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View Full Version : Kid on 5 radio transmissions at JFK !



Nicholas Scheuer
03-03-2010, 04:24 PM
A Controller took his kid to work and let him direct aircraft!!

Good thing he didn't take his dog!

"735 ready for takeoff"

"ARF"

"Repeat, 735 ready for takeoff".

"ARF, ARF!"

"Is this place going to the dogs, or what?"

rbgarr
03-03-2010, 05:14 PM
I heard the tape of the controller, his boy and the pilots. They were all doing fine with it. I hope the boy won't feel guilty about his dad being put on probation/whatever.

Nicholas Scheuer
03-03-2010, 05:25 PM
Everybody working in the tower was relieved, and they all deserve it. Someone HAD to realize the dad was using bad jusgement, but failed to prevent it.

Moby Nick

willmarsh3
03-03-2010, 05:53 PM
I got to talk on the radio (commercial broadcast) as a kid once but this is a wee bit more critical.

bobbys
03-03-2010, 06:26 PM
I think there's some 8 year olds replying here:D

paladin
03-03-2010, 09:03 PM
I may be wrong but he coulda had his ticket pulled over that one.....

McMike
03-03-2010, 09:15 PM
Think he's gonna get fired according to the tone of the report I heard on NPR. I think he should, it's one of those jobs that kids just don't have any place being near.

BrianW
03-04-2010, 12:21 AM
I heard the tapes too.

Sounded fine. Kid was good, dad obviously there telling him what to say, and intervening as needed, pilots seemed to enjoy it.

Unless there was a problem, I don't see the problem.

David Tabor (sailordave)
03-04-2010, 06:44 AM
Well I guess I have a unique perspective on this.

Should he have done this? No. Was safety compromised? No.
Traffic was slow and the kid was just parroting what his Dad told him. He was NOT working on his own or making stuff up.

Do I want my doctor's kid taking my appendix out? No, but I also wouldn't have a problem w/ the kid being present to observe and being allowed to cut the thread his Dad just stitched me up w/ which is a pretty close analogy.

Or as one supervisor said.... "should he have done it... No. But I gave my first clearance at THIRTEEN when I went to work the mid shift w/ MY Dad."

As a matter of fact I would bet a sizable sum that most second generation controllers went to work w/ their fathers and probably did the same damn thing at some point.
I know for fact that one guy regularly went to work w/ his Dad on the midshift and talked to planes at 15-16, hired @ 20 or 21.

Sad thing is the FAA will overeact to this as the media is doing.

Move along here, nothing to see.

Nicholas Scheuer
03-04-2010, 07:46 AM
Why not let the Surgeon's kid take a little slice on you, dave? The Surgeon would be holding his or her hand.

Moby Nick

BrianW
03-04-2010, 11:01 AM
Why not let the Surgeon's kid take a little slice on you, dave? The Surgeon would be holding his or her hand.

Moby Nick

Maybe because it's easy enough to "belay my last" on the radio, as compared to slicing skin?

That were tough.

stoneyreef
03-04-2010, 12:07 PM
I think this is all blown out of proportion as well, the kid was sitting next to his Dad and Dad was telling him what to say. Not like he left him there after 5 minutes of instruction and went for coffee.

huisjen
03-04-2010, 12:24 PM
This is probably a bigger deal:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/8549954.stm

Dan

Mrleft8
03-04-2010, 12:26 PM
Hysteria.... I could clearly hear the father clearing the aircraft, and the kid justechoed it. The pilot sure seemed amused, and fine with it..... I don't know what tower guys make, but I'll bet it's a lot more than the pilots flying the commuter jets and Dash 8s.... Hell, even wide body pilots barely make more than McDonald's managers until they've got decades of seniority.....Give em a chuckle once in a while....

hokiefan
03-04-2010, 12:27 PM
This is probably a bigger deal:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/8549954.stm

Dan

A master of understatement!!!

S/V Laura Ellen
03-04-2010, 12:37 PM
This is probably a bigger deal:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/8549954.stm

Dan


Turkey's Corendon Airlines said he had been flying for the airline for two years and had "expertly misled the company with his false papers".

I'm looking for work, maybe I should send a slightly altered resume to Corendon Airlines. Doesn't sound like they do much in the way of background checks.

Mrleft8
03-04-2010, 12:41 PM
Sounds like a Leonardo DiCaprio movie..... What could they call it...... "Catch me if you can".....? :D

John of Phoenix
03-04-2010, 01:05 PM
Guy is getting on a 747 and the Captain is greeting the passengers as they board.

Capt: Hello sir, welcome aboard.
Pax: Hi there. I'm a pilot too. Look, here's my license.
Capt: Oh, yes. Let's see... Single engine land. Well, congratulations. I can see you’re very proud of it.
Pax: Yes I am. If you need any help I'll be sitting in 21D.
Capt: Oh... well... ok... if we lose three engines I'll... be in touch.

CharlieCobra
03-04-2010, 01:53 PM
This is probably a bigger deal:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/8549954.stm

Dan


Considering he flew for them for TWO YEARS, he might've had a clue on how to do it....

chas
03-04-2010, 03:31 PM
During the mid-60’s I occasionally had the opportunity to slide into the “left seat “of a DC-4 during transport flights to the air base in Goose Bay, Labrador. Dad always seemed to need a ‘nap’ during these flights, and I was invariably required to takeover for a spell.

I can still remember the gist of my father’s instructions for that first flight, which included my first recognisance of port/starboard.

“This is your compass, our heading is 30NE, try not to stray too far from this. Our altitude is 20,000’. Keep us between 18,000’ and 22,000. Steering is like the car ( I had been doing that since 6 yrs old; at ten I had this down), push the yoke forward for down and pull back for climbing. Do everything slowly. Our flight # is …, put on these headphones and listen for directions. See you in an hour or so. Have fun!”

Even to this day, I can return to that cockpit and the feelings that this evoked. Still remember that co-pilot slipping me a wink as he strapped his belt back on and Dad complaining about being airsick later as I was relieved from my duties for the landing.

If nothing else, I hope that kid has good memories from with his turn at the mike. / Jim

paladin
03-04-2010, 04:06 PM
Chas...I'm glad I got outta the Goose/Cartwright/Cutthroat Island just ahead of you......:D:D

WX
03-04-2010, 05:43 PM
It was on the news here. All the pilots seemed quite happy with the kid.

The Bigfella
03-04-2010, 05:50 PM
Storm in a teacup.

Not quite in the same league, but I've done the landing announcement on a Qantas flight coming into Sydney's Kingsford Smith airport. The sector before, I'd been parroting the hostie who was sitting facing me as she did the announcement ... and she cracked up... so she handed me the mike coming into Sydney.

seafox
03-04-2010, 05:54 PM
the pilots are fine the air traphic controlers are fine. and some beaurocrat is the one freeking out. get rig of 90 percent of govrnment and we would all be better off. btw my mom and dad were a nurse and motorpool maintance boss so not highly sensitive areas but I spent more than a few days on the base.

seafox
03-04-2010, 05:56 PM
the dad and his boss should be quietly sent back to work no punishment and the who thing forgetten.

Stan D
03-04-2010, 05:56 PM
I don't know how many of you all actually listen to this stuff, but I occasionally do. And I have heard way less professionalism from some controllers than I heard from that kid.

McMike
03-04-2010, 05:57 PM
IMO, it would have one thing if this had taken place at a small municipal airport but we're talking a world class airport where it's never "not busy". I think a zero tolerance approach is the only way to handle this. I know you guys are gonna think I'm a hard ass but I don't think there's much room for error in that particular job at that particular level.