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Bill Huson
02-05-2010, 09:05 PM
My project tonight was to assemble a 22' birdsmouth mast. By myself - no assistant in sight. The eight pieces were 14mm x8mm and kind of floppy. Pre-coating done, but the ambient temp was low and the WEST resin was slow to kick. I had the staves set up on 1/4" wood strips and duct tape flat on the work table I fashioned out of laser leveled infeed/outfeed tables I use with the saw and router table. While the staves were still kinda slimy I slid the strips out and positioned the staves edge to edge on the duct tape pieces. Time for epoxy glue!

My mix was microfibers and silica. The microfibers were in a zip-lock bag, add 206 hardener resin mix, knead until mixed, add silica, knead bag some more. Then I nipped off a bag corner to lay down about an 1/8" glue line and attacked the strips! Jeeze Louise, took 3 bags to get her done. Might have made it in two ewxcept one bag had a blowout. Change slimy gloves for about the third time, continue. Then I picked up a duct tape strip and rolled the mast together - sort of. Kept on rolling and taping rest of duct tape strips, change slimy gloves, and on with the zip ties. Tightened those zip ties up with pliers, broke a few, but after gripping, twisting, and cinching up zip ties the mast was together. Of course I used way to much glue, so I spent a good half hour with a plastic scraper removing excess glue.

Curing. One 22' birdsmouth mast blank.

SamSam
02-05-2010, 09:19 PM
Sounds like it went smoothly! It's like you gave yourself a present you get to open tomorrow. :)

I just saw your question on another thread about using titebond II. My experience with that with cabinet projects was there was not a whole lot of open time. To slather up 16 sides 22' long and assemble in 30 minutes or so seems like a rush to me.

There is one trick that might have worked though. The yellow wood glues can be applied to pieces and then let to dry unassembled. The pieces can then be assembled and pressure applied (clamped) and the glue set off with heat. I used to do that with curved veneer/marquetry projects that would fit in the kitchen oven. The problem would be to get a mast up to the heat range needed, I think it was about 180F.

Bill Huson
02-05-2010, 09:47 PM
Sounds like it went smoothly! It's like you gave yourself a present you get to open tomorrow. :)

I wouldn't say "smoothly." There was a bit of wrestling involved, and of course a few garage words tossed about to tint the air blue, but I managed to convince the tree pieces to cooperate.

Rich Jones
02-05-2010, 10:06 PM
Helpers are nice, but there's a certain satisfaction in knowing you can do it yourself; figuring out the methods. I'm dealing with floppy 4mm planking on my new pulling boat, but getting it done without too much cursing. What boat will have the pleasure of this mast?

Bill, I see that you live in New Bern. My dear old Mom lives there, too. She's the ultimate "church lady" over at Christ Church in the center of town.

Falcon500
02-05-2010, 10:49 PM
hopefully you checked to see if it had the right amount of curve or straightness, this fall i made a 10ft box mast and used plastic resin glue, i got it all screwed (temporarily) and took a look down it and it had a bend to the port side, oh was i worried, i flipped it to the opposite side and slapped it and the pieces slid were i wanted'em. whew...

Hope to see pics tomorrow!;)

Bill Huson
02-06-2010, 10:02 AM
Helpers are nice, but there's a certain satisfaction in knowing you can do it yourself; figuring out the methods. I'm dealing with floppy 4mm planking on my new pulling boat, but getting it done without too much cursing. What boat will have the pleasure of this mast?

Bill, I see that you live in New Bern. My dear old Mom lives there, too. She's the ultimate "church lady" over at Christ Church in the center of town.

Boat: A Richard Woods design - "Pixie" - a 14' beach catamaran. WB plan # something or other. The hulls were 4mm S&G with 4mm bulkheads also S&G in place. Very twisty. Fun!

Christ Church is a pretty church, and as you said, smack in the center of town.

Rich Jones
02-06-2010, 10:08 AM
Boat: A Richard Woods design - "Pixie" - a 14' beach catamaran. WB plan # something or other. The hulls were 4mm S&G with 4mm bulkheads also S&G in place. Very twisty. Fun!

Christ Church is a pretty church, and as you said, smack in the center of town.

Hope we'll see pics of the completed project.

Christ Church just had a huge addition put on to which my mother pledged a healthy chunk of change. She's got some nerve, spending my inheritance!!http://www.woodenboat.com/forum/images/icons/icon7.gif

Bill Huson
02-06-2010, 10:09 AM
hopefully you checked to see if it had the right amount of curve or straightness, this fall i made a 10ft box mast and used plastic resin glue, i got it all screwed (temporarily) and took a look down it and it had a bend to the port side, oh was i worried, i flipped it to the opposite side and slapped it and the pieces slid were i wanted'em. whew...

Hope to see pics tomorrow!;)

I had it laid out straight on my cobbled together platform, and had a straight back edge as well. Sighting down the mast this AM it appears fairly straight, and even though the epoxy hasn't reached full-on hard yet the mast seems stiff. 19 pounds right now.

SamSam
02-06-2010, 02:18 PM
I wouldn't say "smoothly." There was a bit of wrestling involved, and of course a few garage words tossed about to tint the air blue, but I managed to convince the tree pieces to cooperate.
Yes, but I didn't hear of any abject lamenting, sobbing, gnashing of teeth and rending of garments. No hair on fire panic, destruction of property or avoidance of yourself by loved ones and pets. And even today there are no questions about how well does epoxy saturated wood burn. Sounds successfully smooth to me. :)

Bill Huson
02-06-2010, 05:25 PM
Yes, but I didn't hear of any abject lamenting, sobbing, gnashing of teeth and rending of garments. No hair on fire panic, destruction of property or avoidance of yourself by loved ones and pets. And even today there are no questions about how well does epoxy saturated wood burn. Sounds successfully smooth to me. :)

Yes, using your scale of success, it went smooth:D