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View Full Version : More on paint cans, will this work?



John B
02-04-2010, 02:34 PM
Some might remember a rant of mine about Goldspar varnish a few years ago. Somewhere in time the paint manufacturers have decided to make lighter and lighter tins for their products and here if you buy 2 pot paint the smallest you can now purchase is a 1 L tin . My goldspar rant was about opening a tin of that product with an inordinate amount of care using wide flat levers and desperately attempting to keep the lid in good condition for resealing. No , no chance , you get one go buddy and as far as we're concerned you can chuck out the rest.

Not so good when you have small jobs to do.

The lids on the hardener component of this two pot stuff are sealed with some sort of goo and are under vacuum as well, but the paint itself seems to have a good robust can. In the past when I've resealed the hardener lid , I've wrapped some cling film over it and taped it shut as well, and that worked reasonably well.

What I'm trying this time for the touch up ( and I have undercoat and topcoat to do) is this. I bought some cheap plastic syringes and I punched a corresponding hole in the can lid. Syringed out the hardener/ catalyst I need and resealed with tape between coats.
I'm thinking that when I've finished I'll plop a blob of sikaflex back over the hole. I won't get any vacuum effect obviously , but at least I'll retain most of the stuff for the next ( bigger ) job.

fair enough? any other ideas?

ahh yes .. I found the goldspar rant .. my , I was wound up wasn't I.
http://www.woodenboat.com/forum/showthread.php?t=7626&highlight=Goldspar+rant

The Bigfella
02-04-2010, 02:39 PM
I haven't tried it with two-pack, but I use PET bottles with one-pack varnish.... just squeeze the bottle until the air is removed and re-seal. Works a treat.

John B
02-04-2010, 02:46 PM
Its the catalyst component which is the problem with those Ian. The paint itself seems to be just fine and the tin is robust enough to reseal nicely without damage.

Thats a great tip re the PET.. you said that back on the other thread. I had a mate who carried petrol for his outboard in a PET bottle. The only bit which breaks down is the little foam seal in the cap, he just took that out and it was fine.

Breakaway
02-04-2010, 03:25 PM
I vacuum-seal fish filets in a homey sort of way. Might be applicable to your can stowage. Place the article in a ziplock bag, submerge the bag in water to the level of the zipper and seal. Water pressure on the bags exterior pushes out all air.

Todd Bradshaw
02-04-2010, 06:05 PM
I use one of these gizmos on paint and varnish cans (or transfer contents to a jar and use it on the jar). It actually works extremely well. I'll usually add a small hunk of clear packing tape over their seal strip for extra insurance after sucking out the air, but you can open the can or jar four years later and the paint or varnish looks and behaves just like it did when you sealed it. Some of the companies that sell them will ship anywhere. Considering what components it's made from, it's a bit over-priced, but it certainly does work.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VbnJfs6YUE

Peter Malcolm Jardine
02-04-2010, 06:19 PM
The problem that is created in a half full tin of anything is that after you have opened the can, you let in oxygen. The lower the level in the can, the more oxygen is trapped inside even when the lid is sealed well. One of the oldest tricks I know is a bag of kids marbles. Put them in the can until the level is brought up to where it was when the can was full. It keeps the oxygen that would be trapped to a minimum. Frankly, I use so much of a given varnish or paint nowadays that I don't have anywhere near the storage issues I used to have.

paul oman
02-04-2010, 06:43 PM
many products get an extended life if you squirt in a bit of propane (from your shop torch) before putting on the lid. You can also turn the cans upside down so the paint film is at the bottom of the can. For caulking tube based products, stick the open end into a small bottle filled with petroleum jelly/vasoline. - took me 50 years to learn those tricks.

paladin
02-04-2010, 07:01 PM
Get a seltzer bottle, don't put anything in it except the CO2 cartridge, shoot a bit of CO2 into the can before sealing it....it's heavier than air so gets it pretty full.

Breakaway
02-04-2010, 07:47 PM
The problem that is created in a half full tin of anything is that after you have opened the can, you let in oxygen. The lower the level in the can, the more oxygen is trapped inside even when the lid is sealed well. One of the oldest tricks I know is a bag of kids marbles. Put them in the can until the level is brought up to where it was when the can was full. It keeps the oxygen that would be trapped to a minimum. Frankly, I use so much of a given varnish or paint nowadays that I don't have anywhere near the storage issues I used to have.

This reminded me a something an oldtimer taught me when I was a kid working at a boatyard. He'd inflate a balloon and put it in a partially-empty can of whatever before resealing it to displace the air.

PeterSibley
02-05-2010, 04:10 AM
Get a seltzer bottle, don't put anything in it except the CO2 cartridge, shoot a bit of CO2 into the can before sealing it....it's heavier than air so gets it pretty full.

That's a good one , the Mormons use dry ice to keep the oxygen out of stored grain .

I've been using lpg but CO2 would be better ?

jerry bark
02-05-2010, 07:43 AM
watch at a yard sale to find a home vacuum sealer. the one i have has a canning jar sealing adapter. if you put your varnish or catalyst in a canning jar you can then vac out the jar nicely. using a shot of propane would really do the deed then.

jerry

George Ray
02-05-2010, 08:03 AM
I was going to suggest flooding the can with Argon from your TIG welder or to buy a little bottle of nitrogen gas that the wine dealers sell to preserve open bottles of wine, however the solutions already presented are AWESOME!. I should bookmark this thread and type up a little card summarizing the tips and stick it to the bulletin board (wall) in the shop.

CundysHarbor
02-05-2010, 08:50 AM
I've had good luck punching holes for two #10 selr tapping screws in the lid. For small jobs, remove screws, invert can and let the varnish drain into a filter cone. I made a cone holder that fits over a paper paint pot so I don't have to stand there holding on while the varnish slowly drains. Replace screws, invert can to get a seal on the threads and there it is.
Dave

Eric D
02-05-2010, 01:19 PM
smaller glass canning jar or even baby food glass jars. As the volume gets smaller, go with smaller jars. Store them upside down on their lids.

Marble trick works well, but then tip upside down, that will keep the solvents from "seeping away"

Plastic Wood brand filler (which has acetone as a thinner) is MADE to be stored upside down, printing is even done that way to remind you. Works well. Just make sure the can is sealed well first.....don't ask..yes I found out the hard way, or should I say my wife found my mistake.......Oh, water based ones can sometimes RUST the lids, only do oil based upside down.