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ishmael
02-17-2010, 12:11 PM
It was one of those stormy days, the waves breaking like mad, the wind out of the East. What Hemingway imortalized in "The Three Day Blow." A Michigan tradition.

George, a cousin by marraige and older said, "Hey men, let's go." So we did.

I fifteen foot Lyman. We were pummelled the whole way across, water to bail and no thought of being dry. But never a sputter or doubt. We went and returned, wet the whole way.

I grew up around boats, and have never been frightened by their inherent capacity to drown. But those few hours cemented it. Nothing big, just quite a ride in a storm.

Your stories?

LeeG
02-17-2010, 12:20 PM
George was a cousin or uncle?

http://www.woodenboat.com/forum/showthread.php?t=108481&highlight=lyman

I remember one time an uncle decided it was a grand time for a boat ride. He had a little Lyman, a thirteen foot outboard runabout. George took my cousin Randy and me for a wild ride across the lake and back, just for the joy of running a small boat in that swell. We were full of smiles when we got back. Wet, a bit beaten up, but happy.

George was considered a bit of an eccentric. He had married into the clan, and was never quite accepted, but I loved him. He always had the devil as a twinkle in his eye, and was always ready for an adventure.

Michael D. Storey
02-17-2010, 01:13 PM
I was taking as delivery a mid-thirties sloop, nothin fancy, down the Bay. Being August I knew that the late afternoopn held a change of getting skunked, but it was so profound that there was no steering to be had. About that time a Mearsk Liner was coming south, as I was, and he created a lee for me. I could hear him slow down, and match my speed, until the worst had past. He mighta saved my life.

I was in the same waters the following fall, another local delivery, in a dense fog. I had the engine off, hoping to hear any 'company'. I had every piece of cookware on board up the spinnaker halyard, to help me be seen on the screen. Well, up ahead, I saw bright spot in the loom, and made for it. Turned to be a hole in the fog, maybe 2 boatlengths across. It was full of swans. I grabbed Elizabeth by the collar; she wanted to have swan for breakfast. (Elizabeth is a big dog) Well, we ghosted through them, and they parted to allow us to pass, and then closed behind us. Sailed back into the fog and on south. As usual, once we were below the Bay Bridge, the weather was different. Stayed on a broad reach, after it had lifted, all the way to Solomon's. Never saw those swans again.

Breakaway
02-17-2010, 01:32 PM
Sometime in the 80's, me a bout 19...ran to Veatch Canyon, 120 miles SE of Long Island on a tuna fishing trip (sportfishing). Did it all the time back then, We were in a 47 Buddy Davis that my buddy ran. He and the rest of the crew were "old salts" etc.
Wind came up out of the NNE. Honking. Hellacious waves. Couldnt go home into those head seas...ran downhill to New Jersey, made Point Pleasant on fumes. At one point, my older and more seasoned buddy asked me if I was scared. "No," says I. He replied: " Then you're an A$$ H@$#!

Older now, I live by my "belly barometer" or "sphincter factor" on common occassion.

Rich Jones
02-17-2010, 05:39 PM
When I was young and stupid, I'd take my 14' canoe out on Lake Champlain (10 miles wide were I lived) on the roughest days possible. Lots of wind and 4' seas. Not wearing a life jacket. I'd surf and jump and had a ball. And I wouldn't hug the shoreline, either. Went way the hell out there. Like I said, stupid...

BrianW
02-17-2010, 08:01 PM
I was in the same waters the following fall, another local delivery, in a dense fog. I had the engine off, hoping to hear any 'company'. I had every piece of cookware on board up the spinnaker halyard, to help me be seen on the screen. Well, up ahead, I saw bright spot in the loom, and made for it. Turned to be a hole in the fog, maybe 2 boatlengths across. It was full of swans. I grabbed Elizabeth by the collar; she wanted to have swan for breakfast. (Elizabeth is a big dog) Well, we ghosted through them, and they parted to allow us to pass, and then closed behind us. Sailed back into the fog and on south.

Nice mental image.

Domesticated_Mr. Know It All
02-19-2010, 03:34 PM
Lymans were built for Lake Erie.
There's no boat I'd rather be in during a storm on Lake Erie.
Nuff said.

Captain Blight
02-19-2010, 03:42 PM
I didn't have my Lyman for long, but it was very well-behaved in any kind of chop the Mississippi River could throw at it.

Some of the tugs I've worked on, not so much. Wallowy old fat pigs.

C. Ross
02-19-2010, 05:15 PM
Some of the tugs I've worked on, not so much. Wallowy old fat pigs.

Itasca might have some waltz in her step?

LeeG
02-19-2010, 08:04 PM
Itasca?

http://www.piragis.com/wenonah/wenonahitasca.jpg

ishmael
02-19-2010, 09:03 PM
Mike is a little testy, but we'll forgive him.

Lymans and their open architecture were interesting boats. An open skiff. If I were trying to keep the water out they wouldn't jump to mind but a very fine boat in its hull.

ishmael
02-20-2010, 03:52 AM
George was actually a blood relation. The son of a common great grandfather, whatever that made him. He was a sort of black sheep, always getting tangled up, but that made him interesting when I was fifteen and he was thirty. Always into the outdoors stuff, camping and what have you, which also made him interesting. A very good heart. At a time all the cottagers were holed up in their cottages, he had us kids out camping under the stars.

George died young, run down by his own car at a gas station. The car started to roll and he tried to stop it. He had a devil may care attitude about him. I'll always remember his face, it was usually crunched up in a grin.