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P.I. Stazzer-Newt
04-25-2010, 02:29 AM
This is an interesting new word in written english - a three letter word with a really complicated meaning.

What did you use before?

Paul Fitzgerald
04-25-2010, 02:54 AM
This is an interesting new word in written english - a three letter word with a really complicated meaning.

What did you use before?

Whatever!

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
04-25-2010, 03:12 AM
really? you're asking what "meh" means?

Nope - I is quite comfortable with the meaning - I just don't have an exact English equivalent.


Mahlish or mahleesh - seems to fit.

shamus
04-25-2010, 03:53 AM
I first encountered it in another thread five minutes ago. Could someone enlighten me? From the context it seemed like "duh", or "you are kidding,right?", but I dare say I'm missing some subtlety.:confused:

Ron Williamson
04-25-2010, 05:39 AM
I don't know,that doesn't really do anything for me.
I'm apathetic and indifferent and too lazy to write it out.

Generally accompanied by a shrug,raised eyebrows and a curled upper lip.
Howzat?
R

Ian McColgin
04-25-2010, 06:31 AM
A Forum interrogative like this, posted without context or attempt at defininition, passes before my consciousness with no more response than a shrug of utter indifference.

Paul Pless
04-25-2010, 06:36 AM
What did you use before?fart worked

Peerie Maa
04-25-2010, 06:38 AM
"fart"? Meh!

The Bigfella
04-25-2010, 06:49 AM
Que?

Bruce Taylor
04-25-2010, 07:53 AM
"fart"? Meh!

Can "meh" be used with an exclamation point? I say no.

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
04-25-2010, 08:07 AM
Can "meh" be used with an exclamation point? I say no.

Agreed.

I think that the word in its current usage something of the "Sub-Optimal - but neither I nor anyone else is going to fix it"...


Eh no but?

Jim Ledger
04-25-2010, 08:33 AM
Can "meh" be used with an exclamation point? I say no.

A slight shrug of the shoulders, palms forward, without much emphasis, accompanied by a couldn't-care-less look off to one side.


Jon Stewart has it down.

C. Ross
04-25-2010, 08:38 AM
Can "meh" be used with an exclamation point? I say no.

"Meh" is an anti-exclamation point. That is its entire meaning.

katey
04-25-2010, 09:49 AM
"Oh well."

purri
04-25-2010, 07:04 PM
Yiddische cant.

OconeePirate
04-25-2010, 08:19 PM
I like pie.

gibetheridge
04-25-2010, 09:30 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meh

LeeG
04-25-2010, 09:59 PM
This is an interesting new word in written english - a three letter word with a really complicated meaning.

What did you use before?

I've never used the word. From the context I've seen it used it's a condescending dismissal of anothers opinion or statement.

Hughman
04-25-2010, 10:42 PM
Feh.

The549
04-26-2010, 12:42 AM
Meh represents and evolved from the increasingly connected style and pace of life in which we live, coming to represent and be able to bluntly and inelegantly but capably describe and work for different things; acknowledge, poke or prod, or just as a reminder that "hey, I'm here and you were just gonna say something when we left off", ie you call someone and don't really care or have the need to fully reiterate what you need to talk to each other about ("we're on the phone start talking now"). It's also used to represent a feeling and description of a mistake or unpredicted/hoped for event - something that's not quite embarrassing, but also ultimately irrelevant....and finally, it's used as....confusion? what?

edit to add: also apathy and disinterest. especially of something related to style, admitted or not.

Lew Barrett
04-26-2010, 11:32 AM
I take it to mean "mediocre."
Now that it is has been brought to our attention, we can await it's inevitable and massive overuse by English language destroyers everywhere. As a modifier, iperhaps it will become the new "most overused word in the English language." Maybe we'll get lucky and it won't have that degree of legs and spared the future platitude of a new word for mediocre.

Captain Blight
04-26-2010, 11:37 AM
I've never used the word. From the context I've seen it used it's a condescending dismissal of anothers opinion or statement.
*almost.* It's from The Simpsons, and Lisa says it a lot; it signifies an almost, but definitely not-quite-complete, lack of interest in the subject at hand; or to indicate that the speaker has no particularly strong feelings one way or anther, though not necessarily incuding equivocation in this.

Paul Pless
04-26-2010, 11:42 AM
Maybe we'll get lucky and it won't have that degree of legs and spared the future platitude of a new word for mediocre.We can only hope.
I take it to mean "mediocre."It will be hard for me from here on to not think that people that use the word are quite "mediocre" themselves.

Captain Blight
04-26-2010, 12:17 PM
It will be hard for me from here on to not think that people that use the word are quite "mediocre" themselves.
Meh.