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footstepfollower
02-25-2010, 07:00 AM
I am looking for a relatively inexpensive and quick first sailboat to build. A 100 lb or less hull with room for two on occasion, but usually just myself. Something like the weekend skiff or the whisp I've seen mentioned here. Any other recommendations?

I do have some woodworking experience and basic tools... I have not sailed yet though. I would also like to be able to row the boat reasonably well and fish from it.

DGentry
02-25-2010, 07:28 AM
That's a question that gets asked a lot, so be sure to search some of those threads for other answers, too.

But, for a first sailboat, I say your best option is plywood, and a flat bottomed, hard chine design will be easiest, cheapest and quickest to get you on the water. Some may not be pretty, but they all work - to a lesser or greater extent. And, most will row acceptably, though not spectacularly.

I'll continue to recommend what I always do: Get a book or two by Harold Payson and/or Jim Michalak. They are very inexpensive, they have lots of excellent information about building simple plywood boats, and they each include several plans for said boats.

Bolger boats, from Payson: Teal (pretty small), Surf, Elegant Punt, Brick or Gypsy. Gypsy is the best of them, but also a more complex build. Surf is the one I'd choose, of these, though, for ease of construction, amusing sailing and (relatively) good rowing performance.
www.instantboats.com (http://www.instantboats.com)

Michalak boats: Mayfly 14, Piccup Squared, Ladybug
http://www.duckworksbbs.com/plans/jim/michalak.htm

Gavin Atkins has some free designs, and a book. http://www.duckworksbbs.com/plans/gavin/index.htm

And, of course, there's nothing wrong with the beautiful Whisp, except that it is primarily a rowing craft. I know nothing about the Weekend Skiff. Err, except that I may have built much of one . . . if so, it went together very easily!

And there are so many others! Summer Breeze, and Puddle Duck Racers often are recommended as well.
Check out a large plans list, here, too:
http://www.duckworksmagazine.com/r/plansindex.htm

Choosing the right boat is half the fun!
How's your kayak coming along?

Dave Gentry

footstepfollower
02-25-2010, 08:33 AM
Dave,

Have not started my kayak. I have plans for two. I did buy Michalak's book and Payson's New Instant Boats. I thought JM's piccup was my boat but I have gotten build time estimates that nixed it for now. I am done with coursework in mid May and have a few hours a week until July 30 to finish a project. I am searching here buy any search that includes build, skiff, easy, cheap etc. Brings back 11 plus pages of threads.

I specifically need a fast build. I was thinking, like you, plywood single chine. I specifically like the "weekend skiff" idea. Anyone here build one? I was wondering how fast Whisp would be to build.

I also am looking for any other recommendation that could be built in 10 weeks of spare time, sail 2 on occasion, and fit on top of an sub until I get a trailer. I have time for only one build and can borrow a kayak. Two week vacation right on the beach, I need a sailboat...


That's a question that gets asked a lot, so be sure to search some of those threads for other answers, too.

But, for a first sailboat, I say your best option is plywood, and a flat bottomed, hard chine design will be easiest, cheapest and quickest to get you on the water. Some may not be pretty, but they all work - to a lesser or greater extent. And, most will row acceptably, though not spectacularly.

I'll continue to recommend what I always do: Get a book or two by Harold Payson and/or Jim Michalak. They are very inexpensive, they have lots of excellent information about building simple plywood boats, and they each include several plans for said boats.

Bolger boats, from Payson: Teal (pretty small), Surf, Elegant Punt, Brick or Gypsy. Gypsy is the best of them, but also a more complex build. Surf is the one I'd choose, of these, though, for ease of construction, amusing sailing and (relatively) good rowing performance.
www.instantboats.com (http://www.instantboats.com)

Michalak boats: Mayfly 14, Piccup Squared, Ladybug
http://www.duckworksbbs.com/plans/jim/michalak.htm

Gavin Atkins has some free designs, and a book. http://www.duckworksbbs.com/plans/gavin/index.htm

And, of course, there's nothing wrong with the beautiful Whisp, except that it is primarily a rowing craft. I know nothing about the Weekend Skiff. Err, except that I may have built much of one . . . if so, it went together very easily!

And there are so many others! Summer Breeze, and Puddle Duck Racers often are recommended as well.
Check out a large plans list, here, too:
http://www.duckworksmagazine.com/r/plansindex.htm

Choosing the right boat is half the fun!
How's your kayak coming along?

Dave Gentry

Stashu
02-25-2010, 08:40 AM
You might take a look at Glen-L's 8 Ball. No wasted time or effort as I recall.

Lewisboats
02-25-2010, 08:41 AM
David Beede's Summer Breeze

http://www.simplicityboats.com/summerbreeze.html

kenjamin
02-25-2010, 09:01 AM
My favorite "quickie" build:

Ross Lillistone's Flint

http://ford.physics.fsu.edu/FlintCartop1.jpg

http://ford.physics.fsu.edu/FlintMotor.jpg

http://ford.physics.fsu.edu/FlintRow.jpg

http://ford.physics.fsu.edu/FlintSail.jpg

BrianY
02-25-2010, 09:19 AM
Karl Stambaugh's Bay Skiff 12 ?
http://www.cmdboats.com/bayskiff.htm?cart_id=a4288a967d1687d6154e14685f70e 305

DGentry
02-25-2010, 09:56 AM
I specifically need a fast build. I was thinking, like you, plywood single chine. I specifically like the "weekend skiff" idea. Anyone here build one? I was wondering how fast Whisp would be to build.



Well, James McMullen built a Bolger Teal in about 6 hours, minus the sailing bits. Your results may vary!
It's a simple and fast build, in any case - just two sheets of plywood, sails OK, rows OK, cartops easier than most of the others, and is not too crowded with two (as long as the second is a kid or a sprightly girl you want to cozy up with). Plans and building guide available in Payson's book "Instant Boats," or direct from Payson himself: http://www.instantboats.com/teal.htm
http://www.instantboats.com/images/tealprof2.gif
Bolger's Surf is a bigger, more capable version.

Whisp would be a slower, more complex build, with it's 3 strake sides. Looks good, though. Read some reviews on the forum . . . .

Can't help you with the Weekend Skiff - I think it was something else we put together.

A lot of these simple skiffs can be put together pretty quickly and most of them will perform about equally well. And, building time, really, is often up to the builder. Some people take months or years to build a dinghy (many will never finish), and some will blow through one in a week.
Of course a simpler hull shape and construction method is going to be inherently faster to make. There are lots of choices and compromises.

Good luck!
Dave Gentry

David G
02-25-2010, 10:55 AM
I agree that flat-bottomed, hard-chined plywood boats are gonna be your best best.

Most of the boats mentioned so far will not be under 100#. I'm thinking that would include both the weekend skiff and the whisp. Are you planning on car-topping, and thus the weight restriction? If you stick by that restriction, it limits the field considerably. If so - I would suggest that you look at the Puddle Duck Racer. Goofy looking things, but smart sailors - fast, responsive, and stable. They're quite easy and inexpensive to build, and a great First Boat. Best with one person, but can carry two (or even three in a pinch).

http://www.storerboatplans.com/Pdr/pdr.html

http://www.pdracer.com/

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3268/2806921082_bfb27b6b4d_o.jpg



If you're willing to relax the weight restrictions, and will consider such boats as the Flint, Summer Breeze, et.al. then you might also look at what I think may just be the Most Boat for the Least Time/Money out there - the Goat Island Skiff by Michael Storer:

http://homepage.mac.com/peterhyndman/GIS/

http://www.storerboatplans.com/GIS/GISplan.html

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3540/3422264316_2551697321.jpg

Breakaway
02-25-2010, 10:58 AM
I bought Whisp plans with the idea of building one as my first boat. It is a very pretty boat, fine-lined, and quite the performer according to all the accounts of it I've heard about here on the WBF.

I changed my mind though, and decided to build a Summer Breeze first, instead. The reason? I wanted to get a boat under my belt so I could then do better justice to a design like Whisp. While both boats basic hull go together in about the same time, I , personally, would want to put more effort into fitting out and finishing a WHISP, while for Summerbreze, its a real simple interior and I wont fell guilty about a workboat finish.

While I started my Summer Breeze last March, I only have 46 hours into the build. And I'm close to completion (need some warm weather to glue and paint). You can see my build HERE. (http://boatsandboatinggear.blogspot.com/)Use the search feature at the bottom of the blog and enter "Build a Dinghy." There are about 20 sequential entries showing progress.

Summer Breeze plans HERE. (http://simplicityboats.com/summerbreeze.html)



Good Luck

Woxbox
02-25-2010, 07:43 PM
Another voter for Instant Boats. Teal for one person, Surf for two. You can easily make the ends of Surf watertight so it can't sink. Either one will go together very quickly and as cheaply as a boat can be built. Don't get fancy, just slap one together and have some fun with it.

James McMullen
02-25-2010, 08:44 PM
I was going to mention the Bolger Teal, but I see Dave beat me to it. I don't think there is a better sailboat that you can build in less time for less money--though there are certainly better sailboats you can build in a lotmore time for an awful lot more money. . . . . . . .

Still, the Teal--two sheets of 1/4" cdx, a few 2x4's, a pneumatic stapler and a tube of PL Premium and you'll be on the water in less than a week unless you make the mistake of trying to fancy her up.

Then again, I also built a Whisp, and that's a better boat in every single way other than how cheap and quick and easy it is to build. You pays yer money and you takes yer chances.

fellswoop76
02-25-2010, 09:50 PM
I vote teal as well.

footstepfollower
02-25-2010, 10:25 PM
Stashu, the eight ball looks simple and the weight is right, but it is too small capacity wise and has the flat transom bow I want to avoid as I will sail in the Gulf often.

Summer Breeze looks awesome and I thank you guys for the recommendation. It is on the short list.

Ross Lillistone's Flint looks amazing, but the weight is listed at 125 built with Okume ply and I will likely use AC exterior which weighs more. The bow is perfect for my intended use but will increase complexity and build time.

The Bay Skiff 12 likewise weighs 125, but looks great. Looks like a daggerboard? I really want a kick-up rudder and leeboard since the water is thin in the Gulf here. I forgot to mention those two points in my design quest. A centerboard will increase weight and complexity, likewise a daggerboard with it's sudden stops on underwater obstacles!

Months ago I drooled over Storer's GIS, but think I would be prone to try to overbuild. I think it would kill my desire to go quick and cheap. Sorry, but I just can't get past the looks of the PDR, despite reading the accolades and understanding its virtues.

Kevin, thanks for sharing the whisp/summer breeze story. Did you really say you built summer breeze to "get a boat under your belt" so you could "do justice" to whisp??? From the look of you blog that is one platinum plated breeze coming our way. Beautiful, and inspiring.

Teal looks quite easy to build, but I'm a big dude. Like 6'4" 250 lbs. big. It may handle me but not much else. I am adding Surf to my list though. Doable!

So far summer breeze, surf, the weekend skiff and whisp are on my short list and meet my needs for weight and design use. I like the idea of the flatiron skiff idea, the historicity of it, and the idea of a glue and nail boat appeals to me for a first build. I see some have closed the ends in for flotation, and someone recommended that for surf. I could see how time is going before making that decision. On to research these three choices... I believ

Woxbox
02-25-2010, 11:29 PM
Given your size, I can say you'd be a lot more comfortable in a bigger boat than Teal. I have a Whisp myself, and while almost 16 feet long it is the most tender skiff I've ever rowed or sailed. Surf is just 3'7" wide by 15 1/2 feet long, about the same as Whisp. Teal is just an inch narrower, but 3 1/2 feet shorter. You would feel that.

Here's how Surf is laid out. This is from Payson's Instant Boats. He likes Surf best of the bunch.

http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f92/Woxbox/Surf.jpg

slusher_ben
02-25-2010, 11:34 PM
Don't forget the "Getting started in Boats" series from WB.

kenjamin
02-26-2010, 09:31 AM
footstepfollower,

Ross Lillistone's Flint is a "stitch & glue" constructed boat where the designer gives you the exact shapes of the panels, you cut them out, stitch them together with copper wire, bang on the stitched together boat with a rubber mallet to get it symmetrical and then slap some glue on it to solidify the thing. This kind of boat building really is pretty simple and designed for the first-time boat builder. If you like the shape of the Flint, you should buy some decent 6mm marine ply, some epoxy and go for it, dude. A light responsive boat is so much more of a pleasure to use than a heavy slug of a boat. Check out the build sequence of the Flint here:

Just click on "Flint Photos" on the left column

http://www.baysidewoodenboats.com.au/

fellswoop76
02-26-2010, 10:49 AM
I asked Payson that question with pretty much the same parameters, we came to Teal. Except- it was for me (250#) and my 10 year old son. Two adults may be tough except on dead flat water

davebrown
02-26-2010, 12:41 PM
hull nos. 1 and 2 for me were bolger gypsys (how do you spell the plural of that?); then i built a weekend skiff, then a whisp. for a first build, i think the weekend skiff is pleasurable and absolutely fool-proof. it might be surpassed in beauty by a culler good little skiff or maybe the windward 15, but it still looks like a good jaunty skiff should. i did not sail my weekend skiff, but row only. i sailed one of the two gypsys, and the other made it to paint, but then my brother gave it away...long story. the gypsy is a delightful allrounder. the whisp, which is the last skiff i built, is very tender. i know that ben fuller sails his--he is a better sailor than me. i really like it for an evening workout rowboat but sailing seems prohibitive. because of the wonderful, detailed booklet that goes with the weekend skiff, and because i like the lines on the flint, i would say build either the weekend skiff or the flint. i don't know why more of those weekend skiffs aren't built. the plans (book) are just foolproof. even i built one!

davebrown
02-26-2010, 12:44 PM
ps, i logged 62 trips, most local but a few on a trailer as far as oregon and san luis obispo, in my weekend skiff and then gave it to a senior citizen down the road. i occasionally see it out in his yard on sawhorses, with fresh paint here and there.

switters
02-26-2010, 03:46 PM
Something to think about, if you are going to build another boat later, the first one you build should be a model of the next larger one. If you, like me dream of a GIS, then a summer breeze or teal is a nice intro, bay skiff is going to be pretty heavy in comparison.

Dave Carnell
02-26-2010, 04:30 PM
I modified Phil Bolger's FEATHERWIND with a single leeboard and took out used a box to sit on while rowing. A SUNFISH rig drops into this boat and gives outstanding sailing and rowing performance. I have sailed it with four adults sitting on the bottom on cushions. I cartopped it singlehanded, too. Sold 600 sets of plans around the world, literally.
I sold the business to Thom Vetromile at <smallboatforum.com>.
You cannot build a simpler boat with such outstanding performance.
I paid royalties to Bolger for using his name with the design.
Take a look at it.

footstepfollower
02-26-2010, 08:18 PM
Flint is gorgeous. The more I look at her the more I like her. Likely more versatile for me than Whisp. Too complex a build timewise to fit my schedule this summer though. That boat does grow on you though!

Cedric Rhyn
02-26-2010, 10:39 PM
If you're going to do a PuddleDuck Racer this is the one -
http://www.duckworksbbs.com/plans/jw/kiwipd/index.htm

I hear that the build time is about half the other one, and while no PD Racer is pretty, at least this ones cute.

Cedric



I agree that flat-bottomed, hard-chined plywood boats are gonna be your best best.

Most of the boats mentioned so far will not be under 100#. I'm thinking that would include both the weekend skiff and the whisp. Are you planning on car-topping, and thus the weight restriction? If you stick by that restriction, it limits the field considerably. If so - I would suggest that you look at the Puddle Duck Racer. Goofy looking things, but smart sailors - fast, responsive, and stable. They're quite easy and inexpensive to build, and a great First Boat. Best with one person, but can carry two (or even three in a pinch).

http://www.storerboatplans.com/Pdr/pdr.html

http://www.pdracer.com/

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3268/2806921082_bfb27b6b4d_o.jpg



If you're willing to relax the weight restrictions, and will consider such boats as the Flint, Summer Breeze, et.al. then you might also look at what I think may just be the Most Boat for the Least Time/Money out there - the Goat Island Skiff by Michael Storer:

http://homepage.mac.com/peterhyndman/GIS/

http://www.storerboatplans.com/GIS/GISplan.html

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3540/3422264316_2551697321.jpg

davebrown
02-27-2010, 08:10 AM
the weekend skiff is a fast build. i do like the looks of the double ended sharpies though.

footstepfollower
02-27-2010, 09:39 AM
Dave Brown, how did you like the handling of the weekend skiff hull while rowing? I ordered the book last night and can't wait to peruse it. It looks a lot like a choice between weekend skiff, the summer breeze, and the $200 sailboat.

Which double ended sharpies do you refer to? I have looked more than once at surf and like the boat, but do not feel it is the dead simple build I am looking for. I absolutely trust my carpentry skills and hope to move quickly to a much more complex and aesthetic design but need a quick and dirty build for mu summer vacation. I need to teach myself to sail in that two week beach vacation.

footstepfollower
02-27-2010, 10:19 AM
Dave Carnell, I love your redesign of the featherwind and it seems to suit all my needs as well. It looks like a relatively fast build? Do you think it possible to put a balanced lug on the boat? I just might need to get these plans to put them alongside the weekend skiff.

I also like summer breeze, but in looking at the website, the drawings I see don't seem to have all the measurements needed to do the panel layout? I've spent a lot of time studying plans I have from Paul Fisher, Gary Dierking and Jim Michalak and they are awesome. Never having built before I will need good plans. Am I missing better summer breeze drawings or not seeing something on the ones there already?

Lewisboats
02-27-2010, 11:38 AM
Are you sure you looked at THIS page? http://www.simplicityboats.com/summerbreezeduckworks.html Seems like everything is there that is needed.

footstepfollower
02-27-2010, 12:12 PM
Steve, Yes I did. As I took more time to study those drawings, things began to make more sense to me. I believe I could go forth from there with only a few questions to ask... For a neophyte to building however, that layout on both plywood and lumber leaves no room at all for error. Cutout would be a jittery affair. In some sense I would be a bit more comfortable building from a complete set of plans/instructions like the weekender book or Dave Carnell's detail of the $200 sailboat. I do like those photos of the weekender though, and if I could cut cleanly needing just two sheets of ply would mean I may spring for higher quality material.

I am torn between the smaller size of the summer breeze (ease of storage in garage) and greater capacity of the weekend skiff or $200 sailboat...

Tealsmith
02-27-2010, 04:11 PM
I built the Carnell boat as my first about 9 years ago and am still using it.

footstepfollower
02-28-2010, 10:42 AM
Cedric,

I hate to admit it, but after poking around the OZ PDR site and checking out some video footage, the PDR with the 105 sf lugsail looks like a blast if one can get past the initial appearance factor! It looks quite nimble and spirited. Only caveat, their incarnation with centerboard and different rigging defeats a lot of the cheap and easy factor from the original concept. Interesting little boat, a lot of performance packed into 8 feet!

davebrown
02-28-2010, 11:53 PM
in response to the question by the OP about which double ended sharpies, i believe that bolger's double enders recommended here qualify. however, for the real deal, i like the double ender that reul parker uses for build photos in his delightful book. i think that when the weekend skiff manual arrives, you will find yourself commiting to that one. one gets the feeling that the weekend skiff book was written with community or school boatbuilding in mind, so little is left to the imagination. i modified mine slightly because at the time i didn't have a trailer and had to cartop it, so i shortened it to 13.5 ft., ala culler, and it was a joy to row, but no speedster. i also took a little of the forward rocker away, since i didn't intend to sail it. my design changes were intuitive and lucky, because i really didn't know what i was doing. i know enough now not to change a design, but at the time i jumped right in with both er, feet.

i do want to build another sharpie someday, and when i do, it will probably be on the order of either an 18 ft chesapeake, or a 13.5 good little skiff--very similar to how my weekend skiff turned out. i am at the moment building a coquina.

i think everyone should start their career out by building a skiff. with the right design they look the way a boat ought to look, yet they are definitely within the grasp of a first-time builder. but by all means make the choice based on your own aesthetic preferences...

consider, if you will, how improved our waterways would be if everyone built a skiff instead of rushing out to buy yet another god awful visual insult like the ubiquitous toilet seat known as the b. whaler...

switters
03-01-2010, 10:51 AM
Are you sure you looked at THIS page? http://www.simplicityboats.com/summerbreezeduckworks.html Seems like everything is there that is needed.

I've built one from those plans, Michalac also has a book, Boat Building for Beginners and Beyond, that has the summer breeze in there with a bit more detail, but looking at the other designs in the book helps fill in the few small gaps for a first time boat builder.

David G
03-01-2010, 12:08 PM
Cedric,

I hate to admit it, but after poking around the OZ PDR site and checking out some video footage, the PDR with the 105 sf lugsail looks like a blast if one can get past the initial appearance factor! It looks quite nimble and spirited. Only caveat, their incarnation with centerboard and different rigging defeats a lot of the cheap and easy factor from the original concept. Interesting little boat, a lot of performance packed into 8 feet!

If you can get over the looks, the PDR's are wonderful. Just a huge amount of simple, cheap fun.

You won't want to put 105 sq. ft. on one though. That's the size of the balanced lug from the Goat Island Skiff. The balanced lug I have on my PDR - at 86 sq. ft. - is one of the largest extant. I wouldn't be inclined to put toooo much more on her. Mik actually did plug a GIS rig into one of his PDR's as an experiment. I doubt he'd recommend it, and I'm pretty sure he's never done it again. But - no worries - as you can see from the foto above, the 86 is plenty of sail for that boat and can really send you scooting.

Lewisboats
03-01-2010, 02:10 PM
I've built one from those plans, Michalac also has a book, Boat Building for Beginners and Beyond, that has the summer breeze in there with a bit more detail, but looking at the other designs in the book helps fill in the few small gaps for a first time boat builder.

Ummm...sorry to disagree but Jim Michalak has only Jim's plans in there. The only sail boat in there is the Mayfly14 but there are also two row boats: the QT Skiff row and the Robote. It is a great book though and Mayfly14 is a good beginner's boat. It is very easy to make and will easily accommodate two plus some gear. I should have thought of it myself...along with Woobo...I have plans for both plus the book. They take the same sail and rig and I borrowed it for a different design that I am building. I had the sail already that I bought for something else (hull hanging in the garage from the rafters...and so it will stay for a while) so I figured I'd go ahead and use it. Jim's plans are cheap through Duckworks and you can get all the supplies needed through there too (Jim and Chuck have know each other for a Long time).

switters
03-02-2010, 11:35 AM
Ummm...sorry to disagree but Jim Michalak has only Jim's plans in there. The only sail boat in there is the Mayfly14 but there are also two row boats: the QT Skiff row and the Robote. It is a great book though and Mayfly14 is a good beginner's boat. It is very easy to make and will easily accommodate two plus some gear. I should have thought of it myself...along with Woobo...I have plans for both plus the book. They take the same sail and rig and I borrowed it for a different design that I am building. I had the sail already that I bought for something else (hull hanging in the garage from the rafters...and so it will stay for a while) so I figured I'd go ahead and use it. Jim's plans are cheap through Duckworks and you can get all the supplies needed through there too (Jim and Chuck have know each other for a Long time).

You are absolutely correct, my apologies. The book I was trying to remember was Gavin Atkins, Ultra Simple Boat building.

Lewisboats
03-02-2010, 11:48 AM
Got that too here somewhere...most of my books are still in boxes. One of my boats is in there too...nothing special, just a little gp motor skiff for whatever.

switters
03-02-2010, 11:55 AM
not to thread drift this too much but you had posted some drawings of a small cruiser with cabin that looked very modern a year or so ago, I think it had a gem sounding type name. Any progress on that?

I was very taken with the lines when I first saw it.

Lewisboats
03-02-2010, 12:09 PM
Still playing with it...a bit here and there. Do you remember what color it was? Green or Blue...different sizes and slightly different lines you see.

switters
03-02-2010, 12:20 PM
Still playing with it...a bit here and there. Do you remember what color it was? Green or Blue...different sizes and slightly different lines you see.


I cant remember which book I saw a design in just a few weeks ago, I wont even try to guess at the color of the hull drawing from a year ago. But, best of luck and if it helps any it reminded me of the lynx 14.

Lewisboats
03-02-2010, 01:09 PM
I know the feeling...I believe it was Saphire.

footstepfollower
03-06-2010, 11:35 AM
I have Michalak's book and have learned a lot from it. Mayfly 14 looks like an easy build, but is too heavy to cartop. I may use his leeboard and sailmaking info though on whatever I build. I want to build from my piccup plans but need something quicker at this time.

I did order Gavin Atkins' book Ultrasimple Boat Building and it contains more info on the Summer Breeze design, this may be the book you were thinking of...

Dave B, I have Reul Parker's book and definitely want to build from there as I gain experience. I love the lines of those boats, and sharpie's make a lot of sense in thin South FL Gulf waters. I like the chesapake, his gato negro, and would love to build egret! There is a 20' Sprit Sail Skiff a few miles from here pictured in Wooden Boat I would love to build in plywood someday too. Your Coquina looks breathtaking. Any photos posted for us?

By the way, the Weekend Skiff book arrives yesterday and I think she is the one for me right now. Good looks, bulletproof instructions, cheap and light. I would build with the wider transom to allow motor use and more sail area. I will eventually need advice as to the suitability of substituting a leeboard for the daggerboard and adding more sail area... Great, well illustrated book. Looking forward to the build process!

davebrown
03-07-2010, 01:29 AM
1. my coquina build: i am keeping quiet on it until i get through one confusing patch which likely will involve a variety of very interesting and novel swear words, and building that section multiple times. the only thing on coquina that i haven't done on some other build is the deck beams/carlons, so i will invent several disastrous ways to put them on upside down, i mean the deckbeams not the builder, and then after two or three gallons of wine, i will get them right. my errors are creative and an inspiration to many on this forum, who have started where i left off and committed even greater crimes against the designers than i. at the moment i have all the molds cut out and leaning against an expensive german convertible so that my wife can't get in and out without crunching the door, well, or a reasonable fascimile of the molds anyway, the ladder frame built, and a laminating jig for the stem. i have got out the 20 or so strips for the stem, and hope to start on the stem tomorrow.

2. i no longer have the book on the weekend skiff (my exwife does along with several heirloom tools, which i am sure she gets lots of use out of), but i put the keelson down the center ala the sailing model. i then used 1/4" flooring without glass, with a 1x6 keel, as i recall. take a look at that section on the sail version; that worked ideally for me in keeping the boat strong yet reasonably lightweight. putting in a 1/2 " ply floor might be stronger, but not as light. as i said, i am surprised that more people don't build these.

SBrookman
03-07-2010, 04:27 PM
Dave B, I have Reul Parker's book and definitely want to build from there as I gain experience. I love the lines of those boats, and sharpie's make a lot of sense in thin South FL Gulf waters. I like the chesapake, his gato negro, and would love to build egret!

You don't need experience to build some of Parker's sharpies, that is speaking from experience as I built his 19' Ohio Sharpie (Gato Negro) with no prior experience and it was a pleasant experience at that! It is a bit ironic that I moved from SW FL to NJ prior to building her.

footstepfollower
03-07-2010, 09:30 PM
Steve, you made that build look easy. The boat looks great too, thanks for logging it with photos. I too was hooked after reading the Sharpie book, and reading Reul's description of Gato Negro has me wanting to build one. Give us a more detailed sailing/handling description when you log a few more miles on her?