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View Full Version : B Smalser et al :re mast shaping



44xt
04-28-2010, 04:06 PM
Bob, I am currently building a mast for my Garden designed double-ender and am in the process of 8 and 16 siding the tapered stick. I just read your other thread on the virtues of the Stanley #151 spokeshave and will definitely be on the lookout for one. My question is, is the spokeshave the right tool for getting the faceted stick to round? Or should I just continue “knocking corners off” with my plane until I am ready to change to the inverted sanding belt trick?

Yeadon
04-28-2010, 04:10 PM
The plane will do the job just fine.
- Bob

kc8pql
04-28-2010, 04:37 PM
Actually, a plane will probably do a better job of keeping the facets straight. It's easy to plane dips in with the short sole of a spokeshave.

Mrleft8
04-28-2010, 04:40 PM
A plane is the better tool, unless you have a lathe with an outboard spindle..... Then a longboard with 60 grit paper is a very effective tool.

ssor
04-28-2010, 05:00 PM
It is possible to achieve very round with a plane. Uniform tapers are also very posible with a plane. Just mark increments along the length and starting from the first mark on one end, plane a continous cut to the end, move up one increment and make the next cut to the end. It is wise to rotate the stick to the next facet every half dozen cuts

Wooden Boat Fittings
04-29-2010, 12:28 AM
.
And I've put on a good taper by using a quick-drying latex paint to see where I've been. Once you've rounded the spar, paint, say, the top 1/8th of it, then plane the paint off. Then paint the top quarter and plane all that off. Then 3/8th, and so on.

You can taper both ends using the same method too.

Pretty hard to go wrong if you choose the right proportions to paint, for the taper you want.... ;)

Mike

Boston
04-29-2010, 01:56 AM
I've made a lot of tapered stuff and I use my planer
its quick and accurate assuming I dont space out if I've already done a side or not
which I learned to combat by making a few marks on the thin end and cutting to them rather than just measuring out from a central mark

best of luck
B

Paul Scheuer
04-29-2010, 02:31 PM
Once you get to 16 sided, you're plenty close enough to start sanding. I'm a proponent of the "shoe-shine" method. I use old belt sander belts that started out a 30 grit but ended their powered life much lighter and much more flexible. With a fat pencil line in the center of each facet, I stop the rough sanding when the line begins to smear. I've never tried the paint layer as an indicator, but it sounds like it would give you a good view of the progress and help eliminate any expensive errors.

Tip - hold the ends of the belt perfectly vertical to get a perfect 180 degrees of rounding. Then do the other side with the piece perfectly rotated 180. I know it sounds like you'll get double the cut at the sides, but it doesn't seem to work that way.

boylesboats
04-29-2010, 04:23 PM
A plane is the better tool, unless you have a lathe with an outboard spindle..... Then a longboard with 60 grit paper is a very effective tool.

Now that it is.. but get holt of some 36 grit sanding belt and cut to make a long scrap.. while it turning at low rpm.. just work the belt like in shoeshine fashion along the length.. just be careful thou.. ya don't want it to catch and wrap itsel around the spinning mass...
what a slapper... :eek:

44xt
04-29-2010, 04:46 PM
Thank you gentlemen, for all the great tips, I was pretty sure I was going to stick with the plane as it still offers the best guidance over a constant taper. I guess I just was looking for an excuse to buy and tune-up a new tool. I enjoyed re-building the Old Stanley plane I am using that I was just looking for an oppurtunity to repeat the excercise. I'll post some photos of the process at some point. Thanks again.

kc8pql
04-29-2010, 07:00 PM
I guess I just was looking for an excuse to buy and tune-up a new tool.
Well, you could always make some cabriole legs.;)