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S.V. Airlie
03-02-2010, 02:11 PM
recalling a million plus due to possible faulty power steering...
Hey what can one say here. If it isn't one company, there will be another.
Heck, these mechanical problems in the auto industry will keep the federal gov. busy and off track. Healthcare.. who cares...stimulus, who cares, jobs, who cares.. we gotta fix the auto industry problems... and we own a good bit of one of them...:rolleyes:

Michael D. Storey
03-02-2010, 02:15 PM
How many other industries make high-speed, complex, consumer articles that don't bother to recall 'em when they have made a mistake?

S.V. Airlie
03-02-2010, 02:17 PM
How many other industries make high-speed, complex, consumer articles that don't bother to recall 'em when they have made a mistake?


Well as I wrote, the more that reach the surface, the more our federal gov. will be wrapped up. A good excuse to do nothing..

Keith Wilson
03-02-2010, 02:55 PM
This has little or nothing to do with the feds, or politics. Somebody with GM engineering or manufacturing screwed up; now they're fixing it. Nothing new.

Michael D. Storey
03-02-2010, 03:09 PM
This has little or nothing to do with the feds, or politics. Somebody with GM enigneering or manufacturing screwed up; now they're fixing it. Nothing new.

Not new; just the way it should be

paladin
03-02-2010, 04:04 PM
I wonder if all the nasty remarks that they made about Toyota is coming home to roost, especially now since "The Government" owns part of GM.

Nicholas Scheuer
03-02-2010, 05:27 PM
GM has been down this road before, many times. It won't result in the Chairman of GM appearing at a Congressional Hearing.

Moby Nick

Nicholas Scheuer
03-02-2010, 05:43 PM
Exactly!

Keith Wilson
03-02-2010, 05:46 PM
The reason it will not result in Congressional hearings is that GM hasn't hidden this problem for a decade! The earliest Toyota vehicle involved in the recall is from 2005.

peter radclyffe
03-02-2010, 06:25 PM
steering problems, you couldn't make it up, is there a better example for car companies who have lost their sense of direction

Nicholas Scheuer
03-02-2010, 06:31 PM
Maybe we're steering "by wire", too, peter.

Let's go back to some mechanical iron connecting the driver to the car.

Moby Nick

StevenBauer
03-02-2010, 06:39 PM
Top 3 recalls of all time: Ford, Ford, GM


#1 Ford 2008 (12 million vehicles)
In February of 2008, Ford issued the industry’s largest-ever recall, affecting Lincoln and Mercury SUVs, pickups, cars, and vans of model years ‘93 to ‘04. The lowly cruise-control switch was behind this mother-of-all do-overs. It had a nasty habit of catching fire, sometimes hours after the vehicle had been parked and turned off. Owner response, however, has been slow, so in a rare move Ford reissued the recall in September of 2008 for the 5 million vehicleshttp://images.intellitxt.com/ast/adTypes/2_bing.gif (http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/total-recall-ten-largest-auto-recalls-of-all-time/2008_ford_escape_ext_1/#) still unrepaired.



#2. Ford 1996 (8.6 million vehicles):In 1996, after customers complained of fires caused by faulty ignition systems, Ford Motor Co. recalled vehicles including 1998-’93 Escorts, Mustangs, Tempos, Thunderbirds, Cougars, Crown Vics, Grand Marquis, Lincoln Town Cars, Aerostars, Broncos, and F-series trucks.

#3. GM 1971 (6.7 million vehicles): In 1971, some GM customers got the ride of their lives as engine mounts began separating from frames and falling back onto throttles. The models with these rocket-like tendencies included Belair, Brookwood, Camaro, Caprice, Chevrolet, Chevy II, G Series, Impala, Kingswood, Nova, P Series, C Series, and Townsmen.

I don't think this list is current, but I don't think the Toyota recalls match any of these.


Steven

Dan McCosh
03-02-2010, 08:27 PM
The Toyota issue is not about a recall, or even a safety-related issue. it is about a safety problem that may have been covered up, rather than initiating a recall. There are hundreds of recalls annually.

peter radclyffe
03-03-2010, 12:29 AM
Maybe we're steering "by wire", too, peter.

Let's go back to some mechanical iron connecting the driver to the car.

Moby Nick
yep were all lost at seahttp://www.woodenboat.com/forum/images/icons/icon7.gif

High C
03-03-2010, 12:42 AM
Maybe we're steering "by wire", too, peter.

Let's go back to some mechanical iron connecting the driver to the car.

Moby Nick

The iron is still there. There are no street legal "drive by wire cars" in the US. The electrical steering systems provide boost, similar to the older hydraulic power steering systems, but the actual steering is still done with conventional linkage.

Dan McCosh
03-03-2010, 06:26 AM
The iron is still there. There are no street legal "drive by wire cars" in the US. The electrical steering systems provide boost, similar to the older hydraulic power steering systems, but the actual steering is still done with conventional linkage.

There are no all-electric steering systems on production cars, but there are several with active electric input systems that can provide steering independent of the steering wheel. There are also systems that both apply and release the brakes, activate the shifts of the transmission, and control the throttle independent from the gas pedal position. The latter systems are on most cars produced today. All are controlled by computer systems, which are responding to a combination of sensors and the driver's direct input.

John Smith
03-03-2010, 07:22 AM
The iron is still there. There are no street legal "drive by wire cars" in the US. The electrical steering systems provide boost, similar to the older hydraulic power steering systems, but the actual steering is still done with conventional linkage.

My daughter's cooworker stopped in to visit the other night. He had a Camry which he loved. Got into a little fender bender, and he decided to buy a new one. He HATES the "by wire" accelerator"

When he complained, they told him, "That's the one we use on the Lexus."

JimJ
03-03-2010, 08:00 AM
Sounds like the fly-by-wire in the aviation industry. At least aircraft have 3 computers to make a decision. All that means that you have three times the chance of a failure.

Back in my billy cart days, we had a piece of string for steering, a steep hill for acceleration and a wooden lever for brakes. Cannot remember a failure in these systems.

People drive too fast for the conditions so we have to have stability control systems that apply the brakes or apply power to keep the car upright, drive too close to the car in front so we have radar to apply the brakes, cannot reverse park so we have a computer to do that.

StevenBauer
03-04-2010, 11:31 PM
Keep buying Toyotas and shopping at Walmart, steven bauer ...

Of course, a person of your 'stature' :rolleyes: doesn't realize that Ford and GM got in front of their problems ...


I KNOW you do not like me, stevenbauer ... but please don't let that fact blind you into being a complete idiot when it comes to recalls and knowledge, thereof!



You're losing it Brad. I don't shop at Walmart and I drive a Ford.
Stature? Why are you talking about stature? If you mean not using disgusting demeaning language when talking about a fellow forumite's wife I guess you're on to something, though.




we all KNOW you thought I was being a blow-hard IDIOT that disgusted you personally, and many others here?



Truer words...



Steven

StevenBauer
03-05-2010, 12:49 AM
When will you admit you are wrong about toyota ...



When have I ever said anything about Toyota? WTF? You are losing it. Seek help.



Steven