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Paul Pless
05-03-2010, 02:53 PM
Anybody ever wonder why there are no oriental cheeses?

And,

Why are there never oysters on sushi menus?

Keith Wilson
05-03-2010, 02:58 PM
This is why no cheese:

Lactose intolerance by region:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/9a/LacIntol-World2.png

Paul Pless
05-03-2010, 03:01 PM
well that makes sense

Horace
05-03-2010, 03:07 PM
Oyster answer is buried in here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sushi.

A matter of taste when coupled with rice as sushi, apparently.

James McMullen
05-03-2010, 03:20 PM
Smoked oysters are good as gunkanmaki, but fresh ones are best eaten straight.

Keith Wilson
05-03-2010, 03:27 PM
Interesting that there is no data for the Netherlands.That's just the one map. It's very low, much like Scandinavia. More complete data for lactose intolerance in Europe (http://www.foodreactions.org/intolerance/lactose/prevalence.html)

OTOH, pizza is popular in Japan and Korea. Go figure.

huisjen
05-03-2010, 04:03 PM
The Funnelbeaker culture (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Funnelbeaker_culture) is believed to be the origin of the gene allowing adults of Northern European descent to digest lactose. In the area formerly inhabited by this culture, prevalence of the gene is virtually universal.[2]

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e9/Old_Europe.png

This imperfect map of European culture from 3500 BCE shows the Funnel Beaker Culture (German: Trichterrandbecherkultur) in green.

Dan

seanz
05-03-2010, 04:13 PM
Trichterrandbecherkultur


Sounds more plausible in German....otherwise I just think of The Muppets. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beaker_(Muppet))

Keith Wilson
05-03-2010, 04:19 PM
The lactase gene present in the herding peoples of Africa is somewhat different. Apparently the same trait (the ability of adults to digest cows' milk) appeared twice at least, and later spread.

PeterSibley
05-03-2010, 05:33 PM
Regarding oysters , outlawed by Leviticus weren't they ? A good carrier for cholera in effected areas .

elf
05-03-2010, 07:24 PM
There's no "and" in German. The word is "und".

They mean the same thing.

seanz
05-03-2010, 08:45 PM
1. Two food questions
2. a reference to food intolerences
3. Reply accepted
4. An answer to the second question
5. Questions the data in second post.
6. A recipe recommendation
7. Offers more comprehensive data
8. Back to the Bronze age....
9. A lame TV reference
10. Don't forget Africa
11. The Bible
12. Now it's a German spelling bee

Paul Pless
05-03-2010, 08:46 PM
> :D

paladin
05-03-2010, 09:17 PM
My Asian Children are Lactose intolerant, my middle European children are not

Noah
05-03-2010, 09:34 PM
Hey Dude, I don't believe that Oriental is the preffered nomenclature.

Keith Wilson
05-04-2010, 07:19 AM
My Asian children are lactose intolerant too; it developed in adolescence. That's why I first looked it up. Not surprising, since they've got none of my genes. They ate a more or-less ordinary American diet growing up, though, and are fond of things with milk. They go through a lot of Lactaid.

Paul Pless
05-04-2010, 07:22 AM
Hey Dude, I don't believe that Oriental is the preffered nomenclature.
what would've been more apporopriate

I, Rowboat
05-04-2010, 02:27 PM
Mongo like cheese.

Captain Blight
05-04-2010, 02:37 PM
Hey Dude, I don't believe that Oriental is the preffered nomenclature.Asiatic gentleman, please.

Captain Blight
05-04-2010, 02:37 PM
That rug really tied the room together.

Paul Pless
05-04-2010, 02:38 PM
Asiatic gentlemannot really my 'thing'

Yeadon
05-04-2010, 03:16 PM
In an extraordinarily simplistic explanation ... in American locales where there are people from Asia, they tend to be referred to as "Asian." In places where no one is Asian, you tend to see the word "Oriental," especially in the asian foods section at the grocery store.

Incidentally, everything I know, I learned at Winn-Dixie.

An aside, here in Seattle we have the International District, but all my Asian (Japanese, Korean, hapa, etc) friends call it Chinatown.

Paul Pless
05-04-2010, 03:18 PM
i should've just gone to the ask yeadon thread, what was i thinking

Yeadon
05-04-2010, 03:20 PM
Is that a question?

pefjr
05-04-2010, 03:53 PM
1. Two food questions
2. a reference to food intolerences
3. Reply accepted
4. An answer to the second question
5. Questions the data in second post.
6. A recipe recommendation
7. Offers more comprehensive data
8. Back to the Bronze age....
9. A lame TV reference
10. Don't forget Africa
11. The Bible
12. Now it's a German spelling beeDon't complain, its one of the few threads that does not have a post blaming Bush. .........so far.

Tracey
05-04-2010, 04:10 PM
Anybody ever wonder why there are no oriental cheeses?

First of all, Paul, the word is Asian
I used "Oriental" at dinner with my (college-aged) kids and they were all over me about using that word. It's Asian. But that's for another thread;)

And funny you should ask. I just pulled out the cheese book:

http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m193/searover1916/516WfREcuLL_SL500_AA300_.jpg

and apparently there are Asian cheeses, most notably from Japan. One of the better known has the funny name of "Mori No Cheese" which translated means "cheese of the forest":)

seanz
05-04-2010, 04:25 PM
1. Two food questions
2. a reference to food intolerences
3. Reply accepted
4. An answer to the second question
5. Questions the data in second post.
6. A recipe recommendation
7. Offers more comprehensive data
8. Back to the Bronze age....
9. A lame TV reference
10. Don't forget Africa
11. The Bible
12. Now it's a German spelling bee
27. Inappropriate political reference

Happy now?

Paul Pless
05-04-2010, 04:35 PM
Funny, a little research on what and why the term 'oriental' may be offensive returns this:
An important factor in the usage of 'Oriental', regardless of perceptions of pejorativeness, is that it collectively refers to cultural, ethnic and national groupings of people who do not necessarily identify themselves as associated, and hence can lead to inaccurate assumptions about similarity.Doesn't Asian do the same thing - exactly?

huisjen
05-04-2010, 04:42 PM
So is "Chinese".

Dan

John B
05-04-2010, 04:45 PM
This is a food thread right?
Asian can also refer to Indian , as in tikka masala. Not here so much but It was a surprise to us in JOE.

Donn
05-04-2010, 04:45 PM
Not all Asians are Oriental.

huisjen
05-04-2010, 04:51 PM
If we're going to talk about dairy in asian food, then this bears repeating:

Muttar Paneer

Ingredients:

* 500 gms paneer cubed
* 200 gms shelled peas
* 2 large onions
* 3 medium tomatoes
* 1 tbsp ginger paste
* 2 tbsps garlic paste
* 2 tsps coriander powder
* 1 tsp cumin powder
* 2 tsps garam masala
* 1/2 tsp turmeric powder
* 2 green chillies chopped fine
* 6 tbsps of oil
* 1 1/2 cups water
* Salt to taste
* 3 tbsps thickened/ double/ heavy cream
* Coriander leaves chopped fine to garnish

Preparation:

* Grind onions into a fine paste in a food processor. Keep aside.
* Next grind tomatoes into fine paste and keep aside.
* Heat 2-3 tbsps of oil in a pan and gently stir-fry the cubes of paneer till golden. Remove onto a paper towel and keep aside.
* In the same vessel heat 2-3 tbsps of oil and add the onion paste. Fry till it turns light brown.
* Add tomato paste, ginger and garlic paste and fry for another 2 minutes.
* Add the coriander, cumin, turmeric and garam masala powders, green chillies and fry, stirring continuously till the oil begins to separate from the masala (spice mixture).
* Add the peas to the masala and fry for 2-3 minutes.
* Then add the paneer, water and salt, reduce flame to a simmer and cook till the gravy thickens.
* When the gravy is as thick as you would like, turn off the flame and stir in the cream.
* Garnish with coriander leaves and serve.
* Mutter paneer tastes great with parathas, naans and even jeera rice.

Dan

Bob Cleek
05-04-2010, 05:12 PM
Funny, a little research on what and why the term 'oriental' may be offensive returns this:Doesn't Asian do the same thing - exactly?

Yep, it does. I hardly see anything wrong with "Oriental" as a generic term referring to folks from the Orient, generally. Are we to eschew use of the term completely? Does the "Orient Express" become the "Asian Express?" Do oriental rugs become "Asian rugs?" The folks in Bangkok haven't heard the news: they still call it the "Mandarin Oriental Hotel." http://www.mandarinoriental.com/bangkok/

Can you still use the term, "Celestials?"

seanz
05-04-2010, 05:42 PM
37. I wondered when someone would mention paneer.

John B
05-04-2010, 06:01 PM
We had a nice tom kar gai and a pad kratiem prig on the weekend. Just saying.

Mrleft8
05-04-2010, 06:03 PM
Anyone else notice that the farther away from China the restaurant is, the shinier the food gets?

Paul Pless
05-04-2010, 06:05 PM
you gotta problem with msg?

Keith Wilson
05-04-2010, 11:00 PM
Paneer's from south of the mountains, ethnically and genetically quite different. Check out the prevalence of lactose intolerance in India.

Captain Blight
05-06-2010, 08:13 PM
you gotta problem with msg?Other than the icepick headache and the explosive diarrhea, not a thing.

Lew Barrett
05-06-2010, 08:23 PM
Other than the icepick headache and the explosive diarrhea, not a thing.
Laughed out loud, and fell down rolling on the floor. Or: :D

Captain Blight
05-06-2010, 08:43 PM
I'm really just taking another crack at War And Peace whenever I show up at Imperial Dragon Buffet