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Osborne Russell
01-30-2010, 11:35 PM
The United States went to war with Spain with the customary fraudulent claims of spreading freedom.

The people we were supposedly helping -- the Filipinos – learned the hard way what America is really about, now that the Reds have taken over.

The Filipinos were of course at war the Spanish colonial government before America got involved, just like our esteemed founders were at war with the English before the French got involved. Happily the French didn’t betray us like we betrayed the Filipinos.


The February, 1898 explosion and sinking of a U.S. Navy warship in Havana harbor during an ongoing revolution in Cuba led in April of that year to a declaration of war against Spain by the United States . . . Meanwhile, United States Consul E. Spencer Pratt and Rounceville Wildman paid Emilio Aguinaldo a visit while in exile in Hong Kong. The two persuaded Aguinaldo to again take up the mantle of leadership in the revolution. He agreed to return to the country with Commodore Dewey.

By June, the island of Luzon, except for Manila and the port of Cavite, was under Filipino control. The revolutionaries were laying siege to Manila and cutting off its food and water supply. With most of the archipelago under his control, Aguinaldo decided it was time to establish a Philippine government.

On June 12, 1898, Aguinaldo declared the independence of the Philippines in Kawit, Cavite, establishing the First Philippine Republic under Asia's first democratic constitution.

By August, the Spaniards had surrendered Manila, and the Americans had occupied it. Governor-General Fermin Jaudenes had made a secret agreement with Dewey and General Wesley Merritt. Jaudenes specifically requested to surrender only to the Americans, not to the Filipino rebels.

In the “Battle” of Manila, the United States captured the city from the Spanish. This battle marked an end of Filipino-American collaboration, as Filipino forces were prevented from entering the captured city of Manila, an action deeply resented by the Filipinos.

Spain and the United States sent commissioners to Paris to draw up the terms of the Treaty of Paris which ended the Spanish-American War. The Filipino representative, Felipe Agoncillo, was excluded from sessions as the revolutionary government was not recognized by the family of nations.

The first Philippine Republic rebelled against the U.S. occupation, resulting in the Philippine-American War (1899–1913).

One common view of how the conflict began was that on February 4, 1899, a misunderstanding occurred between the two nations. A Filipino soldier was shot by an American soldier, William W. Grayson, at now Silencio Street, Manila. Grayson's own account states:


In a moment, something rose up slowly in front of us. It was a Filipino. I yelled “Halt!” and made it pretty loud, for I was accustomed to challenging the officer of the guard in approved military style. I challenged him with another loud “halt!” Then he shouted “halto!” to me. Well, I thought the best thing to do was to shoot him.

Aguinaldo subsequently tried to stop the hostilities and sent emissaries to the Americans, but General Elwell Otis replied: "Fighting having begun, must go on to the grim end.” U.S. President William McKinley later told reporters “that the insurgents had attacked Manila” in justifying war on the Philippines.

So the newspapers whipped up the rabble into war fury, the politicians and their capitalist backers capitalized, and we got fourteen years of war on terror. Rudyard Kipling wrote “The White Man’s Burden: The United States And The Phillipine Islands”.


Ambition, interest, land-hunger, pride, the mere joy of fighting, whatever it may be, we are animated by a new sensation . . . The taste of Empire is in the mouth of the people even as the taste of blood in the jungle. – The Washington Post

The way the country puked up its ancient principles at the first touch of temptation was sickening. – William James

We jettison all that was most precious in our national cargo . . . I fear that America is beginning a long course of error and wrong and is likely to become more and more a power for disturbance and barbarism. – Charles Elliot Norton

And as for a flag for the Philippine Province, it is easily managed. We can have a special one -- just our usual flag, with the white stripes painted black and the stars replaced by the skull and cross-bones. – Mark Twain, Vice President of the Anti-Imperialist League

We hold that the policy known as imperialism is hostile to liberty and tends toward militarism, an evil from which it has been our glory to be free. We regret that it has become necessary in the land of Washington and Lincoln to reaffirm that all men, of whatever race or color, are entitled to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. We maintain that governments derive their just powers from the consent of the governed. We insist that the subjugation of any people is "criminal aggression" and open disloyalty to the distinctive principles of our government. -- Platform of the American Anti-Imperialist League, 1899

I cannot bound my vision by the blood-stained trenches around Manila-where every red drop, whether from the veins of an American soldier or a misguided Filipino, is anguish to my heart -- but by the broad range of future years, when . . . [Filipinos] shall for ages hence bless the American republic because it emancipated and redeemed their fatherland, and set them in the pathway of the world's best civilization. -- US President William McKinley

purri
01-31-2010, 06:49 AM
So what's new in US "manifest destiny"??????

Nicholas Scheuer
01-31-2010, 07:51 AM
What's new is "Moby Nick Manifest Destiny".

Tomorrow, Monday, Feb 1, 2010, I take over as Czar, Head Honcho, Chairman Of The Board, President, Chief Cook & Bottle Washer, and Penultimate Potentate of all lands and seas lying within a 4000-mile radius of Rockford Illinois.

This is because I know what's best for everyone withing my purview, and my heart is pure.

Get used to it.

Moby Nick

Tristan
01-31-2010, 08:11 AM
My grandfather was over there. They had orders to take no prisoners, so any prisoners they happened to get were always shot as they "attempted to escape." He says he was not involved in this stuff. I hope he wasn't.

stevebaby
01-31-2010, 08:13 AM
What's new is "Moby Nick Manifest Destiny".

Tomorrow, Monday, Feb 1, 2010, I take over as Czar, Head Honcho, Chairman Of The Board, President, Chief Cook & Bottle Washer, and Penultimate Potentate of all lands and seas lying within a 4000-mile radius of Rockford Illinois.

This is because I know what's best for everyone withing my purview, and my heart is pure.

Get used to it.

Moby Nick
http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1326/1226015318_6648b94cd6_o.jpg

David W Pratt
01-31-2010, 09:11 AM
FWIW, the whistle from the Maine is mounted on the wall of the bar at Larchmont Yacht Club.

paladin
01-31-2010, 09:17 AM
also from Kipling:
It is not good for the Christian health to hustle the Asian brown,
For the Christian riles and the Asian smiles,
and weareth the Christian down.
At the end of the fight is a tombstone white,
with the name of the late deceased.
an epitaph drear, "A fool lies here", who tried to hustle the East.

Hollingsworth
01-31-2010, 10:20 AM
also from Kipling:
It is not good for the Christian health to hustle the Asian brown,
For the Christian riles and the Asian smiles,
and weareth the Christian down.
At the end of the fight is a tombstone white,
with the name of the late deceased.
an epitaph drear, "A fool lies here", who tried to hustle the East.

I always thought "The Man Who Would Be King" by Kipling was prophetic when it comes to the Western world and Afghanistan.

jerryrichter
01-31-2010, 10:22 AM
FWIW, the whistle from the Maine is mounted on the wall of the bar at Larchmont Yacht Club.

The anchor from the Maine is located in city park in Reading, PA. Go figure.

Osborne Russell
01-31-2010, 11:40 AM
The wikipedia article on "The White Man's Burden" deals with the very substantial argument that it's really an anti-imperialist poem. One guy put it something like this: "Kipling was an imperialist without illusions, which is a way of saying he wasn't really an imperialist."

There's always an effort to make imperialism look like pragmatism. Supposedly the difference between the Phillipines and Iraq is that Iraq is/was a threat to America's national security.

An examination of the facts exceeds the rabble's attention span. Switch the focus to God and destiny and so on, and they will give you their votes, and their offspring. In return, they expect to be absolved forever from all responsiblity.