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coelacanth2
03-09-2010, 07:09 AM
Since we're talking sandwiches below, what's your favorite hot stuff and why/how used?
Feller gave me a bottle of "Peri-peri" from South Africa/Madagascar area. Brutal. Have a bottle of "King Cobra" (childish me, it had a cool bottle, peppers were smoked, 'tho you can hardly tell), day - to - day is "Cincoteague wild pony".

mmd
03-09-2010, 07:23 AM
Erica's Hot Sauce from St. Vincent and the Grenadines. I have a buddy there send me up a bottle everytime the one in the fridge gets low.

Best ever was a shop-prepared hot sauce at the little Rastafarian restaurant a quarter -mile up the road from the boat shop in SVG. The place had the wonderful name of "Papa Spoon's Rasta-raunt" and Papa Spoon made a hot sauce that was just wonderful. Sadly, not to be sold by the bottle, though...

Bruce Taylor
03-09-2010, 07:35 AM
https://www.giftlandofficemax.com/images/Matouk%27s%20Hot%20Pepper%20Sauce%20300ml%20$320.j pg

A tasty Trinidadian Scotch Bonnet sauce. I go through a lot of it (or rather, it goes through me).

paladin
03-09-2010, 07:59 AM
Siricha.....made from those tiny little Thai peppers...a couple or three steps above Oppenheimer's Formula.

Uncle Duke
03-09-2010, 08:07 AM
I'm a huge fan of "Uncle Brutha's" - both #9 (Chile Verde, Garlic & Ginger) and #10 (Four Chilies & Garlic)
Deep rich flavors and a great aroma. Not the hottest, just the best tasting.

Hailed by celebrity Chef Rahman "Rock" Harper as "The Best Hot Sauce on the Planet,"
http://www.unclebrutha.com/sites/default/files/images/UB_AS_10_5oz_NB.png

Popeye
03-09-2010, 08:11 AM
what is with yous guys and hot sauces ..

might use a dash in chili or a caesar , or something , a bottle of tabasco lasts me a whole year

Draketail
03-09-2010, 08:14 AM
Habanero Pepper Sauce

(otherwise known as Bob and Baldy’s Habanero Heat)

From: The Whole Chile Pepper Book
By, Dave DeWitt and Nancy Gerlach
Little, Brown, and Company, 1990
ISBN 0-316-18223-0

Ingredients:

12 Habanero Chiles, stems removed, chopped
½ cup chopped onion
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
½ cup chopped carrots
½ cup distilled (clear, white) vinegar
¼ cup lime juice

The published recipe:

Cooking the chilies reduces the distinctive flavor of the Habaneros in this liquid sauce, so add them raw. The high percentage of both acetic and citric acid keeps the sauce from spoiling.

Sauté the onion and garlic in oil until soft.

Add the carrots with a small amount of water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer until the carrots are soft.

Place the mixture and the chilies in the blender, and puree the mixture until smooth.

Combine the puree with vinegar and lime juice and simmer for 5 minutes to combine flavors.

Strain the mixture into sterilized bottles and seal.

Yields about 2 cups of sauce

And as modified by Bob and Baldy:

First, we make the sauce in batches of 10 times the recipe, so, the ingredients are as follows:

120 Habanero Chiles, stems removed, chopped
5 cups chopped onion (about 5 baseball sized onions)
20 cloves garlic, minced
vegetable oil (olive oil preferred) as needed to cover the bottom of a large pot for the sauté step
5 cups chopped carrots (about 6 large carrots, shredded)
5 cups distilled (clear, white) vinegar
4 cups lime juice (the juice of 10 limes is about right). Be sure to include the any lime pulp that ends up in the juice

Second, some modifications to the above recipe as made by Bob and Baldy:

The Habaneros are prepared by removing both the stems and the internal webbing and seeds. All that is left is the outside, orange skin.

We add a touch of salt and some, (about 2 tablespoons, but we’ve never measured it) cumin.

We add about a dozen finely chopped red peppers (cayenne’s, Serrano chilies, whatever) after the puree step to give red flecks of color to the finished sauce.

A food processor is very helpful for shredding the carrots, chopping the onions, garlic, and chilies.

An orange juicer helps with the limes.

Adjust the consistency of the cooked sauce to just slightly thinner than store bought spaghetti sauce. Use additional vinegar to get the right consistency.

Be sure to wear latex gloves when processing this many chilies. Bob neglected to do so one year and couldn’t feel his hands for 4 days. And, Bob says, using the restroom was quite an experience!

Good ventilation is very helpful when cooking the sauce. It’s not unusual for Cindy to leave the house to escape the fumes!

StevenBauer
03-09-2010, 08:25 AM
Anyone try this:

http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r241/bauerdad/IMG_3151.jpg


:eek:



Steven

Kevin G
03-09-2010, 08:27 AM
On your Kashi??

KG

Mrleft8
03-09-2010, 08:49 AM
Baron's is my current favorite. Grace is a close second. Matouk's is good.....Chief is good. But sometimes the recipe really calls for something less..... And that's when I reach for the Frank's red hot.

Popeye
03-09-2010, 08:58 AM
the reason those peppers taste 'hot' has nothing to do with 'heat'

the sensation is caused by the capsicum dissolving the flesh on your tongue and inside your mouth

me .. i tend to enjoy dining without excess face sweating , eyes watering and gums bleeding .. jus saying

Popeye
03-09-2010, 09:06 AM
thanks donn , instead of a glass of milk , i think ill go get me a colloidal fat suspension in water

i raise a certain distilled phenolic drink to your good health ..

LeeG
03-09-2010, 09:10 AM
Trader Joes has an excellent tomatoey hot sauce called Jalapeno Pepper sauce. It looks like thin catsup and isn't overpowering on any flavoring. Balanced is what I'd call it.

TapaTios is always good for a kick, it's like Tabasco with flavor.

there's a slew of boutique hot sauces that I've come across but nothing beats the surprise of cooking with jalapenos. Sometimes you can get one that can be eaten raw like a bell pepper and sometimes you get one that makes the tongue go numb, scalp sweat BEFORE the heat/pain kicks in.

LeeG
03-09-2010, 09:13 AM
Good ventilation is very helpful when cooking the sauce. It’s not unusual for Cindy to leave the house to escape the fumes!



I remember when a restaurant in Oakland had to clear the kitchen and stop operations for a couple hours because they did too large of a batch of hot sauce. A few folks had a hard time breathing.

John of Phoenix
03-09-2010, 09:49 AM
As you might expect, there are a number of stores that specalize in Mexican food here in Phoenix. That sauce Fred has pictured, Cholula, is sold in gallon jugs. Very good stuff.

pefjr
03-09-2010, 09:58 AM
A squeeze bottle, stuffed with your own ingredients, covered with white vinegar, set up for one week, makes a creation of your own.

I use different peppers for different strength, vary the ingredients of onion garlic, etc.. Use different vinegars also. Keep adding vinegar as used. Lasts a long time

Mrleft8
03-09-2010, 10:03 AM
Cholula is very good..... A slightly smokey flavor.

Popeye
03-09-2010, 10:04 AM
what kinda flavor is a monkey ?

LeeG
03-09-2010, 10:06 AM
ahh, happiness is a shelf stocked with condiments. Give me a bag of rice, head of cabbage and a few onions and I can make cardboard taste good with enough spices and condiments.

So many spices, so little time.

LeeG
03-09-2010, 10:07 AM
what kinda flavor is a monkey ?

you've been to the zoo right?

John of Phoenix
03-09-2010, 10:17 AM
I had monkey meat in rice paper in Vietnam once. It looked like an egg roll. Similar to pork as I remember. Pretty good actually.

switters
03-09-2010, 10:24 AM
cholula for every day, and a whole shelf of strange ones to play with.

We have a local place, Horsetooth hotsauce, that makes one called the O face, that is very flavorful and good on grilled chicken.

Popeye
03-09-2010, 10:24 AM
save the monkeys

jonboy
03-09-2010, 10:30 AM
Laurens van der Post's recipe in 'First catch your Eland' takes some beating....Piri-piri is a common table condiment here and ranges from the above, a colonial Portuguese /Mozambique recipe of puréed red chilis and peppers with lemon juice, simmered and strained... to my fave, simply a jamjar half full of fresh red chilis covered in olive oil and left for a few weeks... resultant concoction can be cut with more oil, or whiskey, or vinegar if you want it milder...no cooking, not so deadly...
If you want deadly there's a recipe for Sambar powder that requires dry frying 100gms 2 cups of dried red chilis.......it is not possible to do this inside...I nearly killed myself and left the kitchen genuinely uninhabitable for hours.I'm not joking. The only way is ouside on a breezy day and then watch the sparrows drop out of the trees....The powder after adding the usual other stuff, cumin coriander etc is dangerous...don't think just another curry powder....it makes vindaloo (vino de alho, another Portuguese invention) seem mild. It will certainly sort out your Farmer Gile's the next day.
Harissa from Morocco, and Wasabe or any fresh horseradish too..

John of Phoenix
03-09-2010, 10:31 AM
One of our mechanics had a pet monkey he kept on a leash. The monkey loved him and hated everyone and everything else. That was the meanest animal I've ever seen.

Popeye
03-09-2010, 10:33 AM
'cheeta' was a female , the males were way to aggressive and difficult to train

and the nasty bits didn't make for good tv

Keith Wilson
03-09-2010, 10:34 AM
This is good for normal use - reasonably hot but still very tasty.

http://ep.yimg.com/ca/I/mex-grocer_2094_69059931

Dave's Total Insanity Sauce for when I want to abuse myself.

Popeye
03-09-2010, 10:56 AM
Not true (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cheeta)

Besides, Cheeta was a chimpanzee, not a monkey.

bzzt .. true ..

"Cheeta has been usually been characterized as male, but sometimes as female, and has been portrayed by chimpanzees of both sexes."

Cheeta, a female chimpanzee born about 1948 owned by Ed Rogers, stated to have appeared in 42 films, including Tarzan films as Cheeta and the television program Truth or Consequences (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Truth_or_Consequences) as Beaulah. Died at age 9 on September 6, 1957 in Cypress, California, shot by deputy sheriffs after breaking out of her cage, attacking her owner, and charging at a group of children

Krunch
03-09-2010, 11:01 AM
Dave's Total Insanity Sauce for when I want to abuse myself.

+1

This stuff is also good, though it has a bit too much habanero (which to me is bitter) for my taste:

http://www.andyshotsauce.com/images/1871.jpg

switters
03-09-2010, 11:02 AM
Dave's Total Insanity Sauce for when I want to abuse myself.

Not sure whether to report that post or not? Sounds like it's own punishment though. I usually save my la victoria for breakfast burritos.

Popeye
03-09-2010, 11:03 AM
i been trying different paprika's lately , some of them are very hot and smokey

http://www.hotpaella.com/paella-supplies-spices-spain/Pimenton-de-la-Vera-from-Spain.jpg

sort of a dry version of bottled hot sauce but with some added dimensions

stevedwyer
03-09-2010, 11:05 AM
A friend of a friend makes this stuff. A pinhead amount is all that's required.
Still trying to figure out whether it belongs in the kitchen or in my weapons chest!
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/4189KJHBRBL._SL500_AA280_.jpg
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/images/B0000DG4N7/ref=dp_image_text_0?ie=UTF8&n=16310101&s=grocery

Keith Wilson
03-09-2010, 11:05 AM
Dude, you eat it. (This is a man with a seriously weird mind.). :D

http://ep.yimg.com/ca/I/hotsauceworld_2088_77959557

pwilling
03-09-2010, 11:28 AM
Now THIS is a thread I can relate to . . . the true epicure has to go where the stuff is -- China, down-home "la-jiao" wherever - Hunan, Szechuan - India, a myriad of combinations of mango, fenugreek, asafoetida (well named), coriander . . . Indonesia -- sambal or "cap" (pronounced "chap", the original ke-chap) of infinite variety, made up on the spot from a dozen plants round the garden -- my favorite is Tempoyeh, made on a base of fresh durian, by a winsome Benkulu girl in the cool dawn of a mountain morning . . . unforgettable.

Mrleft8
03-09-2010, 11:37 AM
Then there's that stuff that only grows in St. Frozenstine...... Dattal or sometthing like that...... Good stuff, not too hot, good flavor.

Nicholas Carey
03-09-2010, 11:43 AM
Frank's Red Hot Sauce -- flavor, not just heat. Aged New Mexican cayenne peppers, vinegar, salt, garlic.

Far better than any of the tobasco-style hot sauces.

Sadly, a few years back, when they went to the new bottle design, they "improved" the product by replacing the fresh garlic in favor of garlic powder :mad: :( Still good...just not as good as it used to be.

http://tripinbrooklyn.files.wordpress.com/2007/12/franksbottleshot1.jpg

huisjen
03-09-2010, 11:44 AM
For everyday use:http://i278.photobucket.com/albums/kk110/fredz859/WoodenBoat/cholula.jpg


I used to have that as a favorite, until I found this:

http://www.hotsauce.com/v/vspfiles/photos/1856CG-2T.jpg

Dan

David G
03-09-2010, 11:48 AM
OK - no one has mentioned Frank's - which is what we keep in the refrigerator at all times. For hotter fare, we are always trying something new. Latest is Patak Hot Mango Chutney I picked up to go with a beef curry I made.

Mrleft8
03-09-2010, 12:05 PM
OK - no one has mentioned Frank's - which is what we keep in the refrigerator at all times. For hotter fare, we are always trying something new. Latest is Patak Hot Mango Chutney I picked up to go with a beef curry I made.

I mentioned Frank's way back there, and just 2 posts above you is a picture of Frank's......I use Frank's when making chicken wings....... Good flavor, mixes well with butter, and not too hot.

huisjen
03-09-2010, 12:28 PM
The dominant taste of Tobasco is vinegar, and not much else. I don't know why people like it.

Dan

LeeG
03-09-2010, 12:29 PM
+1

This stuff is also good, though it has a bit too much habanero (which to me is bitter) for my taste:

http://www.andyshotsauce.com/images/1871.jpg

I remember that, forget the context but it was ok. Oh yeah, those bbq wings I made. whew.

OconeePirate
03-09-2010, 12:57 PM
For everyday use Texas Pete. There is also a green habanero based sauce I use alot, can't remember the name, it's one thats easily available at the grocery store. Really plain bottle.

I agree with Paladin that the Siricha is good stuff. I think its kind of cool that the Mexican restaurants around here are starting to put it on the table.

I had some stuff from New York of all places that I really like, Tamarack Sap maybe? The datil pepper stuff from St. Augustine is good too.

Lately I've been eating regularly at the new Indian place down the road so I'm starting to build more of a tolerance to hot sauces. The cook likes me and my brother because the same night that he had some a-hole whine and cry and demand his money back after ordering the hot curry we told the waitress thats the heat level we wanted.

David G
03-09-2010, 01:08 PM
I mentioned Frank's way back there, and just 2 posts above you is a picture of Frank's......I use Frank's when making chicken wings....... Good flavor, mixes well with butter, and not too hot.

I gotta quite saying, "... no one has mentioned" :rolleyes:

OconeePirate
03-09-2010, 01:38 PM
Larry, we got a good price on a 12oz. bottle, but it languished on the counter probably three months being used a little at a time. By the time the color changed, it ceased to look appetizing enough to see if the taste changed as well.

I have a bottle of Tabasco here at work that hasn't been in the fridge for God knows how long. It has turned brown and separates but still tastes fine.

Popeye
03-09-2010, 01:41 PM
it languished on the counter probably three months being used a little at a time. By the time the color changed, it ceased to look appetizing enough to see if the taste changed as well.

probably starting to ferment and sour

toss it

OconeePirate
03-09-2010, 01:48 PM
The primary ingredients in most sauces are vinegar, peppers, and salt. Shouldn't they keep pretty much indefinitely? I'd imagine the color change is just from exposure to light.

Bobby of Tulsa
03-09-2010, 02:32 PM
Okay. Looking around, it seems light is the main culprit. Cool and dark is apparently best. Found this from Tabasco:

“Original TABASCO® brand Pepper Sauce has a shelf life of 5 years (opened or unopened) when stored in a cool place, but it’s best if used by the third year. TABASCO® brand Garlic Pepper Sauce and TABASCO® brand Habanero Sauce have a shelf life of 2 years, while TABASCO® brand Green Jalapeño Pepper Sauce and TABASCO® brand Chipotle Pepper Sauce have a shelf life of 18 months. Any TABASCO® brand product will be good throughout its respective shelf life, even after the bottle has been opened. Once a bottle of sauce is opened, the color may change, but the product won’t spoil. Refrigeration almost always helps to slow this process but isn’t required.”
Tabasco is fermented in oak barrels before it is bottled. What could go wrong after that??

Popeye
03-09-2010, 02:36 PM
Tabasco is fermented in oak barrels before it is bottled. What could go wrong after that??oxidization , bacteria

Bobby of Tulsa
03-09-2010, 04:13 PM
oxidization , bacteria

And.

Flying Orca
03-09-2010, 05:55 PM
As far as condiments go, I'll second the votes for Frank's (the chili and lime is awesome on almost anything) and sriracha hot sauce. Cock Brand (yes, really) is known in my circles as "cock sauce", and is probably a more common table condiment than tomato ketchup.

Tobago
03-09-2010, 09:33 PM
Ah boy, you go get your Trini Bake and Shark or roti and ask for plenty pepper...

'dehn you know yuh pepper!

Excelsior,
Ted

paladin
03-09-2010, 10:08 PM
Everyone I knew in Vietnam carried a bottle or two of Tabasco in their packs or somewhere close...it's the only thing that kills the taste of C rats.

Sriracha Hot Sauce Recipe

Fill a container half full with peeled garlic cloves. Fill the rest of the way with 2 (at least) habaneros and a mix of dried serrano and cayenne pods that have been stemmed but not seeded. Add 1 tablespoon of non-iodized salt and fill the container (to cover chili pods and garlic) with 5% strength white vinegar. Cider vinegar or wine vinegar will work but will give you a different flavor.

As the chili pods re-hydrate top up the liquid with water or vinegar. After a few days to a week of steeping in the vinegar dump the whole mess into the food processor or blender and puree until a smooth, thick consistency is reached. If the mixture is too thick it may be thinned with vinegar or water.

The resulting sauce is tangy, quite garlicky and very tasty. Mixed 50/50 with tomato sauce (American catsup) it makes a very nice seafood cocktail sauce. Or ir can serve as a salsa on tortilla chips. It’s very versatile.

purri
03-09-2010, 11:01 PM
save the monkeys
for dinner.

purri
03-09-2010, 11:04 PM
Have a dekko at your local Asian foodstore for regional varieties.

paladin
03-09-2010, 11:07 PM
Sasha apparently liked fresh monkey, especially when someone caught it and kept it on a chain for her.

Bob Adams
03-10-2010, 06:51 PM
Dude, you eat it. (This is a man with a seriously weird mind.). :D

http://ep.yimg.com/ca/I/hotsauceworld_2088_77959557

+1 A bottle of Dave's last's me over a year. A little dab will do ya!

SMARTINSEN
03-10-2010, 07:57 PM
http://www.storesonline.com/images/common/imagewrap.img?picture.image.url=http://www.storesonline.com/members/1512336/uploaded/dabomb_ground_zero.jpg&picture.width.max=200

A friend had some of this, but it was too hot for anyone to eat and enjoy, so after it languished in the refrigerator for over a year, he ended up tossing it.

L.W. Baxter
03-10-2010, 09:56 PM
http://www.sammcgees.com/img/1285/a-taste-of-thai-garlic-chili-pepper-sauce_1_orig.jpg

Not particularly hot, but very tasty.

PatCox
03-10-2010, 10:18 PM
There are a lot of hot sauces that are just out there to be the most absurdly hot things you can get, they are not serious hot sauces, they only exist so macho men can claim to like them, and play "try this" games with them, this would include Dave's Insanity, Mad Dog Inferno, and many other similar hot sauces.

For chicken wings, Franks, or Crystal, are just fine, tabasco is too bitter.

For really hot, but still full of the flavor of the pepper, the mexican habanero sauces are fine.

But for real, deep flavors, in addition to heat, I think the line of sauces from the Pain is Good company, which makes the Jamaican style sauce thats been pictured here, is the best line of hot sauces on earth. Their Louisiana style is simply the best, the most richly flavored, very very garlicky version of a hot Louisiana style, is a secret ingredient in many of my dishes, and their bloody mary mix is the best in the world, hands down.

PatCox
03-10-2010, 10:26 PM
Paladin, its my understanding that almost every MRE contains one of those tiny little tabasco bottles, I thought they were actually produced for the military.

Siriracha sauce, the asian one made in California, we call it "cock sauce," because it has that cock on the label, is fantastic, great combo of garlic and heat, but it also has much more sugar than american hot sauces, and this can make it clash with western dishes.

The greatest spicy flavor combination in the world is the basic spicy thai flavor combo. Spicy thai food is based on a combination of hot, sour, sweet, and piquant. This is not traditional thai, but I find that a combination of lime juice, lemongrass, bird peppers, cilantro, brown sugar, fish sauce, and toasted sesame oil, is nirvana.

C. Ross
03-10-2010, 10:29 PM
This is my favorite "wicked hot but it still tastes like something" sauce.

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/21K8V28BJSL._SL500_AA246_.jpg

PatCox
03-10-2010, 10:39 PM
Just to reiterate, my spicy thai bloody mary martini, consists of, two tablespoons of clear tomato essence, the clear, slightly pink liquid that drains out of diced tomatoes if you put them in a seive and put it over a bowl, place this in a shaker, add some finely sliced lemongrass, some finely sliced garlic, some chopped cilantro, and some sliced fresh thai hot peppers, and a little salt, you need salt in this, and take a muddler (does anyone know what a muddler is anymore?) and crush this up in the bottom of the shaker, then add ice and vodka, and shake the living hell out of it, and put it in a martini glass. I have not tried this yet, but I am thinking just a hint of fish sauce would be nice, too.

When I tried my deli venture, I offered a thai chicken salad, and it uses that classic combination of chilis, fish sauce, cilantro, and sesame oil, and the kids who worked for me, kids who never ate asian food before, took to calling fish sauce "crack," because it was addictive, they loved all the dishes that had fish sauce in them, and even though they found straight fish sauce revolting, they found that dishes that had fish sauce in them were simply addictive, like crack.

I like the golden baby brand.

Everyone should find their nearest asian grocery, all of these inredients cost 1/10th what they do in a regular store, in an asian grocery.

Asian cooking is very highly dependant on the use of prepared condiments, it seems overwhelming, the number of asian condiments, prepared sauces, but if you learn how to use just a few of them, asian cooking is actually easier than french cooking, in which every sauce is made from scratch, most asian sauces are mixes of several prepared condiments you buy in a bottle, the skill is in which ones, and how much. Its a very different way of cooking, but once you get it, its easier. How do you think asian restaurants can offer 150 different items? Its just different combinations of the sauces that come in jars.

Flying Orca
03-10-2010, 10:50 PM
Pat, we need to trade recipes one day. I have a Laotian salad that is to DIE for.

I remember experimenting with drinks like yours when I was getting into southeast Asian cuisine. These days my quest is for the perfect margarita.

paladin
03-10-2010, 11:06 PM
Patcox...good original Sriracha sauce dunno got sugar in it...and the recipe bout the spicy Thai sauce is good also, but we always put an absolute minimum of sugar in it, usually palm sugar....
I know I'm getting close when I make a batch and a local lady friend stops by to check some things, and I give her a taste of the most recent batch and ask "Laun?" and if she says "mai Laun" I know it nrrds more work...if I see sweat beads on her head I'm getting close....Her husband stopped by one day and asked what I was cooking and I sat him down with some Thom Yum Gai, and I think his ears started smoking.....and he's Thai. He thinks Americans are nuts...

seanz
03-10-2010, 11:24 PM
.

I like the golden baby brand.

Everyone should find their nearest asian grocery, all of these inredients cost 1/10th what they do in a regular store, in an asian grocery.



Golden Baby Brand is the best......and it's not just because of the trippy picture...

The other reason for finding your local Asian shop (or supermarket) is the variety.....and the weird stuff.:eek:;)

Right now my favourite hot sauce isn't all that hot....Thai sweet chilli.......a French roll, some roast chicken, lettuce and some sweet chilli.....yum. :)

Oh, who else wants to go over to Chuck's place?
:cool::D

OconeePirate
03-10-2010, 11:35 PM
Has anyone that cooks with peppers a lot tried anything with ghost peppers yet? They're from Indian I believe and seem to be the trendy thing right now in hot hot peppers. They're higher on the (Scoffield?) chart than habaneros.

Barbeque joint around the corner from me has a sandwich that is free if you finish it. Being an idiot of course I had to try. It tasted nasty. I'm fairly certain they just ran a bunch of the dry peppers in a blender and through them on the sandwich. It was like trying to eat flaming pinestraw. I'd likely have managed to finish if they had made the sauce properly and not just loaded the thing down with dry pepper chunks.

jonboy
03-11-2010, 08:47 AM
A question for the experts here - What's the best way to store an opened bottle of hot sauce? We used to buy a large bottle (lower price), but didn't use it fast enough. The sauce started to lose its orange-red color and turned brownish. Does refrigeration prevent this, or should I just keep buying small bottles more often?


keep it out of the light, don't think the fridge will help

seanz
03-12-2010, 03:56 AM
Who needs hotsauce?

Stupid works too........

Last night by mistake I put an extra spoon/shovelfull of cayenne pepper into the chilli....mmmm spicy.

paladin
03-12-2010, 08:26 AM
Chili shouldn't get extra spicy, destroys the flavor. Ya want it thick so it won't run off the corn tortillas...

Popeye
03-12-2010, 08:29 AM
....Last night by mistake I put an extra spoon/shovelfull of cayenne pepper into the chilli....mmmm spicy.

stir in a little sour cream , or add a dollop to the bowl when serving , takes the heat out