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Paul Pless
04-12-2010, 12:43 PM
Does anybody besides me really dislike them?

I hate them and never carry or use them even though I have a couple of what are regarded as nice ones.

Ian McColgin
04-12-2010, 12:50 PM
Disagree. The Leatherman is incredible and any pocket knife like mine is also a multitool.

The Sikhs carry a knife as a symbol of always being ready to protect the weak. To that I add my Dad's motto that a gentleman should be able to clip a cigar and open a wine bottle at any time in any place.

huisjen
04-12-2010, 12:51 PM
Which ones do you have and hate?

I like a PSTII, but I break the tips off the pliers every couple years. Eventually, Leatherman will stop replacing them.

I was unimpressed with my Juice CS4. The Kick is okay, but I miss the diamond file of the PSTII when I carry a Kick. Mostly I use the pliers, wire cutters, phillips driver, and occasionally the flat screwdriver, scissors, and jewelers screwdriver (for cleaning dirt out from under my nails). The knife blade is the part I use least.

Dan

Paul Pless
04-12-2010, 12:52 PM
To that I add my Dad's motto that a gentleman should be able to clip a cigar and open a wine bottle at any time in any place.With or without dedicated tools, I've never not been able to get a cigar lit properly, nor have I ever gone thirsty. :p

Paul Pless
04-12-2010, 12:57 PM
Which ones do you have and hate?I have the original leatherman and a fairly expensive gerber (not sure which one). You know what - it ain't much trouble for me to carry a decent set of short needle nose pliers with me if i'm camping or boating; and if there's anything that pisses me off its stripping out a screw for lack of a proper screw driver. I'd never imagine myself using those lame ass saws or files on a multi tool. I guess maybe I'm either close enough to my home office or shop to not need to carry a multitool or if I'm out in the boat or on some hunting land more than likely I have some real tools with me.

Lewisboats
04-12-2010, 01:01 PM
I have the Leatherman (the bigger one...within the last couple of years...Wave I think) and use it practically every day.

huisjen
04-12-2010, 01:02 PM
I don't have a saw on mine. I've been tempted by the gardener's version though, which has a small bypass pruner in place of pliers. And a good small diamond file is nice to have, even if the glorified nail files on many multitools is worthless.

Also, I typically carry a 6" adjustable wrench, a folding utility (replaceable blade) knife, and a 12' tape measure in my pocket. Non-folding needle nose pliers would just be dangerous though.

Dan

TomF
04-12-2010, 01:10 PM
I've always been put off by the price of the good ones, and the nagging doubt that the tools would end up being "all that," compared with what I'd have otherwise. Maybe the good ones are really good ... but it's maddening to work with mediocre tools at any point.

I carry a small-ish swiss army knife, and if I'm going somewhere out of the ordinary will usually add a few real tools in the car or in a pack. If camping, I'll almost always also carry a fixed blade knife.

Ian McColgin
04-12-2010, 01:23 PM
In reference to post #4; Paul, perhaps that's why you're in hell.

HehHehHeh

Paul Pless
04-12-2010, 01:25 PM
> :D

Iceboy
04-12-2010, 01:26 PM
I prefer discreet components. Why have a multitool that does most jobs half-assed just for the convenience of having a lot of bad tools in one package?

OconeePirate
04-12-2010, 01:35 PM
I have a Leatherman that someone gave me as a gift around 15 years ago. I've never had much use for it. I hate the screwdrivers, I quickly bent the pliers to a state that they bind, and someone broke the tip of the knife. They live in the top drawer of my toolbox. The pliers occasionally get used as does the screwdriver when I'm too lazy to look for the right tool. The file gets used more than anything.

Concordia...41
04-12-2010, 01:36 PM
I think it's a case of YMMV - depending on your needs and which multitool.

When it's right ... it's sweet. A good tool with just the right features is sweet. A cheap tool or even a high-end one that has more (or less) on it than you need is equally bad.

I tossed two cheapies in the trash yesterday when I was cleaning out some stuff. One was a promotional item I'd gotten somewhere, the other was just junk. Both I'd held on to with the thought that they'd be good for the grandsons, but #1 grandson - now 14 is doing real well in Boy Scouts and has already outgrown the "cheap junk" phase. Grandma makes sure he gets a Gander Mountain card for birthdays and Christmas so he can pick out what he really wants.

#2 grandson probably doesn't need a knife... :eek: :(

I was a Leatherman Sideclip fan until they went out of production. The Sideclip was just "right" for me. Knife, phillips and flat screwdrivers, pliers. Nothing more. Nothing less.

After dropping more than a couple overboard at various time, I've now switched to the Skeletool. It's the same - yet different.

Paul Pless
04-12-2010, 01:37 PM
I prefer discreet components. Why have a multitool that does most jobs half-assed just for the convenience of having a lot of bad tools in one package?exactly!

Bruce Taylor
04-12-2010, 01:41 PM
I have one in my camping kit. I use it mainly for lifting pots out of the fire. :D

Ian McColgin
04-12-2010, 01:47 PM
Iceboy and Paul are correct that for major jobs where you carry a tool kit along anyway, the right tool is the right tool. All multi-s have limits. But they really fill the gap between where fingers and teeth suffice and where you have a tool kit along.

It's interesting how somepeople "never use" it while others like me "couldn't get through the day without it."

TomF
04-12-2010, 01:51 PM
I have my teeth and my fingers, the original multitool,I have most of them. ;)

Brian Palmer
04-12-2010, 02:34 PM
I love mine (Leatherman made in USA) and use it a bunch out in the woods camping or fishing.

Most recently I used the pliers (not the best tool, but the best I had) to tighten the axle nuts on a kid's bike, when we were about 2 miles down a rail-trail from the car.

We regularly use the pliers to pull ticks (yuck) off the cats.

Brian

John of Phoenix
04-12-2010, 02:35 PM
I get a lot of use out of this little gizmo for light duty jobs.
Even has a built-in flashlight.

http://www.swissarmy.com/images/ProductCatalog/vm/vm_53321_sol_a02.jpg
Letter opener (blade)
Scissors
Straight pin
Pressurized ball point pen
Tweezers
Magnifying glass
Screwdriver 3mm
Screwdriver 5mm
Phillips screwdriver #00-0
Phillips screwdriver #1-2
LED mini light
Ruler (in & cm)

(And yes the TSA considers both the blade and scissors lethal weapons.)

Bruce Hooke
04-12-2010, 02:44 PM
I prefer discreet components. Why have a multitool that does most jobs half-assed just for the convenience of having a lot of bad tools in one package?

If you are carrying everything on your back (e.g., backpacking) or trying to fit all your gear into a sea kayak then you would, I suspect, very much see the benefits of not trying to carry a bunch of separate tools.

Certainly, if I am in my workshop I am not going to reach for a multi-tool. If I am miles from any road (or large boat), a multi-tool is far more effective than anything else of similar size and weight that I have come across.

As I think about it, you don't have to be that far from a workshop for a multi-tool to make sense. You just have to be walking and carrying everything rather than using some sort of vehicle. Of course if you are heading 500 feet into the woods to do some work you'll bring the right tools, but if you are out for a walk and not necessarily planning to have to fix something then a multi-tool can be quite useful and saves you an almost 1/4 mile round trip walk to the shop to get the "proper" tool.

leikec
04-12-2010, 03:05 PM
I have this neat little multitool called a screwdriver. It has been used as a chisel, pry bar, ice pick, hammer (reverse and strike nail with handle), scribe, pin punch...and occasionally as a device to tighten or loosen a screw.

Jeff C

Concordia...41
04-12-2010, 03:22 PM
If you are carrying everything on your back (e.g., backpacking) or trying to fit all your gear into a sea kayak then you would, I suspect, very much see the benefits of not trying to carry a bunch of separate tools.

Certainly, if I am in my workshop I am not going to reach for a multi-tool. If I am miles from any road (or large boat), a multi-tool is far more effective than anything else of similar size and weight that I have come across.

As I think about it, you don't have to be that far from a workshop for a multi-tool to make sense. You just have to be walking and carrying everything rather than using some sort of vehicle. Of course if you are heading 500 feet into the woods to do some work you'll bring the right tools, but if you are out for a walk and not necessarily planning to have to fix something then a multi-tool can be quite useful and saves you an almost 1/4 mile round trip walk to the shop to get the "proper" tool.

Heck, I can be in the house or backyard and reach for the Leatherman to save walking to the garage. Same for being on my hands and knees on the foredeck vs standing up and going below.

ccmanuals
04-12-2010, 03:30 PM
http://www.aceros-de-hispania.com/image/knife-penknives-sog/multiTool-paraTool-sog.jpgAlways keep a SOG in the truck. It's come in handy many times.

David G
04-12-2010, 03:40 PM
That looks like the same SOG that I have. It comes with me in the belt pouch whenever I'm camping, fishing, or boating. Otherwise, it lives in the side compartment of the drivers door. I have been glad of its presence, and of its competence, many times. It's no lightweight, but it's well engineered, and very well built.

John of Phoenix
04-12-2010, 03:43 PM
I left a Swiss Army knife in a condo on a family vacation. Nothing fancy - a couple of blades, screwdivers, corkscrew and nail file. My SiL, thoughtful lady that she is, got a replacement. The damned thing has 40 tools including a laser pointer and hoof cleaner. At 2 1/2 pounds I figure it cost her about $85/pound.

Paul Fitzgerald
04-12-2010, 03:51 PM
The original leatherman, with a lanyard, is really useful when I am sailing.

seanz
04-12-2010, 04:22 PM
Does anybody besides me really dislike them?

I hate them and never carry or use them even though I have a couple of what are regarded as nice ones.

Multitools are the 4X4 of the pocketknife world........

Nicholas Scheuer
04-12-2010, 04:27 PM
A Suisse company I once worked for used Victorynox Suisse Army knives as favors. All employees were given one that included a saw, which could be suprisingly handy.

A German employee I worked with once admitted to having uemployed his Campany Knife to saw almost all of the way through a wooden table leg in a restrauant that had been guilty of bad service.

My Son gave me a niice Leatherman some years back, which I keep in my truck. However, most of the time I use discreet tools for whatever, as I carry a lot of them in the truck, too.

Moby Nick

leikec
04-12-2010, 04:27 PM
More like the Ronco Veg-O-Matic of the tool world....

Jeff C

Garret
04-12-2010, 04:35 PM
I have this neat little multitool called a screwdriver. It has been used as a chisel, pry bar, ice pick, hammer (reverse and strike nail with handle), scribe, pin punch...and occasionally as a device to tighten or loosen a screw.

Jeff C


Sheesh - ya forgot its most important job - bottle opener! :D

'course if there's a seat belt or lighter handy, ya don't need it.

Bill R
04-12-2010, 04:37 PM
Can't live without my Leatherman Wave. My boss always laughs at how many uses I find for it.

sailboy3
04-12-2010, 04:43 PM
For a knife, I'd rather just have something with one or two blades and nothing else. I also carry a small pair of vice-grips around, and would rather carry the tools separately rather than in one big useless clump. Once I'm old enough to need one, I'm sure I'll appreciate a good corkscrew too.

Garret
04-12-2010, 04:58 PM
I have this neat little multitool called a screwdriver. It has been used as a chisel, pry bar, ice pick, hammer (reverse and strike nail with handle), scribe, pin punch...and occasionally as a device to tighten or loosen a screw.

Jeff C


Sheesh - ya forgot its most important job - bottle opener! :D

'course if there's a seat belt or lighter handy, ya don't need it.

leikec
04-12-2010, 05:38 PM
I gave you a rimshot on the first post...don't get greedy....

:)

Jeff C

Brian Palmer
04-12-2010, 06:28 PM
I knew a fellow who, while in the Peace Corps, tried to save a man's life by using his Leatherman to dismantle a car seat after an automobile crash to get him out. He got him out, but unfortunately it was too late.

Brian

Ron Williamson
04-12-2010, 06:38 PM
I like the small needle nose vise-grips(with real wire cutters) and a Pic-Quic screwdriver.
How do you properly tighten a bolt and nut with a onesy screwdriver/pliers?
R

Bruce Hooke
04-12-2010, 07:10 PM
I like the small needle nose vise-grips(with real wire cutters) and a Pic-Quic screwdriver.
How do you properly tighten a bolt and nut with a onesy screwdriver/pliers?
R

There is usually something around that you can stick in the screw slot to keep it from turning enough to allow you to tighten the nut. Of course if the screw is corroded and needs a lot of force to turn then you will need a proper screwdriver and a wrench, not pliers, but REMEMBER, we are not talking about what tools are ideal for the job, we are talking about what are the minimum tools you can carry to get the essential jobs done. If what you are doing makes it reasonable to lug around a bunch of tools then of course you are going to have a better selection of tools on hand, and no single tool will ever be able to do what you can do with a bunch of tools.

If you are the type of person who heads into the woods in a 4x4 to do work then a Leatherman may well not make much sense since you can easily bring a toolbox full of tools. If you are the type of person who heads into the woods for a 2-week canoeing trip then a Leatherman is likely to make more sense, especially if there are many portages. For a 2-week backpacking trip a Leatherman may well be too heavy. It is all about balancing the work of lugging the weight around against the benefits of having the tool(s) on hand.

Peter Malcolm Jardine
04-12-2010, 07:17 PM
I have a SOG, and it has done yeoman service for me, although I don't carry it with me as often as I used to... I find that however many tools I have with me, which might be a truckful, I need the one I left at the shop... or worse, I need a different size of whatever it is I have.

Sam F
04-12-2010, 07:43 PM
I've always been put off by the price of the good ones, and the nagging doubt that the tools would end up being "all that," compared with what I'd have otherwise. Maybe the good ones are really good ... but it's maddening to work with mediocre tools at any point.

That's what I thought too Tom. Realistically a multi-tool can't possibly be better than a purpose-built tool. But then if you haven't got it, it's not worth anything.

And then I found my SOG. Made in the USA too. I have no idea what they cost. Mine had been run over multiple times in the gravel parking lot. The leather case looked a bit rough, but the tool looks and works just fine. Nowadays, it's part of my EDC. I never ever go anywhere without it.

And then I found the Schrade multi-tool lying in road the across from my mailbox. It'd been run over multiple times too. Looks and works just fine. It's part of my son's EDC now.
They're both awesome tools.

htom
04-12-2010, 08:22 PM
SOG Paratool lives in my pack/briefcase. There are other good ones, some of which I have, but that bendable pliers is just so handy I think I'd carry it just for that.

Ron Williamson
04-12-2010, 08:26 PM
My wee vise grips are smaller than most multi-tools.

I have one of these in the door pocket in my truck.
http://www.drillspot.com/products/408784/General_Tools_86014_Saw_Screwdriver_Set

R

Captain Intrepid
04-12-2010, 08:36 PM
A sheath knife and an 8 inch marlinespike are my multitools. Anything that I can't do with them I use discrete tools.

paladin
04-12-2010, 08:39 PM
All the screws on my riflescopes operate with the edge of a dog tag, the Randal opens cans, cuts stuff, the wire saw in conjucntion with the toggles on my jacket cut small stuff pretty darn fast...

Phillip Allen
04-12-2010, 08:40 PM
I've carried a pocket knife all my life...never needed those multi tools and they tend to be poorly constructed as well

pipefitter
04-12-2010, 08:41 PM
I dislike the multi tools as well and it just seems like a girl thing. I never could get accustomed to the Swiss army knives either. The thing is, I enjoy using dedicated quality tools. I also don't like folding hex/torx key sets or gimmick tools like the gear wrench.

I have tried to like them. It just has never been practical in an industrial environment.

I never use that complimentary Craftsman key chain screw driver either.

Michael D. Storey
04-12-2010, 09:35 PM
The only multitool that i really like is a hammer

oznabrag
04-12-2010, 10:01 PM
I dislike the multi tools as well and it just seems like a girl thing. I never could get accustomed to the Swiss army knives either. The thing is, I enjoy using dedicated quality tools. I also don't like folding hex/torx key sets or gimmick tools like the gear wrench.

I have tried to like them. It just has never been practical in an industrial environment.

I never use that complimentary Craftsman key chain screw driver either.

I carry a small Swiss Army Knife and a 3" Kershaw clip-on.

I never use the blade on the SAK, but the other tools are handy.

I never wanted a multi-tool because they're just too bulky. The SAK is small and light and versatile enough to justify it's presence in my pocket. Besides, it only cost me two bucks!

coelacanth2
04-12-2010, 10:44 PM
I've got a bunch of them, the oldest being an original Leatherman and a Gerber. I like the tools on the Leatherman, having found the files/hacksaw useful on a number of occasions. The pliers are quite nice, but the design leaves a lot of thin edges to deal with when gripping tightly. The Gerber is much better in that regard, but feels clunkier. I've got some smaller cheepies, too. One my son gave me is from Cabela's - not the best, the blades and tools don't lock well enough but it has a small, bright light which has come in useful. My family gave me the gardening Leatherman last year, and a fishing version this year, both rather useful. Vise-Grip made one for a while with basic blade, small tools and a socket for interchangable bits, all packed into the handle of an 8" or so Vise-Grip pliers. ugly and clunky, but very useful. Mine has since vanished:rolleyes:. In the yard or camping I usually carry both a folding blade knife for knife tasks and a multitool for all the rest.

Bruce Hooke
04-12-2010, 11:02 PM
My wee vise grips are smaller than most multi-tools.

But presumably lack a knife and any screwdrivers, which are an important parts of a usual multi-tool.

Bruce Hooke
04-12-2010, 11:04 PM
those multi tools and they tend to be poorly constructed as well

The cheap ones are most definitely poorly constructed. The good ones are anything but poorly constructed in my experience.

Bruce Hooke
04-12-2010, 11:05 PM
I have tried to like them. It just has never been practical in an industrial environment.

I'd agree. That is not the type of environment they are designed for...

Ron Williamson
04-13-2010, 05:53 AM
Bruce
You allowed in a prior post,that you don't really need a screwdriver(Two slot and one tiny Phillips screwdriver? they're pretty silly) and I've already got a real knife clipped to my lifejacket or in a pocket.
That leaves a can opener(who brings cans where weight is a concern?),bottle opener(same,besides I can open a bottle with almost anything),file(for what? There are rocks everywhere),saw(3"? I'd rather do without, since I folded mine onto my finger after it jammed in the kerf in about 1980.
R

TomF
04-13-2010, 07:14 AM
...saw(3"? I'd rather do without, since I folded mine onto my finger after it jammed in the kerf in about 1980. ...Yeowch!

cs
04-13-2010, 12:15 PM
A year ago I had no multi-tools and like Paul (and apparently many others) had no use for them nor saw the need.

I now have 3 of them and I understand.

One is the Army issue cheap Gerber, and not really that good.

http://www.traditioncreek.com/storefront/images/products_supplies/Gerber_Multi_Tool.jpg

The other two are fantastic. One of them is the Leatherman Wave (Thanks Brian).

http://www.taw.eu.com/images/Leatherman-Wave-LG.jpg

And the other is the Gerber Flick (thanks Lil Sis) and it also is a great tool.

http://www.shop4gerber.co.uk/gerber_flik_tool.jpg

I always carry one with me. A multi-tool has many uses and it really does come in handy. Anything from cutting open boxes, to cutting banding straps, to turning hard to turn thumbscrews, to emergency screwdriver and even cutting loose threads off of your uniform. Hell I've even used it to trim my mustache.

So if you ever need a quick tool and don't need to carry all that extra baggage, I highly recommended one of the latter two I mentioned.

Chad

Bruce Hooke
04-13-2010, 12:45 PM
Bruce
You allowed in a prior post,that you don't really need a screwdriver(Two slot and one tiny Phillips screwdriver? they're pretty silly) and I've already got a real knife clipped to my lifejacket or in a pocket.
That leaves a can opener(who brings cans where weight is a concern?),bottle opener(same,besides I can open a bottle with almost anything),file(for what? There are rocks everywhere),saw(3"? I'd rather do without, since I folded mine onto my finger after it jammed in the kerf in about 1980.
R

I did not mean to suggest that a screwdriver was not necessary, what I was suggesting was that in cases where you are trying to hold a screw while you tighten a nut, the relatively low force often required to hold the screw can often make improvised solutions viable. When it is a screw alone that needs to be tightened or loosened an improvised screwdriver is much less effective.

Realistically, the two tools I use most on Leatherman are the pliers and the knife but the screwdrivers are a close third and I really like the two sizes of flat head screwdriver since a really small screwdriver tip will often just chew up the head of a big screw and a big flat screwdriver will often not fit a small screw.

The can opener is nice for cases where weight is not a huge issue (such as on a canoe trip without lots of portages) but where weight and space are enough of an issue that you are not going to bring a whole toolkit, or a whole lot of dedicated kitchen tools.