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cs
03-10-2010, 12:37 PM
It is official, we are open and ready to business.

http://photos-d.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc3/hs452.snc3/25901_101506716553888_100000836795414_47137_480647 3_n.jpg

Chad

BrianW
03-10-2010, 12:53 PM
Hours?

Open on Sundays?

Nice looking shingle Chad. Why do I get the feeling that somewhere close by there's a big crate missing it's lid? :)

John of Phoenix
03-10-2010, 12:55 PM
I'll take a case of MREs please.

cs
03-10-2010, 12:56 PM
24 hours a day and 7 days a week with free delivery on Sunday.

That sign was a welcome present from squadron, welcoming us into the fold. We shipped it via stratair.

Chad

cs
03-10-2010, 01:10 PM
I'll take a case of MREs please.


Remember, this is the Army. First we need a memo from on 0-6 or higher explaining the need for the MRE's, than we need a perstat memo from you commander showing how many are present for duty, and than as a minimum order you will have to get a 3 days supply for the number of boots on the ground. All this will need to be submitted on a DA 3161 to the Class I yard 2 weeks prior to the actual day you will need it. But first you need to get it signed off by theater command. Once the order has been approved and ready for delivery than we can delivery. Don't forget your DA 1687 and Assumption of Command.

Chad

John of Phoenix
03-10-2010, 01:16 PM
Good grief, I did say "please".

http://www.woodenboat.com/forum/images/icons/icon3.gif I know, I'll get a clipboard.

seanz
03-10-2010, 01:16 PM
First we need a memo from on 0-6 or higher explaining the need for the MRE's, than we need a perstat memo from you commander showing how many are present for duty, and than as a minimum order you will have to get a 3 days supply for the number of boots on the ground. All this will need to be submitted on a DA 3161 to the Class I yard 2 weeks prior to the actual day you will need it. But first you need to get it signed off by theater command. Once the order has been approved and ready for delivery than we can delivery. Don't forget your DA 1687 and Assumption of Command.




I love it when you talk 'Army'.........;):p

All the best.

cs
03-10-2010, 01:52 PM
Good grief, I did say "please".

http://www.woodenboat.com/forum/images/icons/icon3.gif I know, I'll get a clipboard.


A clipboard? Of course now you are talking about Class II. This will require a completely different 1687 and another Assumption of Command. First we will have to place the order in PBUSE and than upload the order to SARS and await shipment to the SSA. Check your status in PBUSE and expect shipment with 2 to340 days, that is unless they cancel your order. If so re-order. Check the status code and make sure that you ordered enough to meet the minimum order requirements. Once the order comes in you will need to acknowledge receipt of the shipment in PBUSE and upload your status to SARS. And don't forget your PIN number for the SSA yard and your DODAC.

Chad

Phillip Allen
03-10-2010, 02:19 PM
looks like CS is in a good mood :)

Paul Pless
03-10-2010, 02:25 PM
I love it when you talk 'Army'.........;):p
> :D

Ian McColgin
03-10-2010, 02:39 PM
Remember that in ordinance, as in christianity, it is more blessed to give than to receive. Stay safe.

cs
03-10-2010, 03:15 PM
Feeling pretty good tonight. Was able to get off work at five and watch a movie and eat some homemade cookies.

You guys may think I'm joking, but business is ran pretty much as listed above. For example, the other day I was directed to turn in a vehicle. With the directive I was given certain property book items to turn in with it. Not included in this package was 2 pieces of equipment, so I didn't prepare them or the paperwork. Each piece of equipment requires a turn in document and a 2404 (maintenance inspection basically). In addition some of the equipment has to be "zeroed" and a memo for each piece of equipment. Than you have to have a memo from an O-5 or higher about no brass no ammo and no human remains. You have to take all that documentation to one place and get document numbers and than the paperwork and equipment to another for an inspection by the Air Force (of all people) and than the paperwork has to be signed off by a civilian.

But back to the story, one particular piece of equipment I was not directed to turn in caused a bunch of headaches. It appears that there is a new memo out there that says that this piece of equipment has to be turned in with the vehicle, but nothing came down to my level about it. I stood on their desk kicking and screaming, hurling out things like combat effectiveness of my unit and bringing my squadron commander down to talk to them. I even had a memo from a full bird colonel saying I was not to turn in that piece of equipment and that still wasn't enough. Finally they agreed to transfer me one from a completely different unit (clear across post BTW) so I could get it zeroed and than turn in that piece with my vehicle.

Bottom line is it took 3 days to get all this done and that is not counting the prep time getting the initial paperwork and the truck preped. The last day of this ordeal the squadron S-4 told me not to come back till it was done. I got up bright and early and jumped on my Polarias and went clean across post to this other unit and picked up what I needed. Took the lateral transfer back to the TPE office. I than went to have the item zeroed and to get the memo. I than took that piece of equipment to turn in with the vehicle, which was in "frustrated" status. And than get it all inspected and the paperwork finalized.

Yep, the paperwork and BS can be frustrating.

Chad

John of Phoenix
03-10-2010, 03:53 PM
Thank God they brought back the helicopters I had to leave behind or I'd still be filling out paperwork.

switters
03-10-2010, 04:39 PM
Why supply hates lance corporals

while pouring over microfiche one night ordering more o-rings and what not that keeps a hydraulics shop working I ran upon the number for an inflatable rubber raft. Just for fun I added it to the order. Kaneohe bay was right at the end of the flight line, we could always use it if one showed up. I assumed it would be denied right off the bat and we would have a good laugh. Apparently, it went far enough up the chain of command that I got hauled out of bed the next morning (working night crew) and had to explain to the SMAJ why I felt our shop needed a rubber raft. Dancing on the carpet, with gunny behind me, who gave me a weekend of corrosion control and 7/14 day inspections. In retrospect I probably got of lightly.

Best of luck, keep your head down.

BrianW
03-10-2010, 06:29 PM
Interestingly enough, when we moved to another FOB, the LZ was practically a junk yard full of brand new stuff. All scattered around, soaking up the occasional rain, and blowing around with each passing helicopter.

For John, there were pallets of MRE's and some sort of platoon sized MRE meals in a box. Clipboards, thousands of HP printer ink cartridges, wheel barrels (needed assembly), wall clocks, calculators, reams of paper, tide detergent, general purpose (GP) cleaner, plywood, 16ft 2x4's, etc, etc...

No forms required. ;)

A month later, and they're still trying to clean that stuff up.

htom
03-10-2010, 07:44 PM
Typical Army. Didn't paint the background, the left hand brace is leaning, and it's already been graffitied.

;)

Good to hear from you.

cs
03-10-2010, 11:15 PM
Yeah I know about the TN. The sign maker screwed that up as well as 1SGT (it should be just 1SG).

Chad

paladin
03-10-2010, 11:17 PM
Vietnam was lovely....the paperwork alone to obtain goods from the army (and being an air force unit) meant quadruple the paperwork......so...we took a truck, very good mufflers, during happy hour...drove over to the big red one and loaded up the flatbed (6 guys) with plywood, 2 x 4's sheet iron corrugated roofing etc...a refrigerator or two air conditioners etc......and I betcha they filled out minimal paper work for losing it. we even got a 206 helicopter under similar circumstances.

John of Phoenix
03-11-2010, 08:52 AM
Crossed cannons on a Cav guidon? An artillery battery called a troop?

It's all very strange.

George.
03-11-2010, 09:29 AM
http://photos-d.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc3/hs452.snc3/25901_101506716553888_100000836795414_47137_480647 3_n.jpg

What's that wire running down the wall, and what happens if it gets cut?

Phillip Allen
03-11-2010, 11:05 AM
http://photos-d.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc3/hs452.snc3/25901_101506716553888_100000836795414_47137_480647 3_n.jpg

What's that wire running down the wall, and what happens if it gets cut?

Chad's butt falls off

cs
03-11-2010, 12:04 PM
Crossed cannons on a Cav guidon? An artillery battery called a troop?

It's all very strange.


That is what makes us so special and unique. We are artillery, just attached to the Cav. Our unit was made up of artillery folks just for this mission. The Cav has taken us in as one of their own. They call us R Troop. That sign pays tribute to all of it. We have the Cav background to show that we are rolling with the Cav and than the cross cannons show where we come from. The unit crest on your right is the crest for the 278th ACR and the unit crest on your right is the 230 Brigade (who we originally belong to). If you notice above Troop R is the crossed sabers. BTW the squadron CSM loves the sign and the other "true" Cav troops are jealous.

BTW that wire you see is going from Top's TV to the antenna on the roof. Cut it and top loses AFN and than nobody is happy.

Chad

Nicholas Carey
03-12-2010, 01:22 AM
Thank God they brought back the helicopters I had to leave behind or I'd still be filling out paperwork.The US military bureaucracy has nothing on the Soviet Army's. :D

A little family story...

My mom's family checked out of Latvia whilst the Wehrmacht was duking it out with the Soviet Army in 1943-1944. My grandfather was educated and in the Latvian National Guard...putting him on the Soviet's kill list.

When they decided to leave, my grandfather checked out a horse and wagon from his guard unit so as to facilitate moving the family. They took it from Daugavpils, on the Soviet frontier, where they lived. When they got to Riga, they managed to get on one of the last refugee ships out before the Soviets shut things down. They just left the horse and wagon on the pier in Riga. My mom says it was the saddest thing, as the ship pulled away from the pier, to see the horse, still in his traces, just standing on the pier.

Now bear in mind that (A) the Latvian quartermasters and bureaucrats were subsumed into the Soviet system, and (B) we have an expensive piece of unaccounted for gear.

In 1975, the Red Cross refugee/D.P. folks were kind enough to forward to my grandparents a dunning notice from the Soviet Army looking for return of the aforesaid horse and wagon or reimbursement for the same. It took somebody 30+ years, but they finally managed to track down, across a world war, the miscreant who hadn't returned the horse and wagon.

Needless to say, my grandparents didn't bother to grace the Red Army with the honor of a reply. :D

bobbys
03-12-2010, 03:20 AM
It is official, we are open and ready to business.

http://photos-d.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc3/hs452.snc3/25901_101506716553888_100000836795414_47137_480647 3_n.jpg

Chad.

Our neighbor was First Sergeant in the Guard here.

He was retired long ago after 4 heart attacks and was in his 80s.

I went to check on him and he was in the yard reading the Combat field manual.

Said they might call him up and he needed to be ready to go..

He had a decoration for being at Pearl Harbor while in the Navy he wore on his uniform.

Said that always confused everyone as that would be extremely rare.