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Shang
02-24-2010, 06:41 PM
BBC, 23 February 2010

“Dubbed The Boneyard, but officially known as the 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group (AMARG) facility, this sprawling US airbase is reputed to be the world's largest military aircraft cemetery.
Spread across the huge 2,600 acre site, equivalent in size to 1,430 football pitches, is a collection of over 4,000 retired aircraft including nearly every plane the US armed forces have flown since World War II.
Now, for the first time, a series of high resolution satellite images of the four square mile-site have been released by Google Earth. They show in incredible detail the full range of aircraft found at the site.”

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/8530165.stm

It’s always seemed funny to me that anyone driving past The Boneyard in Tucson could plainly see the rows on rows of military aircraft, but when I looked for it on Google Earth there was nothing but sage brush to be seen.

I have mixed feelings about the place.
As a warbird buff I’m glad that these planes are being preserved.
As a taxpayer I wonder what it has cost to keep this scrap yard.
As a naturalist it pleases me to have such a huge shelter area for coyotes and bobcats.

Peerie Maa
02-24-2010, 06:49 PM
BBC, 23 February 2010

“Dubbed The Boneyard, but officially known as the 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group (AMARG) facility, this sprawling US airbase is reputed to be the world's largest military aircraft cemetery.
Spread across the huge 2,600 acre site, equivalent in size to 1,430 football pitches, is a collection of over 4,000 retired aircraft including nearly every plane the US armed forces have flown since World War II.
Now, for the first time, a series of high resolution satellite images of the four square mile-site have been released by Google Earth. They show in incredible detail the full range of aircraft found at the site.”

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/8530165.stm

It’s always seemed funny to me that anyone driving past The Boneyard in Tucson could plainly see the rows on rows of military aircraft, but when I looked for it on Google Earth there was nothing but sage brush to be seen.

I have mixed feelings about the place.
As a warbird buff I’m glad that these planes are being preserved.
As a taxpayer I wonder what it has cost to keep this scrap yard.
As a naturalist it pleases me to have such a huge shelter area for coyotes and bobcats.

Here is a part of your answer

Officials at the base say that the parts reclaimed and aircraft withdrawn turns every tax dollar spent into 11 dollars in return.

paladin
02-24-2010, 06:50 PM
It costs nothing to run the scrapyard.......parts, movie rentals etc have repaid the taxpayer about 10 dollars for every one spent to store/care for the planes. Rhis isn't the only such place like this, there's one outside Denver that's privately owned and is storage for civilian/commercial aircraft and tooling.

bobbys
02-24-2010, 07:24 PM
I would like to sit in some of those and play pilot!:D

Vince Brennan
02-24-2010, 07:46 PM
Welcome to do so if you can stand 140º temperatures (+)... no open windows on those birds.

ccmanuals
02-24-2010, 09:42 PM
If you are ever in Tuscon they have daily scheduled tours out of DM.

Shang
02-24-2010, 09:53 PM
Here is a part of your answer

"...Officials at the base say that the parts reclaimed and aircraft withdrawn turns every tax dollar spent into 11 dollars in return."


I'm not expert in aircraft salvage, but I suspect that comment is baloney on the part of "officials at the base," and by pork barreling politicians from Arizona.

Of how much value are "...dozens of F-14 fighter planes which were retired from the US Navy in 2006..." and "...B-52 Cold War-era bombers that were retired in the 1990s..."?
The F-14 was first deployed in 1974.
The B-52 dates back to 1955...the crews that first flew them are now collecting Social Security.

I've seen the coyotes hunting mice around the rotting tires of Arizona's stockpiled planes, I can't believe that these have strategic value.

My father-in-law was in charge of the program to "mothball" the B-17's at the end of WW II... in case these were needed again to re-fight the Second World War. Our parents and grandparents paid for that program. Those planes were eventually melted down for scrap which was sold by the lowest bidder.

bobbys
02-24-2010, 10:05 PM
Welcome to do so if you can stand 140º temperatures (+)... no open windows on those birds..

So much for the Snoopy Scarf!:D

Clive P
02-25-2010, 09:05 AM
I spotted at least 6 Canberras. Wot did U find? Clive P

Shang
02-25-2010, 09:32 AM
I see your point, Norm.
And I really do like the idea of preserving and maintaining some of the older planes.

willmarsh3
02-25-2010, 10:29 AM
I think you're wrong about that.

I saw a TV special about the place maybe a year ago, ... About the only thing not recycled was the skin and basic airframe.

Someone even used the wings to build a house.

http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com/index.php?fuseaction=wanappln.projectview&upload_id=1473