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Paul Pless
01-03-2010, 06:23 PM
Has got to be the most annoying program broadcast on NPR.

Blech!

Paul Pless
01-03-2010, 06:24 PM
thanks for listening

Tristan
01-03-2010, 06:24 PM
Sorry Paul, but I love the Lake Woebegon stories.

Phillip Allen
01-03-2010, 06:27 PM
I liked it a bit better 20 years ago...still a good radio variety show

sailboy3
01-03-2010, 06:30 PM
I performed on it once, and Garrison Keillor is incredibly grouchy. It seems like he is becoming more and more immature all the time, i.e.his fondness for fart jokes.

seanz
01-03-2010, 06:31 PM
Noooooo.........don't listen to it! It'll turn you into a li, a lib, a librul...

sailboy3
01-03-2010, 06:31 PM
I liked it a bit better 20 years ago...still a good radio variety show

Exactly.

ripley699
01-03-2010, 06:31 PM
Sailboy,
What is it that you do that found you on this show ?

Phillip Allen
01-03-2010, 06:31 PM
hmmm...

Hwyl
01-03-2010, 06:32 PM
I agree Paul but it's one of the most popular. I heard Rush Limbaugh say something like, when a NPR program reaches a certain critical mass it should be farmed out to commercial radio. One of the few times I've agreed with him. Car Talk should go too.

I'd loe to know how much Keillor makes per annum, I'm guessing he can affort to contribute to a pledge drive.

Phillip Allen
01-03-2010, 06:32 PM
Sailboy,
What is it that you do that found you on this show ?

plays the spoons? :)

pefjr
01-03-2010, 06:33 PM
I love it, the movie is even better.

sailboy3
01-03-2010, 06:33 PM
No, I play the fiddle :).

Phillip Allen
01-03-2010, 06:35 PM
No, I play the fiddle :).

alright! I love the fiddle!

(do Tom and Jerry for us)

Keith Wilson
01-03-2010, 06:36 PM
If you don't like it, don't listen to it. BTW, Garrison Keilor has had the reputation for many years of being a seriously odd guy in person.

Hwyl
01-03-2010, 06:40 PM
The problem is Keith that I suspect a major par of my membership goes to supporting him, and in Maine at least, MPBN thrives on ignoring it's members.

Ian McColgin
01-03-2010, 06:49 PM
Whenever I'm making a check I try to seperate my dismay at our local NPR station's programming rationals from my support of a number of syndicated programs, Prairie Home Companion high among them.

Keith Wilson
01-03-2010, 06:53 PM
The problem is Keith that I suspect a major part of my membership goes to supporting himI expect the Prairie Home Companion is largely self-supporting. They sell a lot of tickets and CDs and other stuff.

Phillip Allen
01-03-2010, 06:54 PM
He IS expencive...does a better job than I could so it's okay

Hwyl
01-03-2010, 06:56 PM
Considering the part of the country he inhabits, this is to be expected.



I believe he lives in New York.

Phillip Allen
01-03-2010, 06:56 PM
Considering the part of the country he inhabits, this is to be expected.

I really liked him in the old days, before he became an LWW. Some of the Woebegone segments were pure genius, especially when they dealt with mud puddles.

I've also experienced his egotistical side, and watched him crudely insult customers and booksellers on numerous occasions. I once helped the buyer/manager of the biggest bookstore in Madison protect him from being beaten to a pulp by a customer he verbally abused.

that the trouble with liberals...they tend to have a Messiah complex

seanz
01-03-2010, 06:58 PM
that the trouble with liberals...they tend to have a Masiah complex

Meh........

Phillip Allen
01-03-2010, 07:00 PM
speeling ain't important...it's intent what counts...been told that along with what my motives are for years here

PeterSibley
01-03-2010, 07:00 PM
Masiah ? Maria ?

Phillip Allen
01-03-2010, 07:02 PM
MESSIAH!!!

there, it has risen indeed

seafox
01-03-2010, 07:05 PM
about 60 percent is good and40 percent bad so I guess its worth listening to. and the music choices are some of the best and the worst I've ever heard

my nonination for very worst npr show is the diane reams ( god I just speeled it and hope she isn't a cousan!!!) show has the neatest guests but her voice and slow talking is like nails on a blackboard crossed with chinese water torture
jeff
btw you can listen to the enemy on npr and not become a liberal

Hwyl
01-03-2010, 07:06 PM
Is that refutation, or agreement?:p

He actually lives in Manhattan, so I think we can agree.

Phillip Allen
01-03-2010, 07:09 PM
He actually lives in Manhattan, so I think we can agree.

doesn't that indicate he's getting paid enough? (he keeps going down to the Algonquin but nobody waited for him...)

Hwyl
01-03-2010, 07:18 PM
I found that their News anchors make $300K. I'm sure GK makes in excess of that.

http://newsbusters.org/blogs/tim-graham/2008/12/12/those-soft-voiced-anchors-npr-make-big-bucks

elf
01-03-2010, 07:35 PM
The show fell apart when Butch Thompson was forced out.

Phillip Allen
01-03-2010, 07:39 PM
forced out?

Tristan
01-03-2010, 08:13 PM
about 60 percent is good and40 percent bad so I guess its worth listening to. and the music choices are some of the best and the worst I've ever heard

my nonination for very worst npr show is the diane reams ( god I just speeled it and hope she isn't a cousan!!!) show has the neatest guests but her voice and slow talking is like nails on a blackboard crossed with chinese water torture
jeff
btw you can listen to the enemy on npr and not become a liberal

I used to feel the same about the Daine Rehm show but I finally realize she must be handicapped. Actually she developed spasmodic dysphonia, a condition which results in a strained, abnormal voice. Now I feel she deserves a lot of credit for hanging in there with such a handicap. Plus, she's a very smart lady.

elf
01-03-2010, 08:33 PM
If every pundit were as well prepared and willing to bring up sore subjects as Diane Rehm, we might approach having a viable society. My only issue with her is that she rarely reaches outside the Beltway.

Tristan
01-03-2010, 08:37 PM
If every pundit were as well prepared and willing to bring up sore subjects as Diane Rehm, we might approach having a viable society . . ..

Amen!

Davy Jones
01-03-2010, 08:46 PM
I like "A" prairie home companion for the most part but garrisons singing, :eek: Please make it stop mommy!! The stories crack me up as does the sound effect guy. Seems we are always on a Sunday drive when it is on the air.

sailboy3
01-03-2010, 08:58 PM
BTW it's "A Prairie Home Companion not "The Prairie Home Companion".

Keith Wilson
01-03-2010, 09:06 PM
The other is one of the few places on earth which is both geographically and politically left of the UWS; St. Paul.Eh? Hardly. Some neighborhoods, maybe. You'd have to go to Berkeley for that. I was a conservative in Berkeley (not that it's difficult).

He does own a pretty good bookstore in St. Paul which I guarantee isn't making him any money; not that he really needs more. Donn, your experience is much like what I've heard.

I think everybody wishes he wouldn't sing.

Mrleft8
01-03-2010, 09:09 PM
".....Welcome to the Wooden Boat Forum...... Where all the women are strong, all the men are good looking, and alllllll the children are above average..... (If they're yours, otherwise they're twisted psychopaths....).... Brought to you tonight by Black powder milk biscuits....MY THEY'RE TASTEY! AND OH SO DEADLY TOO! Also by EGOS.... THE BEST THING THAT HAPPENED TO YOU IN............... WELL.......... FOREVER!...":D

elf
01-03-2010, 09:17 PM
He's 67 last August. Most people stop singing by then. He's hanging on by a thread. I predict the show will end in the next 24 months.

Lew Barrett
01-03-2010, 09:52 PM
Regarding Keeler's singing, can we say Self Indulgent? The show is well past it's sell by date.

Captain Blight
01-03-2010, 10:03 PM
Pariah?
<<sings>> they call your whinge, Pariah...
<<ducks>>

Captain Blight
01-03-2010, 10:05 PM
I think everybody wishes he wouldn't sing.Oh my dear Lloyd yes. I wish he'd get his adenoids fixed, too.

Mrleft8
01-03-2010, 10:10 PM
He's 67 last August. Most people stop singing by then. He's hanging on by a thread. I predict the show will end in the next 24 months.

I predict you will still be short in the next 24 months.;)

huisjen
01-03-2010, 10:41 PM
"And even though Click and Clack say, 'what is this dreck?' when they hear Garrison sing, this is National Public Radio..."

elf
01-03-2010, 10:43 PM
The News is certainly well by its sell-by date, and the guest performers lack considerable variety. He must not pay enough or something.

Lew Barrett
01-03-2010, 10:53 PM
If they pay much of anything at all to most of the guests.
I'm with you and you're with me, E. Show's a loser and should have been scrapped five years ago.
Maybe he's just running out the contract and going for the dough. The audience for this sort of stuff cannot be getting younger!

J P
01-03-2010, 10:53 PM
I just wish they'd do something about the harsh sibilance of his voice; there's plenty of technology available to work with that. Maybe it's my ears, but it's almost like they enhance those "ssss 's" on the broadcast audio.

bobbys
01-03-2010, 11:01 PM
I have never heard the show.

I do not get many stations and with Rush, . Laura Ingraham, and Lars Larson why listen to anything else!

Wayne Jeffers
01-03-2010, 11:02 PM
I saw the show (The Rhubarb Tour) at the West Virginia State Fair a couple of years ago.

I’m not much of a fan of the radio show (my wife loves it) but the live show was good. During one of the segments that Garrison Keillor did (Lake Woebegone) I laughed harder than at any other time in my life.

Wayne

Phillip Allen
01-03-2010, 11:36 PM
He's 67 last August. Most people stop singing by then. He's hanging on by a thread. I predict the show will end in the next 24 months.

Emily...he never STARTED singing in the first place...I have alwys thought his flat rumble was meant to be a joke...

elf
01-03-2010, 11:42 PM
I have never heard the show.

I do not get many stations and with Rush, . Laura Ingraham, and Lars Larson why listen to anything else!

You'll never know 'til you try.

Glen Longino
01-03-2010, 11:56 PM
I've spent most of my life on the Great Plains.
There is much similar between the Prairie and the Plains, and I got a kick out of Keelor and his drivel....er, I mean, stories.
But I never got a kick out of any of his songs.
If he's not a dinosaur, he's at least a wooly mammoth!

pcford
01-03-2010, 11:58 PM
You guys are bitching about Diane Rehm and Garrison Keillor yet you hang out with the likes of jbelow, Squeeky (©Meerkat) AKA Donn and Phillip Allen.

Keillor ain't so bad I reckon.

Glen Longino
01-04-2010, 12:10 AM
You guys are bitching about Diane Rehm and Garrison Keillor yet you hang out with the likes of jbelow, Squeeky (©Meerkat) AKA Donn and Phillip Allen.

Keillor ain't so bad I reckon.

If jbelow starts singing, I'll quit hanging out with him!
I think he knows that, which is why he's never sung to us.
Right, Jay?:)

C. Ross
01-04-2010, 12:23 AM
Keillor sold this house in St. Paul last year

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_61djkGwfEZo/R8wLyAxEjNI/AAAAAAAAB8s/28Xqys4ZiUU/s400/Keillor_PICS.jpg

and bought this one four blocks away


http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4051/4243006089_7d0a857099.jpg


Gareth is right that he also owns a townhouse in Manhattan, but probably not accurate to say he "lives" there. He has a daughter who's about the same age as my youngest, and she attends a school in St. Paul. (It's kind of a small town, and everybody knows somebody around here...)

Donn is right about St. Paul's politics.

Everyone is right that Garrison should stop singing.

George Jung
01-04-2010, 01:07 AM
You and Keith don't seem to agree on the local political pulse; surprising, wouldn't you say?:D

bobbys
01-04-2010, 01:08 AM
You'll never know 'til you try..

O, i would have liked to hear him, One time Chet Atkins was on, Thats pretty cool.

I live on the Oregon coast and the reception is such my radios do not get many stations..

I only get 2 AM stations, A few FM but they fade in and out.

My son bought me XM and i had it for a couple of months but he took it back..

When he goes fishing to Alaska i will have his truck with Sirrus radio and hope to listen to Howard Stern,

I never have heard him either..

When i had XM i just had 50s and 60s music on ..

Even had dead spots here with XM though

C. Ross
01-04-2010, 01:24 AM
You and Keith don't seem to agree on the local political pulse; surprising, wouldn't you say?:D

Keith lives in the 'burbs, I live in the heart of darkness.

Old Sailor
01-04-2010, 07:44 AM
I like the music for the most part. I'll say one thing for his singing....he can harmonize.
Old Sailor

Peter Kalshoven
01-04-2010, 08:51 AM
The problem is Keith that I suspect a major par of my membership goes to supporting him, and in Maine at least, MPBN thrives on ignoring it's members.

I live just over the line in SC, but in the Charlotte Metro area. There is a NC Public Radio Station that has lots of wattage, and all the standard NPR fare. There used to be a great Jazz station on SC public radio out of Rock Hill, SC. My car radio was pretty well locked in to it.
Suddenly, one Monday, I turn on my car to hear the same old canned NPR morning shows. It turns out that SC Radio decided that they "felt the need to enlighten the folks of Rock Hill" and changed the format... right after a fund drive for the Jazz programming. I talked to the programing exec, and he arrogantly told me that they had made a decision that this programing "was needed to educate the folks in Rock Hill"... Which translated that the presidential elections were coming up, and Rock Hill tends to be a fairly conservative town. More importantly, they could quit paying the talented staff in Rock Hill, and put in a repeater station, and Save Money.
His final argument was that Rock Hill needed access to more Local NPR programing. The problem with this is that folks in this area consider themselves part of the Charlotte Metro Area; If you want to listen to NPR, you were already listening to the Charlotte station.
But despite lots of protests, they killed our Jazz stations.
Bastards.

elf
01-04-2010, 09:04 AM
.

O, i would have liked to hear him, One time Chet Atkins was on, Thats pretty cool.

Chet was on for about 8 months, intermittently, just before the show quit the first time back in 1987 or '88. He and Jeannie Redpath were the spine of the show after Butch got forced out and the rest of the regulars wandered away.

In my opinion, the show's never recovered since then.

elf
01-04-2010, 11:02 AM
Emily...he never STARTED singing in the first place...I have alwys thought his flat rumble was meant to be a joke...

In musical terminology, Phillip, Keillor is a high baritone with a strong head tone. He's definitely always had a weak deep bass, struggling for those low notes he likes to sing.

In addition, his ability to sing in tune is better than average. Keillor carries a tune correctly and improvises harmonies accurately as well.

So his voice is neither flat nor a rumble from a musical perspective.

Sorry.

elf
01-04-2010, 11:04 AM
I just wish they'd do something about the harsh sibilance of his voice; there's plenty of technology available to work with that. Maybe it's my ears, but it's almost like they enhance those "ssss 's" on the broadcast audio.

Get better speakers. I find no problem with his sibilants and I've been living with music and broadcast music for 67 years. You're imagining things.

elf
01-04-2010, 11:10 AM
I have never heard the show.

I do not get many stations and with Rush, Laura Ingraham and Lars Larson why listen to anything else!

You've got a computer. Not having access when you have a computer is no excuse.

try this:
http://wamu.org/programs/schedule/
Click on listen live near the top on the left side.

Lew Barrett
01-04-2010, 12:07 PM
I find his speaking voice generally pleasant, and his monologs relaxing to listen to in an odd sort of way. That is except for his tendency to breathy wheezing (which I put up to a possible or former smoking habit?) but I draw the line in respect to what I like about his vocalizations there.

NPR, and that includes PHC, has some of the very best recorded and broadcast sound on radio, maybe the best. Individual stations may or may not be as proficient at delivering the goods, but as a rule their standards exceed those of even the best commercial broadcasts, so it's not as if they don't have the equipment to get the job done.

Nope....it's his singing I can't abide. And as much as we've agreed on this thread dear Elf, I don't think his technical abilities are very slick at all. Hold a tune? Maybe. Good singer? Not hardly! So just where is it that he does fall down? Choice of material? Insistence on singing duets with other, better singers? Phrasing? Balance and sensitivity? I don't know...he's just awful!

Nice taste in housing though! I don't resent his success; there was a time when his style of radio was innovative, fresh and funny. That time has passed!

huisjen
01-04-2010, 04:50 PM
His writing is getting clichéd too. He's a caracature of himself.

Dan

J P
01-04-2010, 05:40 PM
Get better speakers. I find no problem with his sibilants and I've been living with music and broadcast music for 67 years. You're imagining things.

Well, maybe my ears will improve with more experience. There’s always better speakers (really my old Klipsch’s aren’t THAT bad) but it doesn’t seem to matter what system I’m listening on, his sss’s often have a high pitched whistling kind of sound to me; makes me cringe like scratching a chalkboard. Might well just be my imagination but it’s the only one I’ve got.

Lew has pretty much described how I feel about GK’s singing, but since just about anyone’s singing is a thousand times better than my own, I usually try to refrain from commenting negatively about someone else’s voice ... Has GK and Kottke ever done a vocal duet on the show? Talk about “geese farts on a muggy day”.


I enjoy the PHC show though.




"Get better speakers." That would really simplify things for audio engineers now wouldn't it? :)

J P
01-04-2010, 06:08 PM
I much prefer Leo's voice to Garrison's, and if both were struck mute, Leo can still pick far better than Garrison could ever write.

I prefer Leo's voice too. Especially speaking. :D I've found that in his performances just listening to his wonderful voice telling those odd little stories between tunes is one of the most enjoyable parts of the show.

elf
01-04-2010, 06:18 PM
Kottke, in my not humble at all opinion, is a member of the "crotch-scratch" group of folk instrumentalists. Mark O'Connor is a great representative of that tradition on the fiddle and Tony Trishka is one on the banjo. They have limited skills, can only play in a couple keys and have a very limited style of improvisation.

Their work is about as interesting as Jerry Garcia's improvs on reverb.

Introversion is the primary characteristic of it - a complete loss of sense of context permeates what they're doing and they have no idea of when enough is enough.

Doc Watson, on the other hand, is tied into the tradition so tightly that it would never occur to him to wander around the guitar looking to show off how many notes he can play.

J P
01-04-2010, 06:39 PM
Oh, to be so limited!


So which two keys do these crotch-scratchers pick in?

Joe (SoCal)
01-04-2010, 06:40 PM
You're entitled to your opinion, elf, even if it is wrong.

Don{n} is an admitted fan of Mark Levin :rolleyes: who's speaking voice is akin to a screaming Cartman from South Park :eek::eek:. He actually has a "Rant of the day" On WABC.

http://www.wabcradio.com/sectional.asp?id=34043

The guys voice is the equivalent of drinking battery acid. :eek: Talk about the angry right wing nut job. Ill take Garrison Keillor's melodic voice any day.

Bill Lowe
01-04-2010, 07:01 PM
I still enjoy it, especially sitting out back at the campfire, but then I am past my sell date also.

Bob Cleek
01-04-2010, 07:41 PM
PHC is harmless enough, but not my favorite. It can have its funny moments, but it suffers from Keilor's egomania. It seems like nobody but the host ever gets a line that's worth a laugh. I can't shake the mental image of Keilor's real off-mike persona being a gutter-mouth spewing a string of really filthy jokes. He's really ripe for one of those "Oops! I didn't know the mike was on!" career-ending bloopers, but it is probably so edited that'll never happen. Keilor is probably bulletproof. Sort of a male version of Martha Stewart without a stock portfolio. He'll be a PBS staple until he's caught in bed with either a dead girl or a live boy.

My favorite PBS programming is the pledge breaks. It's so much fun to listen to those oh-so-full-of-themselves people "reminding" me that I "owe" them a donation because I listen to PBS and NOT pledging! It's such a deliciously politically incorrect thing to do. About the only chance I get to express my "dark side." I used to send them a few bucks way back when it was "commercial-free educational television," but they lost me when they started fudging on the commercials. I don't care if they tell you "This program was made possible by the following DONORS...", when that's followed by that Black guy telling me to buy Allstate Insurance, it's a fooking commercial any way you cut it. Their shows used to be a full half hour or hour or whatever. Ever notice how the hour shows now all end after only fifty minutes or so, and then you get ten minutes of self-advertisements for PBS until the next one starts? They're saving time so the stuff can be resold to commercial broadcasters who will plug in even more commercials.

It's pretty amazing that so many people will put money in the mail just because some guy on radio or TV tells them they have an obligation to do so. PBS Pledge breaks are sort of like "Reverend Ike" for atheists. If you don't believe in God, I guess you have to send your money to SOMEBODY asking for it over the airwaves.

pefjr
01-04-2010, 07:52 PM
.

O, i would have liked to hear him, One time Chet Atkins was on, Thats pretty cool.
Try this

http://prairiehome.publicradio.org/

elf
01-04-2010, 08:39 PM
PHC is harmless enough, but not my favorite. It can have its funny moments, but it suffers from Keilor's egomania. It seems like nobody but the host ever gets a line that's worth a laugh. I can't shake the mental image of Keilor's real off-mike persona being a gutter-mouth spewing a string of really filthy jokes. He's really ripe for one of those "Oops! I didn't know the mike was on!" career-ending bloopers, but it is probably so edited that'll never happen. Keilor is probably bulletproof. Sort of a male version of Martha Stewart without a stock portfolio. He'll be a PBS staple until he's caught in bed with either a dead girl or a live boy.I can't imagine how you reconcile your mental image with the show, since the show is broadcast live.

In addition, I believe he lost no audience when he dumped Margaret Moos for his high school exchange student from Norway, and then dumped her for his current wife.


My favorite PBS programming is the pledge breaks. It's so much fun to listen to those oh-so-full-of-themselves people "reminding" me that I "owe" them a donation because I listen to PBS and NOT pledging! It's such a deliciously politically incorrect thing to do. About the only chance I get to express my "dark side." You're missing this post, Bob. If your donations are inspired by your idea of political correctness, you'd have to join the people who do donate.
Ever notice how the hour shows now all end after only fifty minutes or so, and then you get ten minutes of self-advertisements for PBS until the next one starts? Ever notice how "public" radio and television has been cut to the bone in Congress during the last 35 years? Favorite Republican bugabear - they just love pretending that the Democrats are still funding NPR and APR.

C. Ross
01-04-2010, 09:13 PM
The Kottke vs. Watson debate aside, the main reason why I turn on PHC anymore is the music.

In December they had Punch Brothers, Heather Masse, The Klezmatics, Yo Yo Ma, the Assad Brothers, Inga Swearingen, Connie Evingson, Norah Jones, Madeline Peyroux, Russian Chamber Chorus of New York, Renee Fleming and Boys of the Lough.

Not many places where you can tune in and hear somebody you love doing something weird, or someone weird doing something you love.

Now, if you want to really hear what Public Radio can do, try the live stream of The Current (http://minnesota.publicradio.org/radio/services/the_current/streams.shtml). Here's a C&P of their playlist for the last few hours. Not a note of Pachebel or Ferde Grofe to be heard here...

Artic Monkeys Cornerstone
Desdamona I Don't Stop
Jonsi Boy Lilikoi
Doves Winter Hill Broken Bells The High Road
Bob Marley and The Wailers Buffalo Soldier
Lissie Little Lovin'
Blakroc Hope You're Happy feat. Q-Tip, Billy Danze and Nicole Wray

The Big Pink Velvet
Lookbook The Only Ones
The Clash Straight To Hell
Harper Simon Wishes and Stars
The Magnetic Fields Papa Was a Rodeo
Kid Dakota Ten Thousand Lakes
Deep Purple Highway Star
Them Crooked Vultures New Fang
The Rural Alberta Advantage Drain The Blood
Retribution Gospel Choir Hide It Away
The Avett Brothers Laundry Room
Peter Bjorn And John Young Folks
Peter Wolf Crier Crutch and Cane
Anya Marina Satellite Heart
Jolie Holland Your Big Hands
Death Cab For Cutie Meet Me On The Equinox
Romantica Don't Let It Fall
Beck Tropicalia
The Clientele I Wonder Who We Are
Surfer Blood Floating Vibes
The Heavy How You Like Me Now?
Beth Orton Central Reservation Orbit Mix
Dan Wilson Against History
Edward Sharpe and The Magnetic Zeros Carries On
Justin Townes Earle Can't Hardly Wait
Art Brut The Replacements
Phantogram When I'm Small
Sweet Wig-Wam Bam
Free Energy Dream City
Stereolab Percolator
Yeasayer Ambling Alp
Gang of Four I Love a Man in a Uniform

pefjr
01-04-2010, 10:27 PM
Kottke, in my not humble at all opinion, is a member of the "crotch-scratch" group of folk instrumentalists. Mark O'Connor is a great representative of that tradition on the fiddle and Tony Trishka is one on the banjo. They have limited skills, can only play in a couple keys and have a very limited style of improvisation.

Their work is about as interesting as Jerry Garcia's improvs on reverb.

Introversion is the primary characteristic of it - a complete loss of sense of context permeates what they're doing and they have no idea of when enough is enough.

Doc Watson, on the other hand, is tied into the tradition so tightly that it would never occur to him to wander around the guitar looking to show off how many notes he can play.Wow, that's awfully critical for a WBF spell checker. I didn't want to hurt your feelings but since you attacked 3 of my favorites I have to mention that you have never corrected my spelling with any kind of style or grace. Just awkward stumbling, and with no athleticism
at all.:D

elf
01-04-2010, 10:55 PM
Wow, that's awfully critical for a WBF spell checker. I didn't want to hurt your feelings but since you attacked 3 of my favorites I have to mention that you have never corrected my spelling with any kind of style or grace. Just awkward stumbling, and with no athleticism
at all.:D

Sorry, jr. I'll watch for an opportunity to apply more style and grace to my corrections from now on. :D:D

TimmS
01-04-2010, 11:36 PM
I listen, I love it. So do many of smartest and nicest people I have ever met.

J P
01-05-2010, 01:07 AM
... in my not humble at all opinion ...

I imagine sitting down for a little improv jam session with Mr. O'Connor (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_O%27Connor) could fix that. :rolleyes:;)

yzer
01-05-2010, 02:29 AM
PHC is carried by a heck of a lot of public radio stations but it hasn't been an NPR program since the early eighties. Keillor began the show on Minnesota Public Radio, then it was then carried by NPR. In '82 or so Keillor and his producers saw the opportunity to make a lot more "non-profit" by splitting off of NPR. They joined Minnesota Public Radio in establishing American Public Radio for distribution of PHC and other popular ex-NPR programs. APR eventually becamer Public Radio International. PRI became American Public Media about five years ago of which Minnesota Public Radio is now a subsidiary.

Outside of the NPR news bookends All Things Considered and Morning Edition, PHC is still one of the biggest money makers in Pubic Radio. The show was way past it's prime fifteen years ago but the aging NPR market still pledges the big bucks whenever PHC runs during a fund drive.

Sam F
01-05-2010, 09:45 AM
Here's what PHC was best for:

Leo Kottke and Chet Atkins doing 'Sleepwalk' (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f5oExc78IKE&feature=related)

A very nice blast from the past - thanks Donn!

Sam F
01-05-2010, 09:50 AM
Has got to be the most annoying program broadcast on NPR.

Well Paul you're setting a high bar there! National Propaganda Radio has got some perfectly awful programs.
But Garrison Keillor is without doubt dreadful - the variety part of the show is great however.

TomF
01-05-2010, 10:31 AM
Keith lives in the 'burbs, I live in the heart of darkness.There's a cultural distinction between those two out in St. Paul?

The Gentleman Sawyer
01-05-2010, 10:13 PM
Kottke, in my not humble at all opinion, is a member of the "crotch-scratch" group of folk instrumentalists. Mark O'Connor is a great representative of that tradition on the fiddle and Tony Trishka is one on the banjo. They have limited skills, can only play in a couple keys and have a very limited style of improvisation.

Their work is about as interesting as Jerry Garcia's improvs on reverb.

Introversion is the primary characteristic of it - a complete loss of sense of context permeates what they're doing and they have no idea of when enough is enough.

Doc Watson, on the other hand, is tied into the tradition so tightly that it would never occur to him to wander around the guitar looking to show off how many notes he can play.

This is a joke right? You've obviously never perused much of Doc's work or learned that not only is Mark a virtuoso violinist, he's also a virtuoso guitar player. He was a much in demand studio musician for his finger picking long before he was recognized for his violin skills. Apparently it doesn't bother Yo Yo Ma to play with "crotch scratchers": http://www.amazon.com/Appalachian-Journey-Edgar-Meyer/dp/B00004S38H/ref=sr_1_7?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1262747277&sr=8-7. Does this make Allison Krause a "crotch scratcher" too?

Ken

elf
01-05-2010, 11:47 PM
No, I'm not kidding. I'm just not impressed with lots of notes, and an inability to modulate or build a musical structure while pretending to be a composer.

pefjr
01-06-2010, 12:05 AM
This is a joke right? You've obviously never perused much of Doc's work or learned that not only is Mark a virtuoso violinist, he's also a virtuoso guitar player. He was a much in demand studio musician for his finger picking long before he was recognized for his violin skills. Apparently it doesn't bother Yo Yo Ma to play with "crotch scratchers": http://www.amazon.com/Appalachian-Journey-Edgar-Meyer/dp/B00004S38H/ref=sr_1_7?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1262747277&sr=8-7. Does this make Allison Krause a "crotch scratcher" too?

KenDifferent ear. My son is a musical genius, a jazz professional guitarist here in LV. He agrees with elf. His ear for music is different. He hears things musically that I don't recognize. Good popular music to me is boring to him. I think its ear intelligence and music has to be challenging to his ear to be satisfying.

Keith Wilson
01-06-2010, 12:13 AM
There's a cultural distinction between those two out in St. Paul?Yeah, although Chris exaggerates; I'm less than half a mile from the St. Paul border. The inner-ring suburbs are very much like the city proper. Suburbs get more conservative as you go away from the city (generally; there are exceptions), and the exurbs tend to attract huntin'-and-fishin' NRA members. There is considerable variation between neighborhoods within the city too; St. Paul has an enormous east side that the upper-middle class folks in Highland Park and Mac-Groveland tend to forget exists (just tweaking Chris here). I'm speaking of the whole metropolitan area BTW; differences between Minneapolis and St. Paul get smaller all the time.

Captain Blight
01-06-2010, 12:23 AM
Anyway, you both live in the circle of air and light, and I'm relegated to the One True Scorpion Pit of Despair in DT MPLS. Urban Blight, LOL.

I've always loved how the main drag through the East Side is a street called Payne. Pain a-plenty to be had down that corridor.

C. Ross
01-06-2010, 07:59 AM
St. Paul has an enormous east side that the upper-middle class folks in Highland Park and Mac-Groveland tend to forget exists (just tweaking Chris here).

I wouldn't know about Highland Park or Mac-Groveland myopia. I live in Crocus Hill where we take noblesse oblige seriously. ;)

elf
01-06-2010, 10:34 AM
This is a joke right? You've obviously never perused much of Doc's work or learned that not only is Mark a virtuoso violinist, he's also a virtuoso guitar player. He was a much in demand studio musician for his finger picking long before he was recognized for his violin skills. Apparently it doesn't bother Yo Yo Ma to play with "crotch scratchers": http://www.amazon.com/Appalachian-Journey-Edgar-Meyer/dp/B00004S38H/ref=sr_1_7?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1262747277&sr=8-7. Does this make Allison Krause a "crotch scratcher" too?

Ken

Incidentally, you've misinterpreted my opinion about Doc.

There is a deep and sustaining tradition of improvisation in the kind of music these folks play. Melody is traditionally improvised on a harmonic progression, and that progression of chords has a relatively rigid time frame - 8 or 16 bars, or in the case of the classic blues, 12 bars. In solo improv good players try to imply the cadential moments in that progression and although they may stall a cadence here and there, the best if them don't do it for more than 2-3 bars.

When it goes on for half the piece, as in Garcia's guitar improvs or Leo's noodlings, it loses all connection to its source. When it never gets to the dominant for an entire movement, like O'Connor, then it's just crotch scratching.

If you want to admire a brilliant picker, song writer and multi-instrumentalist, admire Tim O'Brien.

And the only time I've seen Alison Krauss she was 16 years old and impressive as hell, and did not abandon her roots, but the bits I've heard of her record with Robert Plant were quite impressive as well.

if you listen carefully to Stairway to Heaven, speaking of Plant, you'll see the same problem. The intro is absolutly superior composition, when they up the electric and get going, it starts to come apart, but the big improv section falls apart because they abandon the metric basis for the text and can't get past the tonic.

As for Yo Yo, when he was a kid at Harvard the entire department was terrified of his brilliance and basically wondering what they were doing wallowing around in academia. The part of him that flows from that kid is unrivalled - his Bach is still the standard, even though there are at least 5 'cellists from the historically informed performance sphere who have recorded the music completely convincingly. However, his lifetime committment to outreach across varied musics is admired, but hardly any have attempted to do the same in their own lives and none has succeeded as he has.

The precipice between the "classical" music world and the more "popular" world is really easy to fall over, and if you do you go splat.

schlaboatnic
01-06-2010, 11:04 AM
I have listened to PHC for years. It does seem to be getting more on the corny side of humor. Loved the movie. Lately, we have taken to The Vinyl Cafe with Stuart McLean. Even gettign the podcast thingy figured out. It's on CBC radio 2, which we can pick up here in the PNW. For my money, CBC2 is the best radio station out there.

Keith Wilson
01-06-2010, 11:07 AM
I live in Crocus Hill where we take noblesse oblige seriously.:D Yeah, you're right there - petit bourgeoises live west of Lexington.

pefjr
01-06-2010, 11:08 AM
And then there is Jazz.

J P
01-06-2010, 12:23 PM
and jazz snobbery

:)

pefjr
01-06-2010, 12:28 PM
And jazzy blues, and bluezy jazz.

The Gentleman Sawyer
01-06-2010, 01:28 PM
Elf, you are absolutely right about Tim O'brien. I was lucky enough to see him last month in a very small theater that seats about 250. He had a mandolin workshop the next morning for about 15. I told him after the show that, in addition to how much I enjoyed his music that he was a brave man to tell a group of East Tennesseers that he had voted for Ralph Nader and John Kerry! He told me that he's going to be on tour with Mark Knoffler this spring after a winter trip to Scotland. He also regularly sits in with Nashville area Celtic musicians at one of the local pubs.

Ken

bamamick
01-06-2010, 09:17 PM
I am sorry to disagree with so many, but I like the Prarie Home Companion. It's not that there's anything that special about it any more. Honestly, if you've heard it once you've pretty much heard it 1000 times. It's just sort of like a church service to me. It gives me comfort. It connects me to something that I used to be and still am to some degree: an innocent soul just looking around at the world.

Maybe it's that I just started listening to Keillor when I was in my early twenties and there was so much going on in my life, but for some reason the Praire Home Companion has always been a sort of lifeline, something that has remained constant when so many other things in my life have not. I will miss it when it signs off for good.

Mickey Lake