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J. Dillon
03-14-2010, 04:47 PM
Can you spot and identify the tools their using / in sight? How about the specie of wood ?

http://img697.imageshack.us/img697/8304/16indiacarpenteratwork1.jpg

http://img693.imageshack.us/img693/2944/17indiacarpenters2.jpg

J. Dillon
03-14-2010, 04:55 PM
Donn, See your Opthamologist.;)

Gee I hope I spelled it right.:o:(:confused:

JD

Peerie Maa
03-14-2010, 04:58 PM
Its not a pencil:p:D

PeterSibley
03-14-2010, 04:58 PM
Lump hammer
An old Ryobi motor plane
an Indian version of a Stanley #5
An axe with a short handle .
Wood bodied jointer
Hand saw
Donn's red pencil
Tape

The timber ?No idea ,but better than most timber I saw in use over there .

PeterSibley
03-14-2010, 05:00 PM
Its not a pencil:p:D

It sure looks like one !

Peerie Maa
03-14-2010, 05:20 PM
Lump hammer
An old Ryobi motor plane
an Indian version of a Stanley #5
An axe with a short handle .
Wood bodied jointer
Hand saws
Donn's red pencil
Tape

The timber ?No idea ,but better than most timber I saw in use over there .

Axe or Adze?
A couple of chisels with white handles.

chasbartlett
03-14-2010, 05:43 PM
India Rosewood and the local teak.

seanz
03-14-2010, 06:20 PM
Some very interesting stuff.....especially the safety boots.
Are the chisels homemade?
Why is there a pruning saw handle on that English pattern saw blade?

There's some pincers and a couple of interesting hammers in the first shot.

The Bigfella
03-14-2010, 06:22 PM
Don't forget the tape measure, the monster water bottle... and the big plastic bag.

Michael D. Storey
03-14-2010, 06:26 PM
Some very interesting stuff.....especially the safety boots.
Are the chisels homemade?
Why is there a pruning saw handle on that English pattern saw blade?

There's some pincers and a couple of interesting hammers in the first shot.

The entire world does not wear safety boots, or gloves or goggles. You should see how they tear apart ships.
I reckon that there is a different handle on the blade than what you may have expected is because of necessity and the desire to feed their families.

Many fine things are made in other parts of the world with much less than what we have, and we should note their achievements.
I bet they all drink out of the same water bottle. I bet that there is not a Hindi word for 'backwash'.

Peerie Maa
03-14-2010, 06:28 PM
Why is there a pruning saw handle on that English pattern saw blade?



They maybe cut on the pull stroke?

BrianW
03-14-2010, 06:39 PM
They are certainly quite fashionable carpenters.

oznabrag
03-14-2010, 07:01 PM
Looks like they're building a handicap ramp.

PeterSibley
03-14-2010, 07:13 PM
and it's surprisingly good timber for India , an expensive job .

seanz
03-14-2010, 07:16 PM
I reckon that there is a different handle on the blade than what you may have expected is because of necessity and the desire to feed their families.

Ya reckon? Feed their families? What an insight you have.

The blade looks like it's from a multi-blade saw set....the ones with 3 or 4 blades and one handle with wing-nut (it's been so long since I typed that in a non-pejorative sense) that you can swap between blades. So the old handle has probably been lost, it happens.
On the other hand.......maybe there is a reason behind it, maybe with that sort of handle on that saw it is 'just the thing' for a particular job.
I'd like to know.
I've got at least half a dozen of those blades............

And I'm shopping about for some open-toed sandles too.
;):D

SamSam
03-14-2010, 07:34 PM
I think the guy on the left in the second photo is using his fingernails to smooth down that beam. Laying your saws and chisels on the concrete seems a little backwards.

BETTY-B
03-14-2010, 07:44 PM
I bet they all drink out of the same water bottle. I bet that there is not a Hindi word for 'backwash'.

Actually, public drinking cups at drinking locations are common in India. And no one touches their lips to it. It takes a little while before you get good enough not to pour it all over yourself.

StevenBauer
03-14-2010, 07:48 PM
Judging from the shavings there was more handplaning going on than power planing. Around here that lighter shade of blue would be a Makita, not a Ryobi planer.

Looks like fine work.

Steven

Phillip Allen
03-14-2010, 08:17 PM
doesn't look like teak to me

Noah
03-14-2010, 08:53 PM
an Indian version of a Stanley #5


I say #6 or #7 (no way a #8). Looks longer than a #5 to me.

seanz
03-14-2010, 09:05 PM
5 1/2?
:p

Looks around the right length for a 5 going on a 6 but it does look as wide as a 6.....it's really hard to tell from a photo.....trust me.;):)

Mr Dillon, did you take notes?
:)

chuckm
03-14-2010, 09:06 PM
I've bought two India versions of the stanley planes. I found their metal to be quite good; took an edge. Definately better than china steel. I judge the quality of what they build by the tools that the men of that particular nation make. I believe India's future products will be quite good.

PeterSibley
03-14-2010, 09:45 PM
I say #6 or #7 (no way a #8). Looks longer than a #5 to me.

I concede !:D

Concordia...41
03-14-2010, 10:03 PM
Apparently India doesn't have Home Dreadfuls... :rolleyes:

Hundreds of images come up in my Google search for handicap+ramp+wood. None of which show the craftsmanship or the wood quality in the India pictures.

Oh. Wait. Maybe we're not quite so superior..... ;)

http://www.62644.com/2008/WheelchairRamp_1131.jpg

The Bigfella
03-14-2010, 10:03 PM
I've got a busted bit of a genuine Stanley #5 sitting in front of me... waiting for me to get a replacement. I reckon its a casting flaw. Really crappy.

chasbartlett
03-14-2010, 10:09 PM
Phillip the raw teak they would be working with will be much lighter than what you are accustomed to seeing on boats...over there it' known as Gao mun.

bobbys
03-14-2010, 10:24 PM
I think that's really the customer service dept in India for computer Qs.

Shang
03-14-2010, 10:32 PM
I lived across the road from the timber merchants in New Delhi. There were no doors for the warehouses, so in the evening the guys built palisades of huge teakwood beams across the doorways.

Phillip Allen
03-15-2010, 06:55 AM
Phillip the raw teak they would be working with will be much lighter than what you are accustomed to seeing on boats...over there it' known as Gao mun.

the teak I have worked with seemed a bit yellow that just doesn't look right to me...it may very well be teak but not like the teak I worked with

Syed
03-15-2010, 11:56 AM
In subcontinent 'professionalism', I guess has different meanings.;) Carpenter, blacksmith, barber, cobbler, tailor, musician, etc are all family businesses and these skills traditionally travel within families, father to son.
In rural areas this divide is quite significant.

I hope you enjoyed the rickshaw ride (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AGopO5-7OfE) in Jaipur.

Tristan
03-15-2010, 03:42 PM
As you are a writer, a correction, "specie" is money. "Species" is used either singular or pleural to indicate a "kind" of plant or animal. Example: This is a species of oak or these are three species of oak. Sorry, but I taught biology too long to let it pass. Cheers.

J. Dillon
03-15-2010, 04:10 PM
Yes we took three rickshaw rides. One in Old Delhi going / returning in Varanasi on the Ganges river. All three were something to remember especially at night through packed streets with tourists and pilgrims returning from seeing the waterfront spectacles.

Below is one of several shots I managed to take in Old Delhi. After viewing the link provided by Syed, I'd say that one did not depict just how crowded, ear splitting and conjested as the two Johanna and I experienced in Varanasi. Besides the road was so pot holed that I feared we would capasize many times.:eek:

http://img691.imageshack.us/img691/4731/32indiarickshawmadness.jpg

JD

oznabrag
03-15-2010, 04:25 PM
..."specie" is money...

Even more specifically, it is money in the form of coins. ;)

goodbasil
03-15-2010, 04:37 PM
I see a knee vise in the first photo.

seanz
03-15-2010, 04:56 PM
>:D

BarnacleGrim
03-15-2010, 05:15 PM
Its not a pencil:p:D
What is it, then?

Peerie Maa
03-15-2010, 05:28 PM
What is it, then?

A right handed gronicle from a long stand.

They are not normally red, this one must be Indian made.