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PeterSibley
04-02-2010, 06:44 PM
There a trick to jointing a board wider than the bed of the planer .I saw it once in a copy of Fine Woodworking , but can remember how ! :confused:

Can anyone remind me ?

Ron Williamson
04-02-2010, 07:02 PM
Wider than the bed of the jointer,perhaps?
Yes,but you need too remove the porkchop guard and keep your shirt tail out of the pointy bits.
R

Rich VanValkenburg
04-02-2010, 07:48 PM
I gave up on the tricks and just rip it in half, joint each half, joint the edges and biscuit join and glue them back together. I can never see the glue joint.

Otherwise it's as Ron said but it's also dangerous and won't get a cup out of the board.

David G
04-02-2010, 08:07 PM
Peter,

I didn't see that article, but here's how I've always done it --

As Ron says, it involves removing the guard so you can, essentially, cut I large rebate (as wide as the knives). So - with an 8" jointer, and a 10" wide board, you end up with a 2" untouched stepdown. One then does a temporary infill - say 1/4" ply secured with carpet tape - and runs the board thru the planer (presumably wider, usually at least 12") with the infill side down.

Once the opposite side is fully planed smooth and parallel with the rebate, one flips the board again, removes the infill and carpet tape, and planes off the stepdown.

Oh, and if the board is too wonky to end up with a full clean rebate with one pass, one will usually have to stick a filler piece onto the infeed table, lower the table sufficiently to deepen the rebate, and make another pass. The filler piece is necessary because the typically wider infeed table won't allow another pass without it.

Clear as mud?

PeterSibley
04-02-2010, 09:11 PM
Peter,

I didn't see that article, but here's how I've always done it --

As Ron says, it involves removing the guard so you can, essentially, cut I large rebate (as wide as the knives). So - with an 8" jointer, and a 10" wide board, you end up with a 2" untouched stepdown. One then does a temporary infill - say 1/4" ply secured with carpet tape - and runs the board thru the planer (presumably wider, usually at least 12") with the infill side down.

Once the opposite side is fully planed smooth and parallel with the rebate, one flips the board again, removes the infill and carpet tape, and planes off the stepdown.

Oh, and if the board is too wonky to end up with a full clean rebate with one pass, one will usually have to stick a filler piece onto the infeed table, lower the table sufficiently to deepen the rebate, and make another pass. The filler piece is necessary because the typically wider infeed table won't allow another pass without it.

Clear as mud?

Quite clear David ,thank you .:) That was the sequence I worked out in my head last night trying to go to sleep !

I will occassionally be needing to prepare small panels for document boxes .8 or 9 inches is about as wide as will ever be necessary .I've been trying to work out how to use my 6" jointer to do the job rather than buying one of those cheap conbination machines .

Something like this
..http://www.carbatec.com.au/carba-tec-10-planer-thicknesser-cabinet-base_c19276.
It would be convenient but I have no idea how reliably accurate it would be .

coelacanth2
04-02-2010, 09:16 PM
There's always the lazy coward's method...take it to a shop where they have a really wide jointer...
I am a very lazy coward.

Ron Williamson
04-02-2010, 09:38 PM
It's not really that difficult or unpleasant,but yiv goot to keep yer wits aboot ye,lad.
And use the push blocks.
Most times it's good enough even if the face isn't completely flattened or there is a wee ridge down the centre of the panel, as long as you go gently through the planer afterwards.
R