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David G
04-17-2010, 01:56 AM
http://www.popcrunch.com/the-16-best-dystopian-books-of-all-time/

Captain Intrepid
04-17-2010, 03:54 AM
I would argue for Fahrenheit 451 to rate even higher. The other books are good too, but I haven't yet found a writer who writes prose even half as beautifully as Ray Bradbury. His use of language is to me halfway between prose and poetry, and unreservedly flowing and readable.

willmarsh3
04-17-2010, 04:16 AM
I'd add Margaret Atwood's Oryx and Crake to this list. It's about corporate greed and technology run amok in a divided society.

seanz
04-17-2010, 05:12 AM
I've only read about half of that list....that's a good thing, right?

When I was scrolling through it I started to think he must have left Neal Stephenson off and I was wondering why........

James McMullen
04-17-2010, 09:26 AM
The Last Stand of the DNA Cowboys (http://www.amazon.com/Last-Stand-Cowboys-Mick-Farren/dp/0345358082) by Mick Farren. Delightfully disturbing.

Keith Wilson
04-17-2010, 09:56 AM
I wouldn't say A Canticle For Leibowitz belongs on the list at all. It's an absolutley wonderful book, but not really dystopian.

Chip-skiff
04-17-2010, 09:30 PM
Right-o. I think dystopian and post-apocalyptic are distinct genres.

Dystopian is early- to mid-collapse.

A Canticle for Liebowitz is great. But my favorite post-apocalyptic novel is Riddley Walker by Russell Hoban.

willmarsh3
04-18-2010, 07:28 AM
There's a couple of books I've read where a dystopia is prominently featured but no apocalypse.

Winter Flight - Joseph Bayly - a cautionary tale for today.

Mysterium - Robert Charles Wilson - http://www.amazon.com/Mysterium-Robert-Charles-Wilson/dp/0553569538

Keith Wilson
04-18-2010, 08:58 AM
I think dystopian and post-apocalyptic are distinct genres. Right; quite distinct Dystopian is a world you sure as hell wouldn't want to live in; 1984 is the classic example. Post-apocalyptic books can be rather sunny, although many aren't. On of the best of that genre is Ursula K. LeGuin's Always Coming Home, quite an extraordinary book, if odd.

htom
04-18-2010, 09:34 AM
I think of "dystopian" as anti-utopian, rather than post-apocalyptic. A work could be both, of course. Fahrenheit 451 an example of the first, A Canticle for Leibowitz the second, and Jonathan Lethem's Amnesia Moon is both.