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58Connie
02-26-2010, 01:26 PM
Hello everyone! I wanted to introduce my project...She is a 1958 35' Connie that we aquired out of New Hampshire....Im still wondering what went wrong in our heads to tackle these old wooden projects!
Here she is being delivered:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v200/gadowguitars/connie1.jpg

Here she is about a month in..I'vw got the hull stripped and the lower Transom board removed for replacement....Ive also stripped everything off the boat that I can get in our multiple trips to take back to my shop for re varnishing....Im lucky enough to have a full woodworking facility (I own a guitar building company).
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v200/gadowguitars/conniestripped.jpg

58Connie
02-26-2010, 01:28 PM
Im currently milling up Douglas fir to replace the aft deck..and I have all the hatches in the shop being rebuilt...my wife wants those pretty shiny decks so im having lots of fun varnishing!

If anyone owns one of these please let me know...as I know im going to have alot of questions!

mucrewbtp
02-26-2010, 06:39 PM
You may want to contact the mariners museum and get a couple original drawings for the boat. That would help you make sure you maintain or maybe restore the original shape of the boat. From the above pictures it appears that the boat may have developed a hog due to improper storage. Comparing measurements you take from your boat to offsets from the original drawings would tell you this. Do you have any experience restoring wood boats before? Beware of the beginners mistake of jumping right to the refinishing work first. You should really strip out the boat and begin inspecting all of the structure and framework first. You dont want to finish a full varnish and paint job only to figure out you have rotted chines and have to replace the stem/knee. You should really get a survey by someone who is experienced with wood boats. This would tell you what kind of condition the structure is in and would give you a good start at planning out the project.

Regards,
Mike

58Connie
02-26-2010, 11:17 PM
You may want to contact the mariners museum and get a couple original drawings for the boat. That would help you make sure you maintain or maybe restore the original shape of the boat. From the above pictures it appears that the boat may have developed a hog due to improper storage. Comparing measurements you take from your boat to offsets from the original drawings would tell you this. Do you have any experience restoring wood boats before? Beware of the beginners mistake of jumping right to the refinishing work first. You should really strip out the boat and begin inspecting all of the structure and framework first. You dont want to finish a full varnish and paint job only to figure out you have rotted chines and have to replace the stem/knee. You should really get a survey by someone who is experienced with wood boats. This would tell you what kind of condition the structure is in and would give you a good start at planning out the project.

Regards,
Mike

Thanx for the info...We have already gotten the survey and plans from the Mariners museum....The boat appears to have a hog because of the crappy wide angle lens distorting the image.

chuckt
02-27-2010, 07:41 AM
Hey Mike! I just got a 30' CC Express from New Hampshire and have started restoration. I haven't started a thread yet. Sounds like you are mostly preserving your bottom. I'm completely redoing mine--a decision which I regreted halfway though bottom removal but I'm committed now. I came real close to buying the very model you have from a guy in MIchigan. I love the Connies in this size! Congrats! I backed off because that one needed new engines, wiring and all other sysytems. The one I bought has all that and "only" needs the bottom restored. Good luck . Ditto the above comment. Do a careful look for rot in your floor timbers, up near the stem and around your thru hulls, where the prop and rudders pass through the hull, and in the lowest part of the bilge. I found it in all those places. Also carefully check all your frames. I found some cracked. Check you garboards carefully and think about replacing them or even the next planks up too. You may also want to do a sampling of your bottom screws. Maybe remove 50 and see how many have lost their "bite" into the frames. If a significant number aren't holding well in the frames, I would be worried about seaworthiness. I'll be following your thread with great interest.

chuckt
02-27-2010, 07:47 AM
Hey Mike--Let us know where you are. Are you planking your aft deck with fir? It will look nice but the prior owenr of mine planked my aft deck and it does make it dificult to access the workings down there. Had he not done this, I could have just removed the plywood for easy access. However, it does look good and I'll work around it

nextse7en
02-27-2010, 10:43 AM
Hi there,

You may want to peek at my restoration thread. Mine is a 45' DCFB, but the hull characteristics are the same.
http://woodenboat.com/forum/showthread.php?t=100563

You've certainly got your work cut out for you, welcome to (or back to) the madhouse.

SunshineBridge
02-27-2010, 06:13 PM
Welcome to where the mad people hang out. A lovely boat you've got there.

The hog referred to is along the transom imediately above where you have her blocked up. I think that line should be straight.

I recommend you have many more supports under the boat. There should be a set under every frame both sides. Wedge each one and ensure even support from each. Also the keel should be resting on railway sleepers (or similar) lengthways all along its length rather than across it.

I would also definitely suggest that you strip as much of the interior as required to examine the chines, frames and stringers. Ensure she keeps dry inside with no rainwater ingress. If the deck you are replacing has been leaking it will have been letting rainwater in. Rainwater rots wood like crazy, unlike seawater.

As an FYI, my planking was tested by the surveyor with a bradall and a good shove. More than 25-30% penetration means a new plank.

The very best of luck with your restoration, I look forward to plenty of photos.

58Connie
02-27-2010, 10:54 PM
Hi there,

You may want to peek at my restoration thread. Mine is a 45' DCFB, but the hull characteristics are the same.
http://woodenboat.com/forum/showthread.php?t=100563

You've certainly got your work cut out for you, welcome to (or back to) the madhouse.

I read your thread a few weeks ago...looked like you had a bunch of fun!

58Connie
02-27-2010, 10:57 PM
Hey Mike! I just got a 30' CC Express from New Hampshire and have started restoration. I haven't started a thread yet. Sounds like you are mostly preserving your bottom. I'm completely redoing mine--a decision which I regreted halfway though bottom removal but I'm committed now. I came real close to buying the very model you have from a guy in MIchigan. I love the Connies in this size! Congrats! I backed off because that one needed new engines, wiring and all other sysytems. The one I bought has all that and "only" needs the bottom restored. Good luck . Ditto the above comment. Do a careful look for rot in your floor timbers, up near the stem and around your thru hulls, where the prop and rudders pass through the hull, and in the lowest part of the bilge. I found it in all those places. Also carefully check all your frames. I found some cracked. Check you garboards carefully and think about replacing them or even the next planks up too. You may also want to do a sampling of your bottom screws. Maybe remove 50 and see how many have lost their "bite" into the frames. If a significant number aren't holding well in the frames, I would be worried about seaworthiness. I'll be following your thread with great interest.

Just for the record my name is Ryan ;) You look like you are going to have a fun project!

Im lucky in the fact that the boat is in really great condition...The only problem spots were the bottom transom...someone did a repair once before...but didn't do a very good job.....and we have about 3 planks that have to be replaced.

58Connie
02-27-2010, 11:01 PM
Welcome to where the mad people hang out. A lovely boat you've got there.

The hog referred to is along the transom imediately above where you have her blocked up. I think that line should be straight.

I recommend you have many more supports under the boat. There should be a set under every frame both sides. Wedge each one and ensure even support from each. Also the keel should be resting on railway sleepers (or similar) lengthways all along its length rather than across it.

I would also definitely suggest that you strip as much of the interior as required to examine the chines, frames and stringers. Ensure she keeps dry inside with no rainwater ingress. If the deck you are replacing has been leaking it will have been letting rainwater in. Rainwater rots wood like crazy, unlike seawater.

As an FYI, my planking was tested by the surveyor with a bradall and a good shove. More than 25-30% penetration means a new plank.

The very best of luck with your restoration, I look forward to plenty of photos.


Thanx for the comments...we added a few screw jacks along the engine stringers to sure her up.

We have pulled alot of the interior out...and we are lucky that she is in great condition....we had a survey done, and I have a boatwright doing the hull....so i'm sure not to mess anything up.:D

C. Ross
02-27-2010, 11:35 PM
Welcome 58Connie.

Lovely boats...I think the 58 and 59 bullnoses are the prettiest cruisers CC ever made. In the second picture, where she's wooded, she looks awfully pretty.

Agreed with SunshineBridge about getting her better blocked. You might want to raise her a bit to make it easier to work on the bottom. She doesn't looked hogged in the top delivery picture. Post more, especially more pictures!

Lew Barrett
02-28-2010, 12:22 AM
Welcome and good luck with a nice project!

That makes three of us in respect to the blocking, by the way. It's funny; you can look at a photo and not see stuff like that until somebody points it out. I didn't even notice it myself.

Of course, working on the topsides is easier if she's lower. But I would not want to be the guy to have to work on her bottom! If she's going to sit there for a bit and isn't supported every couple of feet under the keel, that's not good. Of course, we can't tell from here what kind of support she has under her; maybe you just wanted her really low, but I'd want to have a more adjustable rig all around rather than to create a few "hard" points as seems to be the case from what we can see.

One more thing. If she's going to be there for a few months. you want white tarps, not blue ones. I know. Blue ones are easier to find. The white ones are worth the effort to get.

chuckt
02-28-2010, 08:51 AM
Sorry Ryan. Where did I get "Mike?" I have no idea now

Gluesniffer
02-28-2010, 12:27 PM
I agree with the others posting here: I'd redo the shoring. Looks like weight is being supported at the transom and not enough amidships. Like Lew said, every couple of feet on the keel.

And, as someone else said, I believe that this model Chris was the absolute best looking cruiser they ever built. Just gorgeous.

Let me guess: Twin 175HP Herc's? I think that most of them came with that power package, 'till the 283's showed up sometime in '59, I think.

Was this the boat that was for sale up at Harper's in NH?

58Connie
02-28-2010, 05:45 PM
I agree with the others posting here: I'd redo the shoring. Looks like weight is being supported at the transom and not enough amidships. Like Lew said, every couple of feet on the keel.

And, as someone else said, I believe that this model Chris was the absolute best looking cruiser they ever built. Just gorgeous.

Let me guess: Twin 175HP Herc's? I think that most of them came with that power package, 'till the 283's showed up sometime in '59, I think.

Was this the boat that was for sale up at Harper's in NH?


Yes..she has the 175hp Hercs...and yes I got her from Harper's

58Connie
02-28-2010, 05:47 PM
Welcome and good luck with a nice project!

That makes three of us in respect to the blocking, by the way. It's funny; you can look at a photo and not see stuff like that until somebody points it out. I didn't even notice it myself.

Of course, working on the topsides is easier if she's lower. But I would not want to be the guy to have to work on her bottom! If she's going to sit there for a bit and isn't supported every couple of feet under the keel, that's not good. Of course, we can't tell from here what kind of support she has under her; maybe you just wanted her really low, but I'd want to have a more adjustable rig all around rather than to create a few "hard" points as seems to be the case from what we can see.

One more thing. If she's going to be there for a few months. you want white tarps, not blue ones. I know. Blue ones are easier to find. The white ones are worth the effort to get.

We have blocked her much better since the photos....and the blue tarps have already been shredded to pieces...I guess im off to get some white ones!:D

Shes blocked low so I can get the topsides done...and I have some wood to replace around cap rails.

Lew Barrett
02-28-2010, 07:14 PM
Good deal. The reason for getting white tarps is that, rather counter-intuitively,
the blue ones will pass a lot of UV, which makes it harder to stay ahead of deterioration that's inevitable as the weather does it's work.

I take no credit for noting the blocking situation; thank Cris and Graham of Sunshine Bridge. I just saw their comments and piled on like any good Rugby player would!

C. Ross
02-28-2010, 07:27 PM
...the blue ones will pass a lot of UV...

Good point. Up here, the issue is also freeze/thaw under the blue tarp about this time of year. I had no real choice this winter except blue tarp (with lots and lots of vents!).

58Connie
02-28-2010, 08:51 PM
Well today I started rebuilding my cap rails ...the old wood had shrunk so bad they couldn't be sanded.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v200/gadowguitars/0228002009.jpg

Im also replacing all of the aft deck...I started with the hatches because I could take them to my shop and work on them in some resemblence of warmth....this one has a few more caots to go...Ive been doing one with Epiphanes and one with the Valspar Cabot to see which one ill use.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v200/gadowguitars/0228002009b.jpg

58Connie
04-22-2010, 08:28 PM
So lots of work has been going on with our girl...fairing the hull preparing for a total repaint....refinishing all of the interior parts that can be removed....Im getting ready to start replacing the aft (Dug fir) and forward deck (mahogany)...and we are preparing to pull the engines.

...but today was exciting, as I actually got to put something on instead of taking off!!!!! replacing the covering boards around the deck.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v200/gadowguitars/aftcap0.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v200/gadowguitars/aftcap2.jpg

chuckt
04-22-2010, 08:33 PM
Very cool. It is fun to finally get to constructing something.