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View Full Version : Natural Petroleum Seeps Release Equivalent Of Up To 80 Exxon Valdez Oil Spills



sdowney717
05-13-2010, 08:19 PM
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090513130944.htm

apparently a large amount of oil continually seeps out of the sea floor.
What is interesting to me is how much oil is under the sea.
Most of it is degraded by the environment and some turns into co2


It's the amount of residual oil that made it to the ocean floor that surprised all of the researchers. "Based on what we found in the sample cores at our sites, we calculated the amount of hydrocarbon in the whole area," Valentine said. "We have to make assumptions about how deep the sediment is, so we assume a range of between 50 centimeters and 5 meters. We come out with 8 to 80 Exxon Valdezes worth of oil, just in this area."

LeeG
05-13-2010, 09:27 PM
well then no should notice any difference with the Deepwater disaster right?

Ian McColgin
05-13-2010, 09:57 PM
We carried this already and even showed the profound chemical differences between those interesting seeps in California and this blow-out in the Gulf.

See http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?t=113700&highlight=Ian+McColgin
post #41

LeeG
05-13-2010, 10:14 PM
thanks Ian.

sdowney717
05-14-2010, 06:00 AM
http://www.livescience.com/environment/090520-natural-oil-seeps.html

natural oil seeps are a significant amount of oil, perhaps the only diff is the amount of time natural forces get to work on the oil, It still forms slicks on the sea surface and makes it to shore as tarballs. Not all oil at sea is due to man as most believe.

pictures of natural oil seeps
http://geology.com/nasa/oil-seeps/

http://geology.com/nasa/oil-seeps/gulf-of-mexico-oil-seeps.jpg

sdowney717
05-14-2010, 06:08 AM
http://nextbigfuture.com/2010/05/alfin-tracks-in-detail-engineering-work.html

in perspective the size of the current spill is small

http://alfin2100.blogspot.com/2010/05/oil-man-puts-deep-horizon-oil-spill-in.html

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_4ify7vDXrDs/S9z8t9jxBpI/AAAAAAAAFsk/ieq6DcxihqM/s640/oil_spills_by_barrels_of_oil.png

LeeG
05-14-2010, 07:09 AM
that is certainly true, there have been much larger spills. Moreover many of them going back to the early 1900's aren't listed. The 1910 Lakeview Gusher in Ca. poured out 9million barrels of oil over 18mo of which 50% was salvaged.

Back in the good ol' days I bet they didn't have to pay for the clean up. You just slip the locals a few bills and have them sign on the dotted line.

LeeG
05-14-2010, 08:04 AM
http://www.livescience.com/environment/090520-natural-oil-seeps.html
perhaps the only diff is the amount of time natural forces get to work on the oil,
pictures of natural oil seeps
http://geology.com/nasa/oil-seeps/


perhaps the only diff between a Honda Civic and a Ford 550 is the size of the tires

John Turpin
05-14-2010, 08:19 AM
Anyone who has spent any time walking on Texas beaches knows all about natural oil seepage.

LeeG
05-14-2010, 08:23 AM
and anyone who drives a lot knows accidents happen

peb
05-14-2010, 08:29 AM
Anyone who has spent any time walking on Texas beaches knows all about natural oil seepage.

I have heard it said, but I don't know if this is true. I am a little skeptical. That the amount of tar on texas beaches has actually gone down since all of the off shore drilling. The natural seeps have gone away due to the removal of the oil from the presured reserves. From my vantage point, I know that galveston seemed to have more tar on the beach 25 years ago than now. But that likely is just be due to the oil drilling technology being much cleaner now than in the 70s and 80s. But it is interesting.