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D Happ
01-05-2010, 10:27 AM
Iím looking for a recommendation for a book on building kitchen cabinets. I'm planning on building the cabinets and was looking for a book. Anybody have a book about building kitchen cabinets they want to part with?
I have a wood shop and have build face frame cabinets before but not kitchen cabinets. Not much difference but I think there are some standard rules that need to be adhered to.
I'd hate to get done and find the dishwasher doesn't fit.

Mrleft8
01-05-2010, 10:30 AM
Measure your DW before you start.
Look up Jim Ledger's thread about building kitchen cabinets (2008 I think). There's an article in FWW a few years back that'll give you a good basic starting point.

Jim Ledger
01-05-2010, 11:32 AM
Here's three threads that have some information. If you have any specific questions, i'd be happy to have a go at them. I'm doing another face frame kitchen now and will post some pictures in the near future.

http://www.woodenboat.com/forum/showthread.php?t=69693



http://www.woodenboatvb.com/vbulleti...ad.php?t=69974



http://www.woodenboat.com/forum/showthread.php?t=71010

Darren McClelland
01-05-2010, 03:05 PM
ther used to be this guy on PBS who built cabinets in a real easy to understand way I used his method to build cabinets it includes face frames basically you build a series of boxes and attach the frames to the front the math and calculations are easy, I will look up the book tonight.

Darren

PS he also had a video out that was a copy of the show early 90s

McMike
01-05-2010, 04:55 PM
Fine Home Building put a good one out, Taunton(sp) Press, I think.

Eric Hvalsoe
01-05-2010, 07:24 PM
Building Your Own Kitchen Cabinets
By Jere Cary
If I'm building house cabinets I often review it to clear my brain.
It is not the most recent publication, but it is so basic and clearly organized it will never be out of date.

SMARTINSEN
01-05-2010, 07:51 PM
Building Your Own Kitchen Cabinets
By Jere Cary
If I'm building house cabinets I often review it to clear my brain.
It is not the most recent publication, but it is so basic and clearly organized it will never be out of date.

Seconded.

That is what I used when I built mine some twenty years ago, and have referred to since then on others. I liked the fact that he provides dust panels between banks of drawers.

Everything that you need to know is here. IMHO.

It is still in print, so he must have done something right. [/URL]This [URL="http://www.amazon.com/Building-Your-Kitchen-Cabinets-Layout-Materials-Construction-Installation/dp/0918804159#reader_0918804159"]link (http://www.amazon.com/Building-Your-Kitchen-Cabinets-Layout-Materials-Construction-Installation/dp/0918804159#reader_0918804159) will give you a preview from Amazon.

oznabrag
01-05-2010, 09:10 PM
Building Your Own Kitchen Cabinets
By Jere Cary
If I'm building house cabinets I often review it to clear my brain.
It is not the most recent publication, but it is so basic and clearly organized it will never be out of date.

+1 more.

Mr. Cary lays it all out, demystifies it, and lets you get on with it.

The comment that it is 'basic' should in no way be construed to mean 'limited' or 'crude'. Cary shows you how to keep the thing square, which is most of the battle and, if you want to make it dressy after that, it's just dirt simple.

A must-have!

Excellent book.

D Happ
01-06-2010, 04:59 PM
Thanks guys, that's what I was looking for.
Do you think I can cut rails and stiles with a 1 1/2hp Porter Cable router?
I know raising the panels looks like crap if you try to raise them without a shaper becasue the cutter is too small, but I'm probably going to use flat panels anyway.

oznabrag
01-06-2010, 05:29 PM
Thanks guys, that's what I was looking for.
Do you think I can cut rails and stiles with a 1 1/2hp Porter Cable router?
I know raising the panels looks like crap if you try to raise them without a shaper becasue the cutter is too small, but I'm probably going to use flat panels anyway.

Yep, that router will do it. Mount it in a table and build a solid fence for it. It'll cut the panels, too. Use a vertical panel-raiser, and take several passes. If you try to raise a panel in one pass, you're just wasting your time and materials. Make sure the last pass is light, but not too light. As I say, it can be done, but if you try to make a living with that set-up you'll starve and die homeless. ;)

D Happ
01-06-2010, 06:14 PM
Oh Yeah..... a verticle panel raising bit....forgot all about that.
Not doing this for a living, just one kitchen for the wife.
I have a 3' x 5' router table and an heavy fence.

Ron Williamson
01-06-2010, 06:15 PM
I've raised plenty of panels with a tablesaw.
I've you've got some experience and a good saw,it's pretty straightforward.
R

oznabrag
01-06-2010, 08:39 PM
Oh Yeah..... a verticle panel raising bit....forgot all about that.
Not doing this for a living, just one kitchen for the wife.
I have a 3' x 5' router table and an heavy fence.

That's a big table!

Seriously, if you don't have your edges jointed dead-straight, a table that size can be a liability.

If you make a couple of wooden springs to keep the work against your fence, you'll be miles ahead.

Best of luck, at least you've got grit! :)

Jim Ledger
01-06-2010, 08:53 PM
A flat panel can look nice with a fraction of the work of a raised panel. Unless raised panels are executed flawlessly, they tend to look like crap. Without a power feeder on a shaper it's difficult to cut them without a lot of mill marks and burning, dangerous too.



http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m193/searover1916/DSCF5508.jpg

http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m193/searover1916/Karphouse039.jpg

chas
01-06-2010, 10:32 PM
"I think there are some standard rules that need to be adhered to."

Here's two:

-The only doors you should have in your base cabinets are the ones under the sinks. (Think full extension drawer slides)

-Don't cover the drawers in a pantry unit with those 5' high doors

Nice winter project, building a kitchen. Good luck.

Jim Ledger
01-07-2010, 12:14 AM
"I think there are some standard rules that need to be adhered to."

Here's two:

-The only doors you should have in your base cabinets are the ones under the sinks. (Think full extension drawer slides)

-Don't cover the drawers in a pantry unit with those 5' high doors



Standard rules? Why do we need standard rules? Guidelines that we can ignore, maybe.

Although drawers for base cabinets are a fine idea, they needn't be used for all situations. Here's two drawer bases flanking a range. The island opposite also has large drawers. The drawer unit to the left of the range is actually the primary dishwasher.



http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m193/searover1916/P1010013-3.jpg


The island that I referred to. The two-drawer unit facing the camera is also a dishwasher


http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m193/searover1916/winter2005-06004.jpg

The door in the center of this picture is a pantry cabinet with drawers covered by a seven foot high door. Drawers might not have worked well in this situation. Refrigerator to the left, wine refrigerator to the right.

http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m193/searover1916/P1010002-5.jpg

Paul Girouard
01-07-2010, 12:38 AM
http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m193/searover1916/P1010013-3.jpg






Nice work Jim.

One question whats the deal with the upper to the left of the stove? I don't see any hinge butts on what appears to be two doors.

Jim Ledger
01-07-2010, 04:39 AM
Nice work Jim.

One question whats the deal with the upper to the left of the stove? I don't see any hinge butts on what appears to be two doors.

Paul, I'm surprised that you didn't notice the air return duct. Oh, well.;)

I had to think about your question because I'd forgotten the reason myself, but here it is. The reason that you can't see the hinges is because they're aren't any. That particular cabinet has a small TV inside, for viewing while sitting at the island. The cabinet doors open and retract out of the way. The retracting mechanism utilizes Euro hinges, as you know, hence, no butts.

Bill Lowe
01-07-2010, 06:19 AM
Nice work Jim, and it reminds me how hard it is to keep things really square and then float them into a room that isn't.

Jim Ledger
01-07-2010, 06:49 AM
You noticed that, Bill? Some of you folks around here know just what to look for. It's getting to the point that you've got to be careful what you post. I'm hoping that old Joe Coldspring doesn't take exception to the proportions else I'll be in some trouble.:D

That part of the house was easily 100 years old, moved at some point on a barge to its present location. The framing could be termed "eclectic", bits of this'n'that, lots of recycled older timbers combined with more than one off-the-cuff alteration. But not the worst I've dealt with by a long shot.

The floor across that refrigerator unit drops an inch in ten feet, IIRC. Which means that the refrigerator is standing on tiptoes while I had to rout grooves in the floor for the wine refrigerator on the other end. Nice neat grooves. It looks easy when its done but takes some thought in the beginning if the panels are to eventually line up.

Pugwash
01-07-2010, 07:54 AM
I'll probably get ostracized for this, but if you have limited work space or a very large number of doors and drawer fronts to make then farming that part of it out can make a lot of sense both financially and organisationally. There are lots of companies out there specialising in making custom cabinet doors.

http://www.royswoodproducts.com/catalog/DoorCAT081117sm.pdf

One example.

Of course, if you're doing it for fun that might be a different story. But I've never found building a butt load of doors fun, particularly when I can get someone to deliver them to my door for $30 a piece.

Maybe I'm just lazy.

:)

D Happ
01-07-2010, 08:03 AM
Nice work Jim, and it reminds me how hard it is to keep things really square and then float them into a room that isn't.

Exactly! And that's the reason for a book. To let out all those little secrets, like.... leave this edge long so you can trace it to the wall that isn't square at installation. The things I wouldn't think of naturally.

D Happ
01-07-2010, 08:06 AM
Beautiful work Jim!!

Jim Ledger
01-07-2010, 08:31 AM
Exactly! And that's the reason for a book. To let out all those little secrets, like.... leave this edge long so you can trace it to the wall that isn't square at installation. The things I wouldn't think of naturally.


Books are good for a start, although I don't look at them much anymore. There's a lot of tricks and techniques that aren't covered in books as well. Maybe I should write one.

Leaving an edge with a scribe allowance is always a good idea. This is a little trick that I use a lot.. Here's a drawer box face frame for a kitchen that I'm working on right now. The wide stile is made wide because the cabinet is close to a door with a deep casing, so extra width is added to keep clearance for the drawers. The rabbetted portion is what goes against the wall. Rabbetting makes the scribing easier because you don't have to cut down the entire thickness of the frame. Very easy to fine tune with a belt sander or block plane. These frames are maple, so that little tongue is quite strong.

http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m193/searover1916/DSCF7628.jpg

MiddleAgesMan
01-07-2010, 08:47 AM
I'll probably get ostracized for this, but if you have limited work space or a very large number of doors and drawer fronts to make then farming that part of it out can make a lot of sense both financially and organisationally. There are lots of companies out there specialising in making custom cabinet doors....


Maybe I'm just lazy.

:)

My thinking exactly. I've made doors and bought doors (and even sold them in vast quantities). I'd buy them in a heart beat if I had another kitchen to do.

Paul Girouard
01-07-2010, 09:25 AM
Maybe I should write one.





I'd buy it! The book that is.

Do you get FWW? If so you undoubtedly saw the article on the work bench in last issue , your thread here and the bench you've made is nicer then the one featured in FWW, IMO.

Pocket door hardware, eh! I didn't think they made it that short, but I see in my Rockler catalog Accuride goes down to 14" in length.

I have a few recent photo's of the kitchen I'm working on,,, sort of with the cabinet shop we use, they've done most of the work , I'm doing some of the bits and pieces, the eating bar wainscot, corbels that support the eating bar and the over oven cabinet/ valance. It's one of those "new" euro exhaust hoods with the triangular shaped hood and SS stack that covers the vent pipe.

It's been interesting. Some time border line frustrating working thru the details with the owners. We're almost "there",thankfully!

I'm hesitant to post any photos though, as I'd get the "blame" for work I didn't do , or proportions / shape / decisions I didn't make.

Not worth the grief.

Paul Girouard
01-07-2010, 10:40 PM
Oh well here goes, the forums to boring tonight!

Eating bar corbels and all Cherry materials milled and finished by our cabinet shop sub.

I made the list , laid out the spacing per the owners request and installed all the bits and pieces.

The granite sub set the counter-top.

http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b299/PEG688/Jan420106.jpg


Grain matched miter, not many notice that sort of thing.

http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b299/PEG688/Jan420107.jpg


Nice "flat" corbels, anyone who installed those knows what thats like off a pony wall thats in part supported by the cabinets.

http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b299/PEG688/Jan420108.jpg

I'm not craze about the shape, but the owners like them.

aarhost
01-10-2018, 04:20 AM
Building Your Own Kitchen Cabinets
By Jere Cary


An excellent guide for the beginner.
While renovating my house I realized I'd need a new kitchen
I saved a fortune by buying a router, table saw, and this book.
I'll never buy a kitchen cabinet again.
This text is designed to help anyone thinking about re-doing their kitchen or building a new one from scratch. It provides information to help you get started and help you do the right job.

Too Little Time
01-10-2018, 10:03 AM
I'll probably get ostracized for this, but if you have limited work space or a very large number of doors and drawer fronts to make then farming that part of it out can make a lot of sense both financially and organisationally. There are lots of companies out there specialising in making custom cabinet doors.
When I redid our kitchen, I found it more cost effective to buy doors and drawers.