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Nicholas Scheuer
03-24-2010, 06:25 PM
Ya'know, those metal racks used in a file drawer from which hanging file folders are suspended.

I probably put myfirst set of them together in our U S Army, Third Missile ("Miserable") Batallion Operations Office back in the early 1960's.

Working as I have in the Engineering offices in a varierty of industries for over forty years, I've put a lot more of them together over the years since.

Now my wife needed four drawers set up for hanging files, and having been an Elementary School Teacher for a long long time, had not a clue how to put hanging file racks together.

What I noticed was this, there were no plastic parts; in fact the components haven't changed at all since 1960. Isn't that amazing? How many other ubiquitous articles of hardware do we see in our every-day lives that haven't changed over a period of fifty years?

Moby Nick

elf
03-24-2010, 07:15 PM
And nowadays they don't even require a screwdriver to assemble.

If they're cheap enough.

Keith Wilson
03-24-2010, 10:15 PM
How many other ubiquitous articles of hardware do we see in our every-day lives that haven't changed over a period of fifty years?Hmm - paper clips, pencils and manual pencil sharpeners (the good ones, anyway). Bic pens. Many hand tools.

OconeePirate
03-24-2010, 11:27 PM
I make my living with a tool that hasn't changed significantly since 1929, and that design was more or less based on an 1899 patent.

Bob (oh, THAT Bob)
03-25-2010, 12:03 AM
And they don't make'm like they used to. I've found HEAVY vertical file cabinets at various thrift and surplus shops, you know, the ones with military inventory tags on them they are so old. Made in Yooo-Suh. Man, will those suckers hold some heavy weight in the drawers with no adverse effects. Smoooth ball-bearing drawer slides. You can even pull out multiple loaded drawers without them tipping over, the cabinets themselves are so heavy. They make great tool cabinets, ammo cabinets, pot and dishware cabinets for the kitchen (some might object to my, um, style of decoration). The new file cabinets these days are only slightly thicker than tin foil, the front faces bend if you sneeze at them, then the drawers jam.

Nicholas Scheuer
03-25-2010, 06:19 AM
We know what you mean, Bob.

Last week we were in the market for a 4-drawer file cabimet for my wife to sort and keep her recently passed mother's extensive family and community records.

We first tried the ordinary sources like Office Depot, Office Max, and WalMart. Strangely, WalMart no longer seems to have steel file cabinets, though I got a 2-drawer unit from them 12 years ago. Whatever, we were not impressed with the quality of any but the most expensive.

Next we went to a place called Used But Nice located in a couple of old multi-story buildings in a shabby area of town. There we found a nice old Steelcase file cabinet for less than OD or OM wanted for new offerings.

When we got it home we discovered that the latch pawl for one of the drawers is missing. No sweat, the other 3 drawers have the latch to copy from, so I can make a simple steel latch bracket from stuff in my "Miscl Steel" drawer and attach it to the cabinet with a pop rivet. The thing is, there is enough to the overall structure to make atachment straightforward and easy.

OconeePirate doesn't seem to want to tell us what his "tool" is, doies he?

Don't know what elf puts hanging file racks together with, but I used a Craftsman 1/4" ratchet socket wrench as the preffered alternative to a screwdriver.

Moby Nick

OconeePirate
03-25-2010, 08:38 AM
OconeePirate doesn't seem to want to tell us what his "tool" is, doies he?

C'mon... you could have clicked on my user info and found out easy enough. I'm a tattoo artist.


As far as filing cabinets go... Mine is probably 100 years old, oak or something, stacking modular thing, has a beautiful all wood slide system for the drawers, so I'm no help for finding a good cabinet.

David W Pratt
03-25-2010, 08:41 AM
I've thought that about frozen veggy boxes.
There are bags and microwaveable packets and such, but those cardboard boxes are the same as 50 years ago.
Condensed milk cans too.
Pocket knives.
Hammers
Nails

OconeePirate
03-25-2010, 08:45 AM
I've thought that about frozen veggy boxes.
There are bags and microwaveable packets and such, but those cardboard boxes are the same as 50 years ago.
Condensed milk cans too.
Pocket knives.
Hammers
Nails

Only difference now is that much of that stuff has "Made in China" on it now.

skuthorp
03-25-2010, 08:50 AM
I use a couple of those cabinets for tool drawers. Got one on a council throw out. But my best find were two seven drawer wooden plan cabinets being sold as 'firewood'. Some years ago now, now they are 'antiques'!

katey
03-25-2010, 10:23 AM
How long have box knives been around?

oznabrag
03-25-2010, 12:24 PM
http://www1.istockphoto.com/file_thumbview_approve/496719/2/istockphoto_496719_paint_can_opener.jpg

OconeePirate
03-25-2010, 02:20 PM
https://www.zimlogistics.co.za/images/KIWI%20SHOE%20POLISH%20BLACK.jpg

And if they ever change the smell you'll know the end is near.

Nicholas Scheuer
03-25-2010, 02:47 PM
Discovered sump'm 'bout them tin KIWI containers back in my Army days in the Third Miserable Batallion; if the KIWI gets old and cracked, and you put the bottom half over heat to melt it down into a puddle to get rid of the crack, the liquid polish will leak out past the rivet in that little lever on the side.

Now if the leaking liquid polish drips on the gas flame used to heat the stuff, it gets REAL exciting.

Noticed a vivid contrast in Tattoo Parlors recently, OconeePirate.

We drove past a centrally located one here in Rockfrd about 10:30 one Saturday evening on our way home from a Synphony Concert. It's one of those Parlors with garish illustrations in the windows, garish neon lights, and you can see hundreds of even more garish patterns displayed on the walls inside. We figured it was open that late waiting for customers to work up enough courage in the various taverns around town.

Then last weekend we walked past on a street in Eau Clare, WI popular with college kids. The decor of the Parlor was more like a refined coffee shop or intimate French eatery, some ferns and potted plants, a few discreet illustrations, nicely dressed chicks waiting to serve customers,or maby they were customers, who knows?

Moby Nick