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View Full Version : Sometimes it's time to knock off and go home !



PeterSibley
01-08-2010, 12:18 AM
I was tired today , up too late last night after the grandkids got home .Anyway this Morning I slipped on the stairs ,landed on my back ,wacked an elbow .Ouch but nothing serious .One sore elbow . Half an hour ago I stepped backwards off a low scaffold ,only a metre and landed in a heap ....wacked the other elbow and damn near broke a finger !

DOWN TOOLS !:rolleyes:
Power off , finish .

I hurt .A good thing I bounce .

The Bigfella
01-08-2010, 12:19 AM
Watch it mate.... these things often come in threes

PeterSibley
01-08-2010, 12:20 AM
I'll try not to drop my beer !

leikec
01-08-2010, 12:49 AM
My goodness! You should meet my wife...she manages to hurt herself at least 3 times a week. You guys could get a group rate at the ER....

Good luck--and be careful.

Jeff C

WX
01-08-2010, 01:51 AM
The gods are telling you to taking it easy Peter. I did a bit of work on the shed extension and some brushcutting. nearly had my day ruined when I looked down and saw my gumboots covered in big mobs of angry Jumping Ants. I stepped back off the nest and there must have been a 100 of the little buggers looking for a fight...phew.

skuthorp
01-08-2010, 02:22 AM
Anne disturbed some big black bullants doing the same thing, only one bite luckily. Fatigue makes you clumsy, messes with your judgement, and your dexterity. Not good at heights or around machinery. I find myself up and working at 6am and still at it at 8pm. I'll have to learn to take breaks.

The Bigfella
01-08-2010, 02:26 AM
With me its more if I eat the wrong foods. I've done some really dumb things after eating the wrong foods.... like connecting red to black, black to red, BANG. Oops.

Let's not include alcohol as a food though.... that's a whole different case.

PeterSibley
01-08-2010, 04:25 AM
All's well though , just one fairly bung elbow ..could be worse .

Phillip Allen
01-08-2010, 04:44 AM
been hanging out with Dingo? :)

downthecreek
01-08-2010, 04:49 AM
Glad you bounced! Hope the elbow recovers quickly.

We are still frozen and snowed in. Worst "cold snap" for 30 years, they say. We rarely get any snow in the winter. Occasionally a light dusting in January or February. Lots of busted bones. Don't you bust any. There are better ways to have fun. :)

Phillip Allen
01-08-2010, 04:54 AM
Glad you bounced! Hope the elbow recovers quickly.

We are still frozen and snowed in. Worst "cold snap" for 30 years, they say. We rarely get any snow in the winter. Occasionally a light dusting in January or February. Lots of busted bones. Don't you bust any. There are better ways to have fun. :)

be careful not to throw snow balls at Chicago cops... :) (at least not if they're driving a $60K pee-pee extention)

PeterSibley
01-08-2010, 04:56 AM
DtC ,any reason for this cold weather ? What are the ocean temperatures like ? Normal ?

downthecreek
01-08-2010, 05:09 AM
DtC ,any reason for this cold weather ? What are the ocean temperatures like ? Normal ?

Russia! ;)

We seem to be entrapped between two extremely cold continental air masses centred to the north east. High pressure and very stable. It started about 10 days before Christmas and shows little sign of change at present.

The trouble is that the authorities responsible for snow clearance, gritting etc. can't afford to invest too heavily in preparation for an event that is so extremely rare, so we aren't very efficient at dealing with it.

Our winters have, until this year, become very much milder, so this has taken us unawares.

I wish it would go away. :)

PeterSibley
01-08-2010, 05:24 AM
I know about your relatively mild winters from my daughters who worked in the UK a few years ago ,their previous place of employment was Hokaido ...they prefered the colder clime .

I think the lack of snow boarding was a disappointment !

Actually the reason I asked about ocean temperatures is my interest in the continued flow of the Gulf Stream ....that heat engine of Western Europe .I suppose any faltering would be prime time news .

Larks
01-08-2010, 08:16 AM
Crikey Peter, take it easy eh! I reckon you can only bounce so often....

shamus
01-08-2010, 08:23 AM
These folks reckon the gulf stream is over rated:
http://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/res/div/ocp/gs/

Take more care of yourself tomorrow Peter- "yer clumsy ol' git":D

shamus
01-08-2010, 04:17 PM
Two Christmases ago I arrived home on Christmas eve looking forward to a break after a busy month in the Post Office, and noticed that a late calving heifer had dropped a calf near the front fence. The calf was flat on its side, which isn't a good look, so I thought I'd better have a closer look. Climbed through the fence, and when I got near it was obvious the calf had never cleared its nostrils. I was backing away when the heifer decided to charge at me. I kept backing- jumped up and down waving my arms, which stopped her first rush. Then I slipped over in my goddammed city slicker shoes and she drove her head into my ribs and worried me for about ten feet right up to the fence and under the bottom wire- which fortunately was quite high, being an electric fence (off). She gave my ribs a good pounding and hit me in the chin and put a good split in the inside of the mouth in front of the bottom teeth, which collected bits of food every time I tried to eat, all Christmas and new year.

That's what comes of doing things that should be done, at the wrong time, in the wrong gear, and probably the wrong frame of mind. On the plus side I got to lie on the couch and call for cold beer at frequent intervals- to ease the swelling, of course. :)

The Bigfella
01-08-2010, 04:51 PM
Ouch...

Oh yeah... good bit of climate science there too.

Keith Wilson
01-08-2010, 05:03 PM
big mobs of angry Jumping Ants. This makes me appreciate -10F.

Rich Jones
01-08-2010, 05:22 PM
In my younger years, I used to bounce. In the past 3 years , though, I've fallen (skiing) and broke my pelvis, than fell at work and suffered massive, irreparable damage to my left rotor cuff tendons. I now walk around like a 90 year old man, fearful of every step. Although, much to my wife's chigrin, I still ski on occasion.

Shamas, reminds me of the time my 2 year old niece wiggled through the fence around the bull pasture. Her father jumped in and grabbed the child just as the bull started to charge. Soon after that, they started using artifical insemination on the farm. Damn, that bull tasted good!

PeterSibley
01-08-2010, 05:52 PM
Two Christmases ago I arrived home on Christmas eve looking forward to a break after a busy month in the Post Office, and noticed that a late calving heifer had dropped a calf near the front fence. The calf was flat on its side, which isn't a good look, so I thought I'd better have a closer look. Climbed through the fence, and when I got near it was obvious the calf had never cleared its nostrils. I was backing away when the heifer decided to charge at me. I kept backing- jumped up and down waving my arms, which stopped her first rush. Then I slipped over in my goddammed city slicker shoes and she drove her head into my ribs and worried me for about ten feet right up to the fence and under the bottom wire- which fortunately was quite high, being an electric fence (off). She gave my ribs a good pounding and hit me in the chin and put a good split in the inside of the mouth in front of the bottom teeth, which collected bits of food every time I tried to eat, all Christmas and new year.

That's what comes of doing things that should be done, at the wrong time, in the wrong gear, and probably the wrong frame of mind. On the plus side I got to lie on the couch and call for cold beer at frequent intervals- to ease the swelling, of course. :)

Vaguely similar story here except it was a 3 year old daughter between mummy and calf .The cow decided that a 3 year old wasn't a huge threat and just butted her into the creek .:eek::( We saw it from 200 m , amazing how fast you can run sometime .No injuries .

Re the Gulf Stream ,there is definitely no concensis out here on that one .
http://lugar.senate.gov/energy/links/commentary/pdf/02_Yohe.pdf
I hope your bloke is right ...although a brief stoppage of the conveyor would be a good way to see if it's all hot air or not .

Peerie Maa
01-08-2010, 06:03 PM
I think that there is so much momentum in the ocean conveyor that it will stop slowly and over a long time.
The UK met office blames this cold winter on Arctic air flowing down the north sea from the north, when we usually get it from the west. They have published a map indicating where above/below normal winter temperatures are occuring
http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/corporate/pressoffice/2010/images/20100106b-chart.jpg

The low temperatures in the UK have also been accompanied by snow. This is because areas of low pressure have been running in from the north-east, tracking across the North Sea and picking up moisture along the way, which falls as snow.

However, it is not cold everywhere in the world. North-east America, Canada, North Africa, the Mediterranean, and south-west Asia have all seen temperatures above normal in many places by more than 5 C, and in parts of northern Canada, by more than 10 C.From http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/corporate/pressoffice/2010/pr20100106b.html
I think that the underlying problem is that the Jet stream is further south over the Atlantic than normal.

PeterSibley
01-08-2010, 06:06 PM
In my younger years, I used to bounce. In the past 3 years , though, I've fallen (skiing) and broke my pelvis, than fell at work and suffered massive, irreparable damage to my left rotor cuff tendons. I now walk around like a 90 year old man, fearful of every step. Although, much to my wife's chigrin, I still ski on occasion.

Shamas, reminds me of the time my 2 year old niece wiggled through the fence around the bull pasture. Her father jumped in and grabbed the child just as the bull started to charge. Soon after that, they started using artifical insemination on the farm. Damn, that bull tasted good!

Ahh bull pen stories !:D

When I was about 12 years ,in New Zealand I used to play on a friend's dairy farm .Said farm ran jerseys ,sweet little cows with lots of cream in the milk .The bulls are not small or sweet .

This farm ,like most had a bull pen ,a massive construction of old telephone poles and bridge timbers ,about 40 foot long and 15 wide .Inside was the bull ,naturally unhappy but on this farm usually with 10 or so little boys perches on the pen walls .

The game was to drop down and dart across when the bull was at the other end .It would see you spin and charge ,by which time ,if all went well you would be through the rails and out .
This would continue until our squeals of glee attracted the father and we scattered under his abuse ! Until the next time .

Childish pleasures .:rolleyes:

George Jung
01-08-2010, 06:14 PM
Ah, stock cows with calves - that brings back my first lesson in 'do's and don't's of livestock'. We'd not raised cattle - I was just a kid (7 or so), dad instructed me to run the new herd into the yard for feeding, failing to point out I should leave the heifer with the newbie alone. I was determined she was going in; 'sweetie-pie', as I called her (a bit of a misnomer) was determined she wasn't, and that I wasn't getting near her calf. I turned to run, tell dad the problem (he was loading silage from a pit, perhaps 200 feet away, and saw the cow charge, as did my border collie, frantically barking but unable to negotiate the woven wire fence. Apparently small boys fly quite a ways when properly propelled - dad figured 20 or so feet - but he was relieved that I did a tuck and roll, and came up running at full speed. The cow didn't catch me, and I didn't repeat that particular error again.

Good times.

oznabrag
01-08-2010, 06:54 PM
Russia! ;)

We seem to be entrapped between two extremely cold continental air masses centred to the north east. High pressure and very stable. It started about 10 days before Christmas and shows little sign of change at present.

The trouble is that the authorities responsible for snow clearance, gritting etc. can't afford to invest too heavily in preparation for an event that is so extremely rare, so we aren't very efficient at dealing with it.

Our winters have, until this year, become very much milder, so this has taken us unawares.

I wish it would go away. :)

Well, here in Austin, Texas, the temp is expected to hit 14F tonight. The really COLD weather is SOUTH OF US!

That is climate change.

The Bigfella
01-08-2010, 07:00 PM
Well, here in Austin, Texas, the temp is expected to hit 14F tonight. The really COLD weather is SOUTH OF US!

That is climate change.

Actually, it is weather

shamus
01-08-2010, 08:38 PM
I was surprised myself when I tripped over that gulf stream story the other day. I'd always heard it was the major factor. Probably just someone enjoying coming up with a differnt theory. When I think about it though the direction of the wind is the major factor in our maritime climate here- the East Aust current rarely affects us. Map here shows the North Atlantic above or about usual temperatures, from 40N upwards
http://www.eldersweather.com.au/climimage.jsp?i=sstag

PeterSibley
01-08-2010, 09:14 PM
I'm trying mate , unfortunately there is only one sure cure .:D

I'm still working fit , a chippy (carpenter ) and have suvived a lot worse than this in recent years .Wish me Luck !:D