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J P
03-08-2010, 05:33 PM
February 2010.
Multi day sea kayaking trip off the Coromandel peninsula New Zealand.
My partner and I in two single kayaks (plastic).
Pictures taken between periods of tropical cyclones, tsunamis, volcanic eruptions, gales and torrential rain rain rain.

“Plan A” was to paddle up the upper east side which is open to the Pacific, go around the top, the notorious Cape Colville, and down the west side in the Hauraki Gulf. Of course, nothing ever goes as planned ... sooo we allowed for some flexibility.

The remains of tropical cyclone Rene were just missing the NZ East coast and the MetService weather forecast looked okay for the five days we figured the trip could take; not too much rain, maybe. The cyclone had kicked up a northeasterly but the forecast had the wind easing to 10 knots and the swell to one meter or less.

The day before our trip departure there was still a 2 meter easterly swell (and it wasn’t raining) so we went to our launch area in Whangapoua to sus out our options and play in the surf, sans boats.

We decided to launch at high tide in Whangapoua Harbour instead of the beach. There were some breakers on the bar but we picked a slot and had good timing getting through.


http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y279/picsonline/NZ%20Feb%202010/m_IMG_8886.jpg


The bar at the entrance to Whangapoua Harbour. Interesting waves, traveling just about 90 degrees to each other. Mercury islands in the distance.


Nice and calm back in the estuary. SWIMPAL's inner child getting a little exercise.


http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y279/picsonline/NZ%20Feb%202010/m_IMG_8879.jpg




Lots of interesting basalt formations on this coast.


http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y279/picsonline/NZ%20Feb%202010/m_IMGP6271.jpg

J P
03-08-2010, 05:34 PM
First night we pulled into a neat little bay where you have to thread through some rocks to get in. Always interesting to make a first landing somewhere you haven’t seen before. We hadn’t planned on staying there but with a headwind, tiring first day muscles, and not enough daylight to make the next likely landing spot, we made camp.

http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y279/picsonline/NZ%20Feb%202010/m_IMGP6269.jpg

Nice quiet morning.

LeeG
03-08-2010, 05:37 PM
pretty, pretty, pretty. So how big were the breaking waves ?

LeeG
03-08-2010, 05:38 PM
http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y279/picsonline/NZ%20Feb%202010/m_IMGP6269.jpg

Nice quiet morning.

what's for breakfast?

Willin'
03-08-2010, 06:35 PM
Paddle by that hot water beach, didja?

Very nice, thanks.

J P
03-08-2010, 06:56 PM
Lee, out there on the main break they were around 6ft. the day before our launch. When we went through it was about the same tide level but things had settled a bit and we hit a good slot over about a meter and a half non breaking swell. Didn't see any of those side waves either but I was look'n.

Hot muesli and coffee and fresh fruit for breaky.


Willin', I have done that but not this trip. We started a bit north of there this time. Later after our kayak trip we did go there for lunch and a swim.:eek: If it's been a while since you've been there you might not recognize it. Campground's gone, big houses ... Best time I've been there was in the rain at night.

Willin'
03-08-2010, 07:15 PM
Lee, out there on the main break they were around 6ft. the day before our launch. When we went through it was about the same tide level but things had settled a bit and we hit a good slot over about a meter and a half non breaking swell. Didn't see any of those side waves either but I was look'n.

Hot muesli and coffee and fresh fruit for breaky.


Willin', I have done that but not this trip. We started a bit north of there this time. Later after our kayak trip we did go there for lunch and a swim.:eek: If it's been a while since you've been there you might not recognize it. Campground's gone, big houses ... Best time I've been there was in the rain at night.

Best we just keep our memories then, I guess. Rain at night sounds like a fun time though.

Carry on with the rest of the pictures, please.

J P
03-08-2010, 07:16 PM
Looking for a lunch spot on a vast white sand beach.

http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y279/picsonline/NZ%20Feb%202010/m_IMGP6274.jpg



We chose the less clouded end.

http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y279/picsonline/NZ%20Feb%202010/m_IMGP6280.jpg


Since this is one of my favorite places on the planet I suggested we just stay there for the rest of the trip.
"No ..." she says, "not our style, sensible people would do that, WE haven't suffered enough yet."
So it was just lunch, a swim, and onward.

J P
03-08-2010, 07:33 PM
Some of the Kiwi boaters will probably recognize this rock. Pretty much a roadless part of the coast. Lovely little bay protected from the north and east. Looked deep. Lots of crayfish (lobster) pots in this area. Only boat we saw for hours on this section was one working his pots.

http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y279/picsonline/NZ%20Feb%202010/m_IMGP6290.jpg


.

John B
03-08-2010, 08:03 PM
Nice pics JP ... I'm a bit lost though . Whangapoua then heading North... the white beach can't be New chums?( its too close) so?

J P
03-08-2010, 08:16 PM
Waikawau


Probably raining and miserable there now. ;)
I like how they've preserved the dunes and there are only a couple farms around. Any houses are tucked over in Little Bay.

We did spend some time at New Chums the day before we took off. Surprisingly not crowded for a Saturday. About a dozen surfers had just left when we got there. Kind of a shore break in there. Better surf at Whangapuoa.

John B
03-08-2010, 08:18 PM
Ahh, we stopped in at Little (bay)beach Waikawau and didn't make it over to the big one.

The Bigfella
03-08-2010, 08:21 PM
Lovely. More please.

LeeG
03-08-2010, 08:24 PM
what are the water temps?

John B
03-08-2010, 08:32 PM
22C about now. Christmas they started at 17 and stayed 18 19 ish through most of jan . By about the 20th or so they went 20 and the fish came in!

J P
03-08-2010, 08:44 PM
Thanks John. I go kind of blank when it's in "C". I was going to say comfortable enough for swimming.

Hey, I tried a little softbait fishing. You got my interest in your cruise thread. Lots of fun.

John B
03-08-2010, 08:52 PM
I'm looking forward to more pics:D

J P
03-09-2010, 05:04 PM
Well, I'm afraid I don't have anything terribly exciting. Those parts required two hands on the paddle. :D

I haven't figured out what this is, anybody know what kind of critter it came from?

http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y279/picsonline/NZ%20Feb%202010/m_IMGP6325.jpg

http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y279/picsonline/NZ%20Feb%202010/m_IMGP6327.jpg

J P
03-09-2010, 06:14 PM
So, moving on up the coast from Potiki Bay (pic above with rock) to Port Charles was about a 2 ½ hour paddle. Not sure I even took any pictures in that section. Very rugged steep rocky shore and not many options for landings, especially with the northeasterly. Bit of a commitment. Wind was picking up and lots of crazy water from the waves reflected off the cliffs. SWIMPAL paddles like hell when she gets a little scared so it was about all I could do to keep up.

One little event about halfway through this section, right where you don’t want an event, the boat that was doing the pots earlier was returning to Port Charles throttled up and heading straight towards us. Hmmm ... We were about 75 yards off the shore/cliffs and near some awash rocks and the water was going every which way. We turned sideways to be more visible but he just kept coming straight on. Got to the point where it wasn’t looking good, had to assume he didn’t see us, so we moved quickly towards the cliff and rougher water. I hollered at SWIMPAL to turn and get ready for the wake. He finally suddenly dropped the throttle 20-30 yards from where we had been. Nothing happened, but geeze, got the whole Pacific out there. Maybe he figured we could use a little adrenaline jolt. SWIMPAL paddles even faster when she’s mad.

Taking a much needed break in Port Charles. Not sure what the seaweed collecting is for. I tasted some, not bad ... tastes like ... the sea.

http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y279/picsonline/NZ%20Feb%202010/m_IMGP6293.jpg

J P
03-09-2010, 06:29 PM
Moving on ...

http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y279/picsonline/NZ%20Feb%202010/m_IMGP6300.jpg

and into Stoney Bay, another favorite place. A 32 K day.

http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y279/picsonline/NZ%20Feb%202010/m_IMGP6302.jpg

http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y279/picsonline/NZ%20Feb%202010/m_IMGP6344.jpg

Wonderful old Pahutukawa trees there.

http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y279/picsonline/NZ%20Feb%202010/m_IMGP6341.jpg
.

John B
03-09-2010, 06:39 PM
32 k !:eek:

When we were going past Port Charles at christmas we had a 3 m swell and no wind.. we decided to save it for another trip and carried on to Whangaparapara at Gt Barrier.
We also had a 'can he see us or is he on AP' moment from Barrier to Auckland ...right out in the middle past Horn rock. He was just tucked down in his big fast fishing boat and steering close for a look I suppose. Us .. we had the horn on deck and the crew all roused and ready....

J P
03-09-2010, 07:20 PM
32 k !:eek:

Yeah, we were pretty consistent pulling ourselves around by our arms at 5 k an hour. 6 1/2 hours that day, figure oh, about 17550 paddle strokes each. Did I mention something about suffering earlier. In the last pic, she in the tree is looking out to sea, away from me, dreaming wistfully of sailboats, big ones, and the nice things sensible people do with them on their vacations. :rolleyes::D

As we were schlepping our gear up from the boats to make camp a nice elder gentlemen came over and brought us some hot coffee and cookies. Said "Where did you come from? You look a bit tired. Just sip this while you're getting sorted out. Don't worry about the dishes, we'll catch up tomorrow." Just great Kiwi hospitality.

J P
03-09-2010, 08:16 PM
Next day we were to go around the cape. The weather was changing as it does in those parts. I was able to pick up the NowCasting weather service on VHF. The swell and wind was picking up again. We were in good position to catch the flood tide and the swell and wind would be either on our beam or following and going with the current. I reckoned it would take us about 1 ½ hours to get to the next sheltered (maybe?) landing place and 2 ½ - 3 to get all the way around.

Stoney Bay opens to the NE and the waves were coming straight in. They really plump up as they enter the bay. We had decided to at least try the first leg while it was early before the winds got stronger so off we went. Ha! Just getting out of the bay, big sets rolling in, when the wind started up and didn't look like it was going to stop anytime soon. Another hundred yards and SWIMPAL, dissapearing in and out of the swell, shouts "No, I am NOT going out in this #!@%^ ... &*#@!" in that voice I know means she's not kidding. Not even. "Ooookay," I says, "lets tuck in over there in Shag Bay where it's more protected."

Shag Bay

http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y279/picsonline/NZ%20Feb%202010/m_IMGP6307.jpg

We ended up staying there for the day and night. Had to bushwack up to that ridge to get radio. Would have been easier to paddle out to get reception but it felt good to stretch the legs and explore the flora.

http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y279/picsonline/NZ%20Feb%202010/m_IMGP6319.jpg

Found that the easiest going was under the larger tree ferns. Their fronds, or whatever they are called, drop on the forest floor and keep the undergrowth down.






http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y279/picsonline/NZ%20Feb%202010/m_SANY0063.jpg

.

J P
03-09-2010, 08:32 PM
Shag Bay right below. Caught a little snapper for dinner off those first rocks.

http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y279/picsonline/NZ%20Feb%202010/m_SANY0113.jpg


From whence we came. South and East. Port Charles around the second little head.
http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y279/picsonline/NZ%20Feb%202010/m_IMGP6350.jpg

Where we wanted to go, around the pinnacle. North and West. Great Barrier island is off in the distant right.
http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y279/picsonline/NZ%20Feb%202010/m_IMGP6356.jpg

.

John B
03-09-2010, 09:36 PM
Good call by the sounds. Colville channel is one of those places you take some extra care.. it funnels any easterly swell into a narrow channel and wind against tide can turn into something truly epic. It acts like any cape I suppose, and wind strengths are typically higher there than anywhere else in the gulf.
I'm really enjoying this thread jp, and I live here!:D
( Being Mr roofer man today , I've done 2 x 2hr stretchs up there on the galv iron sunbed.. nearly dropping of heat exhaustion. Now all is good , I have a beer, I'm inside , and I'm reading your thread)

whysit in the bilge? as a matter of interest.

skuthorp
03-09-2010, 09:57 PM
Great thread JP, Such a beautiful coast. My sea kayak is a recent acquisition, most of my kayaking has been in K1's and TK1's. Won't get much in this season now as we've just built and there's heaps of stuff to do. First paddle though I rolled the boat deliberately before I remembered how to get it up again. (Under water upside down thinks 'This way, no, that's not right. Like this? No. Ooops! Got it!)

Zane Lewis
03-11-2010, 03:46 AM
Great thread.
Spent a lot of time sailing, driving and tramping those area.
If that cray boat was out of Port Charlies I know where he lives.
looks like you have been to 3 stone bay
http://i260.photobucket.com/albums/ii39/zqlewis/Places/ScreenShot020.jpg?t=1268296777

Port Charles
http://i260.photobucket.com/albums/ii39/zqlewis/Places/ScreenShot019.jpg?t=1268297040

http://i260.photobucket.com/albums/ii39/zqlewis/Places/ScreenShot017.jpg?t=1268297093

Second what John said that coast around the top is not a place to take chances in, get very rough, windy and lots of tide races.

Zane

LeeG
03-11-2010, 04:34 AM
Stoney Bay opens to the NE and the waves were coming straight in. They really plump up as they enter the bay. We had decided to at least try the first leg while it was early before the winds got stronger so off we went. Ha! Just getting out of the bay, big sets rolling in, when the wind started up and didn't look like it was going to stop anytime soon. Another hundred yards and SWIMPAL, dissapearing in and out of the swell, shouts "No, I am NOT going out in this #!@%^ ... &*#@!" in that voice I know means she's not kidding. Not even. "Ooookay," I says, "lets tuck in over there in Shag Bay where it's more protected."



staying in the comfort zone is a good idea, what absolutely gorgeous country

John B
03-11-2010, 02:28 PM
One of the questions I was going to ask you JP , has been part answered here
kayak (http://www.woodenboat.com/forum/showthread.php?t=111165)

But where did you get the boats?

also , this post gives me an opportunity to try out this
linkygimmickthing (http://www.woodenboat.com/forum/showthread.php?t=111176)

J P
03-11-2010, 05:19 PM
Glad a few of you have enjoyed the thread. It's been fun for me to go back through the trip though it's starting to seem more like a dream now. Snowed here at home yesterday.

Thought about posting above John but there's really nothing woodenboaty about it. Some of these kinds of thing don't float for long down here. I wished I had snapped a pic of a cool little old dried out wood boat that was a lawn ornament (I think?) in someones yard in Whangapoua. Sailboat, 20ft or so, with a cabin. Reminded me of an Oughtred Eun Mara. Remembered seeing it there last trip a couple years ago.

We got the boats from Outdoor Discoveries (http://www.odnz.co.nz/contact-us.html). They were great to deal with (thanks Liz!) and very accommodating, going out of their way to meet us for pick up and drop off near the airport. We had our own trailer. In addition to the boats they supplied paddles, spray skirts, splash jackets, pfd's (though I brought my own), paddle float, pump, repair kit, tow rope, and high visibility vests. They were one of the only companies I could find that would do a freedom rental (gear only, no guide) and had 2 single kayaks available. We prefer singles to doubles (divorce boats) and with just two of us going it was a safety consideration as well.

The boats were 16ft Necky Eskia's (http://www.neckykayaks.com/kayaks/touring/eskia_polymer.shtml) and they worked well for our purposes. Quite stable and I like the way they handled on the water though pretty rudder dependant for turning. Good secondary stability right up on edge and they aren't particularly difficult to roll. SWIMPAL is around 110-115lbs and didn't have any trouble. She has better roll technique than I do. The outfitting was comfortable but we put a folded half of a foam sleeping pad on each of our seats to raise us up a little.


Get the roofing done? That can be thirsty work!

Phillip Allen
03-11-2010, 05:25 PM
Well, I'm afraid I don't have anything terribly exciting. Those parts required two hands on the paddle. :D

I haven't figured out what this is, anybody know what kind of critter it came from?

http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y279/picsonline/NZ%20Feb%202010/m_IMGP6325.jpg

http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y279/picsonline/NZ%20Feb%202010/m_IMGP6327.jpg

Did anybody ever answer that question? It looks like it ought to be a skull but could it be a pelvis?

J P
03-11-2010, 05:33 PM
Great thread JP, Such a beautiful coast. My sea kayak is a recent acquisition, most of my kayaking has been in K1's and TK1's. Won't get much in this season now as we've just built and there's heaps of stuff to do. First paddle though I rolled the boat deliberately before I remembered how to get it up again. (Under water upside down thinks 'This way, no, that's not right. Like this? No. Ooops! Got it!)

Good on ya getting that roll. Gets harder with each failed attempt and you just start thinking "air!". It's just not a natural motion to do, especially keeping the head down to the last, that's what usually gets me. Hope you can find time to get out.

J P
03-11-2010, 05:42 PM
Did anybody ever answer that question? It looks like it ought to be a skull but could it be a pelvis?

No answer yet. But you know, you might be right. Hadn't thought of that. Maybe a bird pelvis of some kind?

J P
03-11-2010, 06:38 PM
Great thread.
Spent a lot of time sailing, driving and tramping those area.
If that cray boat was out of Port Charlies I know where he lives.
looks like you have been to 3 stone bay

Second what John said that coast around the top is not a place to take chances in, get very rough, windy and lots of tide races.

Zane

Thanks so much for posting those images. I meant to post a Google Earth image with our track on it but it's on another machine. Google Earth was a useful tool for trip planning. There were a few sections of the coast I had never seen and I looked on GE for possible landing places that I could put on the maps I was making. I wouldn't have trusted them 100% but it turned out to be very accurate.

"3 stone bay" is it? Very nice spot. I seem to recall you and JohnB discussing that one here a few years ago and I filed it away in the "someday ..." part of my brain. Thanks for that.


If that cray boat was out of Port Charlies I know where he lives.How big a fella is he?;)
The cray boat went into Port C. after doing the rounds on all the pots in Potiki. I saw the name written on the floats. If you see the fella tell him there's a guy in Montana that would like to have a beer with him. :D Actually, I'd be interested in hearing what his perspective of it was, if he even recalls. I have a lot of respect for Kiwi boaters in general. I guess he either didn't see us or was coming for a look, maybe thought "hey, those dorks might need some help." :D

PeterSibley
03-11-2010, 06:40 PM
An email and photo to your local museum of natural history will give you the answer quick smart !

J P
03-11-2010, 09:08 PM
staying in the comfort zone is a good idea, what absolutely gorgeous country

Comfort zone? That would be back at Waikawau beach, wondering if the beer was still cold.:D

It’s important to recognize and respect the different comfort zones people have. Sometimes I’ll encourage a little nudge past it if conditions and circumstances are within someone’s abilities, including my own. Sometimes you just have to and sometimes you never know until you try.

One time when SWIMPAL was getting a little ‘concerned’ out there I reminded her of the stuff she’s done kayaking whitewater; more technical and difficult water, in squirrelly little boats and little room for mishaps.
"... and here we are in these big stable boats, yeah the water is kind of big and rolly, and a little windy, getting choppy on top, but we have decent sea room off the waves crashing on the rocks and cliffs, and if by some freaky chance one of us tipped we could tow out for even more room if needed to sort out our rescue … or get chomped by sharks trying."
She acted like she didn't hear me but I saw her roll her eyes.
I think it was about then we noticed the boat bearing down on us.




An email and photo to your local museum of natural history will give you the answer quick smart !

But surely, here in this vast pool that is the bilge, where so many come with bones to pick ... ;)

John B
03-11-2010, 09:43 PM
That bone looks like it's had lightness added so I'd go boid component too.

Yeah I survived the roof day 2 by adding beer and a big lie down. Its not even very much but I think I have a low heat threshold.( could never be an Aussie.)

Where's todays pics eh?.. I'm wondering where you'll go to after Port Jackson.

J P
03-12-2010, 03:24 PM
Got side tracked with reality/work. Not too much left for pics. Well there’s heaps, but they’re probably not very interesting except to us; JP loading the boat, JP unloading the boat, JP checking the radio …

Here's one I like from Shag bay.
http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y279/picsonline/NZ%20Feb%202010/m_IMGP6335.jpg

A bit anticlimactic, we never did go around the cape. We made another attempt at an early start but the wind was up by 8:30, as usual, and the swell had gotten bigger. 10-12 footers at the mouth of the bay, no kidding. Starting to get surfed if you weren’t real careful. Not enough experience in these particular boats for that and not the place. Over the wind I heard the “No !@&^%ng way!” call again. That comfort zone thing. Waves, wind, shore exposure, commitment, unknowns up ahead, overcast … Change one or two of those and you get back in the “zone”. Always amazes me just the psychological influence overcast versus sunny can have on us.

We waited another day and the forecast had the wind shifting around to the SW which would be a headwind on the other side. Food was holding up but our preferred evening beverages were gone, maybe two days to get to Colville store, nothing to prove, on vacation to have fun, needed time with the family … so we called in our ride. Had a day to just hike around and relax.

You’re right about the wind out there on the cape John. Listening to the NowCasting go around from Bream to Mercs it was always stronger at Channel Is. “… peak two niner … average two four … from zero seven seven …” Great service that nowcasting except every time I’d listen it would change. :D

In hindsight, if we had headed out before dawn, say 5:30-6:00, we might have beat the wind but the tide wouldn’t have been ideal. Probably would have camped at Fantail Bay south of Port Jackson. Then down to the islands. Wanted to get out to Happy Jacks, Rabbit … then wander on down to “home”. Maybe another time. It's all good.

George.
03-12-2010, 03:35 PM
Don't tuataras occur there? Seen any?

J P
03-12-2010, 03:52 PM
Don't tuataras occur there? Seen any?

Didn't see any that I'm aware of though I did see 'something' scurry under some rocks a couple times and I thought "lizard?" Gets your attention because there are so few 'crawly' things on land there. Makes for some relaxing camping and bushwhacking.

I wonder how tuataras do with all the 1080 out there?



eta: You've got me reading up some more on them. Fascinating!

Tuatara (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuatara)

Tuatara probably have the slowest growth rates of any reptile,[11] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuatara#cite_note-encyclo-10) continuing to grow larger for the first 35 years of their lives.[5] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuatara#cite_note-KCC-4) The average lifespan is about 60 years, but they can live to be well over 100 years old.[5] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuatara#cite_note-KCC-4) Some experts believe that captive tuatara could live as long as 200 years.[53] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuatara#cite_note-CNNDad-52)

John B
03-12-2010, 04:29 PM
Shame you were headed like that JP but as you say a holiday is a holiday.. did you keep the boats and go out on the Thames side... Double island and Happy jack are interesting.
I've never seen a Tuatara in the wild.. you probably saw skinks ... typically about 4 or 5 in long.

George.
03-12-2010, 04:35 PM
Didn't see any that I'm aware of though I did see 'something' scurry under some rocks a couple times and I thought "lizard?"

Not lizards. Very primitive.

J P
03-13-2010, 02:07 AM
Not lizards. Very primitive.

Yeah, would have been very cool to see one.
I just saw some movement.
Would have been thrilled to see a skink too, I take them as a good 'sign'.



.. did you keep the boats and go out on the Thames side...

We had the boats for the two weeks we were there and other than our east side excursion we day-tripped on the Thames side.

We were planning on going out to the islands by Coromandel the day the tsunami warning went out. I hadn't been been paying attention to any news at all (holiday mode) but happened to be up early and checking the weather on metservice before leaving. Caught a little sentence that said something like TSUNAMI WARNING FOR ALL OF COASTAL NZ. Just all caps, nothing too bold or flashy, and a little note: see civildefense.gov for more information. I then checked the news and learned of the awful earthquake in Chile, and the media was going full on. Fortunately, as it turned out, not much happened locally, but oof, so tragic for poor Chile.

J P
03-13-2010, 02:21 AM
Next day we went up to Te Kouma, where the mussel barges come in, and went out for a day. Went by The Spirit of New Zealand anchored in the harbour.
http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y279/picsonline/NZ%20Feb%202010/m_SANY0189.jpg



Later, while having lunch on a little island, we saw her sail out.
http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y279/picsonline/NZ%20Feb%202010/m_IMGP6396.jpg


Two years ago while sailing on a friends boat in the Auckland area we went by the Spirit of New Zealand and later learned she had been out to disperse Sir Edmund Hillary’s ashes that day.

J P
03-13-2010, 02:28 AM
Some of the islands we wanted to hop on the end leg of "Plan A".

http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y279/picsonline/NZ%20Feb%202010/m_SANY0215.jpg