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Clinton B Chase
04-10-2010, 09:37 PM
I am looking for some feedback about this tool:

http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p=44834&cat=1,50230

Low Angle spokeshave.

I use a spokeshave a lot for oarmaking work. The other choice is a shave from LN. Perhaps both.

How does this low angle shave work in practice?

JimConlin
04-10-2010, 09:58 PM
I have a couple of Record spokeshaves. They are not refined tools that are a joy to use, but they do the job. The small L-N shave is worthwhile, too.

Bob Smalser
04-10-2010, 10:03 PM
Haven't used that one, but had an original low-angle wooden shave for decades.

At 65 bucks, you are wasting money. A used Stanley #151 or #51 can be adjusted to take just as fine a cut, and can be had for 15 bucks or less on eBay.

For that money you can buy two of them so one can be set coarse and the other fine, saving a lot of fussing. There's an article on my web page below on tuning one up for fine work.

http://pic20.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/4518261/385527669.jpg

pcford
04-10-2010, 10:15 PM
from sawdustandshavings.com:

At around $30 the modern Stanley 151 seems like a great deal. The Stanley name has meant good quality tools for over a century. In truth, that reputation ended for many of us in the last century. The quality of the manufacturing may be just fine but what Stanley is asking the factories to manufacture is a far cry from what it used to be. I don't own an old 151, but Stanley didn't develop a good reputation creating tools like this.
I received this spokeshave as a gift for Christmas last year. I had really wanted one for some time so I was very happy to receive the gift. Once in the shop my excitement was tempered a bit. I have two main gripes.
The first problem is that the area the blade rests on isn't flat. Before you tighten the thumb screw the blade just wobbles back and forth. Being somewhat surprised, I went to my local store that carried these and the salesperson confirmed that was normal. I should have expected this answer since the surface wasn't machined, but just cast and painted. Maybe that is how Stanley has always made them. If I get an older one I'll just have to check. With this new knowledge I decided to make the best of it. After using a mill file on my brand new tool for some time I was able to get the surface somewhat flat. At least the blade didn't wobble around anymore. Mission accomplished!
http://www.sawdustandshavings.com/images/hand_tools/stanley_spokeshave_mouth.jpgIt wasn't until using the spokeshave that I noticed the next design issue. The mouth of the tool is just huge. Unless you are taking greater than 1/8" chunks on your passes with this tool, the mouth is just too big. There are much better spokeshaves out there, even some made by Stanley. I personally think the Stanley 53, with the adjustable mouth, is a big improvment over the 151. By the way, if you like the idea of hogging off tons of wood, I recommend a scrub plane, draw knife or a belt sander with 60 grit. Getting back to the spokeshave, the gaping mouth on this tool really doesn't lend itself well to working with anything but straight grain and without the wood supported by the body of the spokeshave, chip out can be a problem.
All is not lost. Once I get enough money for a truly nice spokeshave I intend to use this one to experiment with different cutter shapes.
Overall Rating 2 out of 6.

Gold Rock
04-10-2010, 10:38 PM
I have all three of these LV shaves http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p=49142&cat=1,50230&ap=1

Their performance is top shelf, and their build quality is startlingly good, but what really sets them apart for me is the blade adjustment. The two screw adjustment mechanism makes setting the blade fast and easy. Really top shelf, I think. Their cost is more than compensated by the above, but the suggested ability of the unit you're inquiring about to satisfactorily accomodate concave as well as flat/convex surfaces would make it an appealing buy if it performs as advertised. My personal two bits on LV is that they are of unfailing high quality, so I'd bet it's a good unit.

Tom M.
04-10-2010, 10:47 PM
I have a Record convex spokeshave and I can't fettle it worth a darn. I almost never use it. I would really like a spokeshave that works. Gonna look at Bob's article I guess.

Edited to say: That's exactly what I did, Bob, except the casting is the cap iron is so rough I'll probably have to take it to a machinist to get it right. In comparison, $65 doesn't look too bad for one that works.

Bob Smalser
04-10-2010, 11:00 PM
....convex...

Sell it and buy a flat-bottom shave. Like compass planes, convex sole shaves only work well on workpieces having the exact radius of the sole....and a regular shave has a short enough sole to shave inside curves of variable radii nicely.

Older is better buying Stanley tools. That means black japanning on the iron parts rather than blue paint....and if you can find one with Sweetheart markings from the 1920's, be willing to pay extra for it as that was Stanley's best era.

Tom M.
04-10-2010, 11:07 PM
Ya, I have a nice Sweetheart block plane. I think I will sell that Record. Its useless. Pretty though.

Tom Lathrop
04-10-2010, 11:09 PM
The Stanley 151 is still the benchmark tool. You can spend a lot more money for the fancy or different types but you won't get a better tool. For round or spindle work, set the blade at a slight side to side angle and you can make either heavy or light cuts with the same tool without readjusting. Convex spokeshaves are a useless nuisance and the flat ones do most everything well in good hands.

Tom M.
04-10-2010, 11:15 PM
I can understand why a flat sole will work easier, but my convex shave sucks especially because of the cap iron/chipbreaker machining. 3/4 of the shavings try to jamb in between the iron and the breaker. Don't get a Record.

Bob Smalser
04-10-2010, 11:21 PM
Its useless. Pretty though.

Whether a plane or a shave, it needs to index perfectly on the workpiece both in front of and behind the mouth, both areas firmly holding the wood fibers down so the blade can cut them. Otherwise it's like trying to cut a thin ribbon not stretched taut using tin snips.


http://pic20.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/17020258/263582393.jpg

And for the best results, "flat" means using index dye and a trued surface like an indexing plate or machine table. Not eyeballing with a straightedge.

http://pic20.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/17020258/263438241.jpg

PeterSibley
04-10-2010, 11:23 PM
The Stanley 151 is still the benchmark tool. You can spend a lot more money for the fancy or different types but you won't get a better tool. For round or spindle work, set the blade at a slight side to side angle and you can make either heavy or light cuts with the same tool without readjusting. Convex spokeshaves are a useless nuisance and the flat ones do most everything well in good hands.

Seconded , I can't fault mine .

DerekW
04-11-2010, 01:20 AM
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p=44834&cat=1,50230Low Angle spokeshave...
How does this low angle shave work in practice?

It works like an old-school wooden shave, but with better blade adjustment. I have one and like it. As they point out, the blade forms the sole of the shave. The reversible nose piece is simple and adjustable.

Larks
04-11-2010, 03:32 AM
I am looking for some feedback about this tool:

http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p=44834&cat=1,50230

Low Angle spokeshave.



I bought this same one for making half hulls while I was away from my boat for a while, although I can't really compare it, (having only used a convex Stanley one from the local hardware that wasn't much use to me), I loved it. Found it very pleasant to use and control and a nice tool to have in the tool box now.

goodbasil
04-11-2010, 06:21 AM
I have one of those LV all metal low-angle ss's. It was the first of the LV spokeshaves, also the first one they made. I immediately wished that it had wood handles, my wish came true because they brought out these two kits.
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p=49710&cat=1,50230&ap=1

It's a great tool mythinks. If you don't mind metal handles and shell'in out $65--, I say go for it.

Garth Jones
04-11-2010, 08:12 AM
Hey Clint,

I've had one for a couple of years now and I really like it. Harry Bryan reviewed it a few years ago in WB and also liked it.

Cheers,
Garth

Clinton B Chase
04-11-2010, 10:03 PM
Thanks all. My Stanley clogs easily and I find I need to have my awl with me all the time to clean it out. I have opened the mouth with a file a couple times. It seems that as the blade wears I need to open the mouth more.

I also will check the sole flatness. I've lapped it before but it may be worn again.

I like the winged handles on Stanley to keep hands clear of work. Just need to solve the clogging issue.

Whidbey_One
04-11-2010, 11:30 PM
Thanks all. My Stanley clogs easily and I find I need to have my awl with me all the time to clean it out. I have opened the mouth with a file a couple times. It seems that as the blade wears I need to open the mouth more.

I also will check the sole flatness. I've lapped it before but it may be worn again.

I like the winged handles on Stanley to keep hands clear of work. Just need to solve the clogging issue.

You may be taking to aggressive a cut. Try backing the blade off until you are taking only the thinnest possible shave and see if the problem persists.

David Cockey
04-12-2010, 05:05 AM
Thanks all. My Stanley clogs easily and I find I need to have my awl with me all the time to clean it out. I have opened the mouth with a file a couple times. It seems that as the blade wears I need to open the mouth more.

I also will check the sole flatness. I've lapped it before but it may be worn again.

I like the winged handles on Stanley to keep hands clear of work. Just need to solve the clogging issue.

Does the clog start when a chip gets caught between the blade and cap? Or because the edge of the cap is too blunt?

Hone the edge of the cap so its straight without any lumps or gaps. Also check that the top surface of the blade is fit, and hone if needed. Then the cap should fit tight against the blade. And if the edge of the cap is blunt round it with a file so chips will slide past it.

David Cockey
04-12-2010, 05:09 AM
Convex spokeshaves are usable with practice, but are not self-indexing like a flat spokeshave. One of the keys to using a convex spokeshave is a light cut.

goodbasil
04-12-2010, 05:59 AM
If its clogging your cutter is too proud and your cut too aggressive. Common problem with the Stanley/Record spokeshaves is too thick a shaving. Cured by putting some metal flashing behind the blade. It is supposed to shave, its not a draw knife.

skuthorp
04-12-2010, 07:48 AM
I use a fine convex shave for paring leather, the best tool I've found for the job. I also have more extreme convex and concave shaves I use for oars, paddles, tillers, chair legs and such. I have several old wooden shaves as Bob described too but they are a pest to keep adjusted as they have all had hard lives. Just another collection I guess.

Bob Smalser
04-12-2010, 08:06 AM
Thanks all. My Stanley clogs easily....

.... I have opened the mouth with a file a couple times. It seems that as the blade wears I need to open the mouth more.



Bingo. As Basil says, this sounds like your problem.

Read my description above about tin snips cutting ribbon. Shaves are basically planes, but without the stability of a long sole. To cut cleanly without clogging, you need a relatively narrow mouth and fine setting. It's impossible to take a fine shaving with a mouth too wide because one end of the ribbon isn't being held taut, and those coarse shavings tend to curl over and hit the edge of the mouth rather than clear up and away.

You need a new shave. Start with a $15-dollar #151 and learn to use it. If you want a more expensive shave you can buy one later. Otherwise I suspect there are plenty of other tools you can use that money for.

Like a drawknife.

http://pic20.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/7081299/91841729.jpg

And set of rasps.

http://pic20.picturetrail.com/VOL12/1104763/7081299/93859833.jpg

Tom Robb
04-12-2010, 12:24 PM
I got pretty a LV wood handled iron shave as a present. Works great and just looking at it feels good. Made in Canada feels right somehow too.
I'd go for fixing an old Stanley if I found one, but beyond all doubt, I'll ever attain Bob's level of craftsmanship so the fixing process, for me, would be quite a learning experience. I did fix up a hardware store Stanley smoothing plane several years ago. Now it works ok for me, but it took several days of tedious effort. The process left a bad feeling in me for Stanley Works.

goodbasil
04-12-2010, 01:17 PM
...and if you do find a Stanley/Record #151/#152 that you wish to soup-up get yourself one of these extra thick, better steel cutters from LV.
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p=60545&cat=1,50230&ap=1
and your cook'in with gas.

Lazy Jack
04-12-2010, 01:34 PM
By far, the best spokeshave I have ever used is the old Stanley 53 with the adjustable throat, which simultaneously adjusts the depth of cut. They can be tricky to set, because the blade is fixed with a single set screw, but once set, the throat opening adjustment allows you to easily set the depth of cut. Great for concave surfaces , just open the throat a little as the piece becomes more and more concave. There priced on E-Bay like the 151s but a much more useful tool IMO.