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elf
03-07-2010, 10:12 AM
http://andrewsullivan.theatlantic.com/the_daily_dish/2010/03/map-of-the-day-1.html

From Flowing Data:

FloatingSheep, a fun geography blog, looks at the beer belly of America. One map shows total number of bars, but the interesting map is the one below. Red dots represent locations where there are more bars than grocery stores, based on results from the Google Maps API. The Midwest takes their drinking seriously.

http://andrewsullivan.theatlantic.com/.a/6a00d83451c45669e20120a8f7944b970b-550wi

Bruce Hooke
03-07-2010, 10:42 AM
Interesting. I wonder if some of this is about state regulations. For example, note the sharp demarcation between North and South Dakota.

Interesting too that some cities are the exception one way in their region while others are the exception the other way. For example, Chicago has a lower bar ratio than areas nearby in three directions, whereas metro Boston and Bangor have a higher bar ratio than most nearby areas.

Of course we need to remember that half the equation here is the density of grocery stores, and the density of grocery stores may be influenced by a variety of factors relatively unrelated to bars.

Nicholas Scheuer
03-07-2010, 10:51 AM
Superior WI (across the harbor from Duluth) is supposed to have the highest number of bars per capita.

A lot of the bars date back to WW2 when the population was three times large and most of the people were welding Liberty Ships together.

Moby Nick

Bill Griffin
03-07-2010, 10:52 AM
:EEK:
According to that map there are no bars in Canada?!

Bill Griffin
03-07-2010, 10:52 AM
Ok, having trouble with the smilies, dang it.

delecta
03-07-2010, 10:59 AM
:EEK:
According to that map there are no bars in Canada?!

Wow, Canada blows :D

But I've been to Montreal so you have no worries there. :)

rbgarr
03-07-2010, 12:41 PM
In Canada the bars are in grocery stores... and it's a great idea.
;)

Todd Bradshaw
03-07-2010, 01:26 PM
Not really surprising here. Our grocery stores these days are nearly all big chains with big stores. On the other hand, there are still a lot of small neighborhood bars and there's a very powerful organization that protects them from legislation. For example, you can't buy booze from a store after 9:00 PM. If you want a drink, you have to go to a bar. Gee, I wonder why we seem to have so many drunk drivers who are working on their tenth or twelfth conviction? As an elected official, if you propose a 1/2 cent tax increase on the price of a beer (maybe for a good cause like fixing the roads or bailing out the schools) you're likely to be working at Ace Hardware next year.

Iceboy
03-08-2010, 09:46 AM
Yep, we like our beer here. Who wants to drink at home all the time. That's where you go when you want to eat:)

Tom Montgomery
03-08-2010, 09:56 AM
Fayette County/Lexington is red, but Jefferson County/Louisville is not? That is very hard to believe. It makes me doubt the accuracy of the info.

switters
03-08-2010, 10:05 AM
The little red dot north of Denver must be LaPorte.:D

Phillip Allen
03-08-2010, 10:06 AM
I can see Talaquah, OK...it's a red dot close to the Arkansas line

What do you injuns gota say fer yersefs, Chuck? :)

oznabrag
03-08-2010, 10:36 AM
Fayette County/Lexington is red, but Jefferson County/Louisville is not? That is very hard to believe. It makes me doubt the accuracy of the info.

I see a red dot at Athens, GA, and that makes sense, but I do not see a red dot at Austin, Texas, and that makes me doubt the chart, myself!

Bruce Hooke
03-08-2010, 10:45 AM
To the doubters...remember that the number of bars is only half the equation...the other half is the number of grocery stores, which can vary quite a bit based on factors totally unrelated to bars...

Iceboy
03-08-2010, 11:07 AM
This points out a problem with the rest of the country. An alarming shortage of bars!! Write your local zoning authority and demand equal representation! Beer parity for all:)