:27 AM
If it works, grand ... particularly if the processes work on a variety of types of algae, and not just on specific strains grown for the purpose.

Imagine the benefit of being able to "harvest" the enormous algae blooms created by agricultural runoff, which generate "dead zones" in the bodies of water where the rivers empty out.

LeeG
05-14-2010, 08:30 AM
Darpa does all kinds of cool stuff. Maybe they could invent a car that gets 50mpg. Wouldn't that be amazing?

johnw
05-14-2010, 01:38 PM
Darpa does all kinds of cool stuff. Maybe they could invent a car that gets 50mpg. Wouldn't that be amazing?
Now, don't be mean just 'cause Toyota got there first. Really, agricultural runoff and sewage are unused sources of power that I can see the algae eating. Then, of course, we'll have the algae getting away and causing continuing oil spills where there's pig slop or other agricultural runoff to feed on...

Nicholas Carey
05-15-2010, 12:27 AM
Darpa does all kinds of cool stuff. Maybe they could invent a car that gets 50mpg. Wouldn't that be amazing?Honda already did that...30 years ago. So did Toyota, Isuzu, Dodge and Chrysler. I think even Chevy could boast a 50+ mpg vehicle with their unloved Chevy LUV.

Henry Ford's Model T, more than a century ago, got more than 20 miles per gallon...and it was multi-fuel. It could burm kerosene, gasoline or ethanol.

Amazing how little progress has been made in the last century.

B_B
05-15-2010, 01:18 AM
Amazing how little progress has been made in the last century.
with regard to gas mileage only - I highly doubt most folks nowadays would put up with a model T like vehicle as their daily driver - no synchro gears, no auto, no aircon, no windows, no windshield wipers, no ply tires, no brake assist, no disc brakes, no seat adjustments, no side or rearview mirrors, no seatbelts, no speed beyond ~20 mph, no turn signals, no starter - not to belabor a point too much - we have come a heck of a long way in the last 100 yrs.

PeterSibley
05-15-2010, 01:19 AM
No market for progress , just power and speed .

moTthediesel
05-15-2010, 01:23 AM
Algae stock bio-fuel holds great promise, lets hope the smart guys (and gals) can really make it work.

50 mpg? That's nothing -- we ran our bio-diesel powered Porsche 356 in last weeks "Green Grand Prix" (http://www.greengrandprix.com/) economy run in Watkins Glen NY. We completed the 80 mile loop around Seneca Lake on just 1.08 gal of 50% bio-diesel, that's just under 74 mpg. And there were other cars there that did even better --

http://i651.photobucket.com/albums/uu236/motthediesel/P5080080.jpg

Captain Intrepid
05-15-2010, 01:32 AM
A lot of that probably has to do with your speed. It's amazing how speed influences fuel consumption. A friend has a van that instantly calculates fuel consumption. The extra 10 kph between 100kph and 110 kph uses almost as much fuel as the original 100 kph! It read 10 litres per 100km at 100 kph, and 18 at 110!

seanz
05-15-2010, 02:29 AM
Algae stock bio-fuel holds great promise, lets hope the smart guys (and gals) can really make it work.

50 mpg? That's nothing -- we ran our bio-diesel powered Porsche 356 in last weeks "Green Grand Prix" (http://www.greengrandprix.com/) economy run in Watkins Glen NY. We completed the 80 mile loop around Seneca Lake on just 1.08 gal of 50% bio-diesel, that's just under 74 mpg. And there were other cars there that did even better --

http://i651.photobucket.com/albums/uu236/motthediesel/P5080080.jpg

Interesting........a diesel Porsche, how'd you manage that then?


A lot of that probably has to do with your speed. It's amazing how speed influences fuel consumption. A friend has a van that instantly calculates fuel consumption. The extra 10 kph between 100kph and 110 kph uses almost as much fuel as the original 100 kph! It read 10 litres per 100km at 100 kph, and 18 at 110!

The most significant word in that post is 'van'. ;)

PeterSibley
05-15-2010, 02:57 AM
A lot of that probably has to do with your speed. It's amazing how speed influences fuel consumption. A friend has a van that instantly calculates fuel consumption. The extra 10 kph between 100kph and 110 kph uses almost as much fuel as the original 100 kph! It read 10 litres per 100km at 100 kph, and 18 at 110!

I have a friend with Peugeot 307 tdi , it gets 50mpg (5l/100km) at 110 with 5 aboard .The thing that upset it's economy was crunching the front under spoiler .Wind resistance is all !

moTthediesel
05-15-2010, 06:51 AM
Interesting........a diesel Porsche, how'd you manage that then?


It was easy, just 3 years of equal parts - blood, sweat, tears, and midnight oil --

http://i651.photobucket.com/albums/uu236/motthediesel/2004_0101enginebay0016.jpg