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J. Dillon
12-27-2009, 11:02 PM
Saw the movie Invictus. A lot of Rugby was played. A pretty rough sport to say the least. No protection at all for each player.
One of the situations involved a "Scrum" described as such:

The Scrum

http://www.woodenboat.com/forum/images/rugby-scrum.jpgVery often a player will lose the ball forward during a tackle or just while running and receiving a pass, thus knocking-on. If the ball is quickly picked up by the other team, the referee will let play continue to allow the recovering team to take advantage of the mistake. If no advantage occurs, then the referee will whistle for a scrum to be set at a spot he indicates on the pitch also called a mark. The team that did not lose the ball is awarded the ball to put into the scrum. A scrum is also awarded whenever a pass is made in which the ball goes forward.

The typical procedure of scrummaging involves each set of front row players binding and the hookers calling for the locks to join the formation. The flankers join on each side of the locks setting their shoulders below a prop's outside buttock. The No. 8 joins at the back between the hips of the two locks. While this is occurring the captain of the forwards can be calling a move while the backs are shouting out code words signalling what move they will be running. The forward pack with the put in is then allowed the courtesy of initiating the coming together of the scrum. Upon a prearranged signal between the hooker and scrumhalf, the scrumhalf will roll the ball into the tunnel underneath the two locked together front rows. Each of the hookers will then attempt to push the ball behind him with a sweep of his foot. All of this is occurring while each pack is attempting to push the other backwards driving themselves over the ball.

If the ball is won cleanly, most often the scrumhalf will run to the back of the scrum to retrieve the ball from in front of the No. 8's feet and pass it to the backs, to a breaking loose forward, or make a run or kick of his own. The opposing scrumhalf will follow looking for a chance to snap up any loose ball. The No. 8 may also decide to pick up the ball himself, and start a back row move from the back or base of the scrum.

One exciting aspect of scrummaging is the pushover try. A pushover try is scored when a scrum is set close to the attacking tryline. The attacking scrum will keep the ball at the No. 8's feet driving the defending pack backwards across the tryline. Once the ball has been dragged across the tryline, the No. 8 or scrumhalf will touch the ball down for the try.

Can any one here put this in simple language ?

Near the end of the flick a prolonged scrum occured in which the ball emerged from the two opposing teams. What was happening and how did the ball do this ?

confused JD:confused:

Tom Montgomery
12-27-2009, 11:17 PM
You've got me. But I once saw a bumper sticker that proclaimed, "Rugby players eat their young."

ripley699
12-27-2009, 11:19 PM
I don't know the answer but I bet it involves Gronhicles !

RIP

oznabrag
12-28-2009, 12:14 AM
You've got me. But I once saw a bumper sticker that proclaimed, "Rugby players eat their young."

The one I've seen said "It takes leather balls to play Rugby".

Nicholas Carey
12-28-2009, 01:58 AM
Youse guyze is wusses. Compared to hurling, Rugby is a nancy boy English sport.

Manly men play Iománaíocht (hurling). Think of it as tackle lacrosse played with field hockey sticks and hard balls, without protective gear.

http://www.irishculturalfestival.com/images/hurling1.jpg

The hurley (camán) and sliotar:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d4/Hurling_Ball_and_Hurley.JPG/800px-Hurling_Ball_and_Hurley.JPG

Sadly, the wusses that run hurling have made helmets mandatory as of 1 January 2010.

purri
12-28-2009, 06:31 AM
Confused about all this but the Ellas seemed to win most times.

PeterSibley
12-28-2009, 06:42 AM
Sane fathers prefer schoolboys well away from a scrum .Spinal injuries are no fun and most young boys just aren't quite strong enough .....anyway it slows the game too much .League is much faster and much better .:D

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
12-28-2009, 06:45 AM
Sane fathers prefer schoolboys well away from a scrum .Spinal injuries are no fun and most young boys just aren't quite strong enough .....anyway it slows the game too much .League is much faster and much better .:D

Or, for that matter - the version from my part of the world - Sevens.

Presuming Ed
12-28-2009, 07:39 AM
Sane fathers prefer schoolboys well away from a scrum .Spinal injuries are no fun and most young boys just aren't quite strong enough .....anyway it slows the game too much .League is much faster and much better .:D

Which is why mini rugby scrums are only 4 people. 2 front row, 2 second row.

League bores me rigid. Three tackles (or however many it is) and then a kick. Repeat ad infinitum.

Presuming Ed
12-28-2009, 07:44 AM
A scrum. This is England vs South Africa.

http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/44181000/jpg/_44181384_eng_sa_scrum416.jpg

The two number 9s are the scrum halves. The English scrum half is about to put the ball in. The number 6 is the blindside flanker, and 3 the tight head prop. Number 8 is, well, the number 8.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scrum_(rugby_union)

Peerie Maa
12-28-2009, 07:50 AM
Sane fathers prefer schoolboys well away from a scrum .Spinal injuries are no fun and most young boys just aren't quite strong enough .....anyway it slows the game too much .League is much faster and much better .:D


Na. League is boring, too samey, there is more variety of skills and moves in Union.
J D, if you are still confused, I'll ask Kirsty if she can explain. Kirsty plays Union with her Uni squad.

SMARTINSEN
12-28-2009, 07:54 AM
The bumper sticker that I saw was:

Give Blood
Play Rugby

An old acquaintance had a concussion, now he has a metal plate in his head ala Joe Plaice, from playing rugby a long time ago.

J. Dillon
12-28-2009, 08:39 AM
Thanks for the answers. It is somewhat clearer.:)


The idea of the scrum is to heel the ball back to the rear of the scrum where it is picked up


Does this mean one player in the scrum use the heel of his foot ?

Also , in the film, time seemed to be involved. The players near the end of the game bent on prolonging the scrum in order to win Is this true ?:confused:

JD

Peerie Maa
12-28-2009, 08:55 AM
Thanks for the answers. It is somewhat clearer.:)


Does this mean one player in the scrum use the heel of his foot ? Yes, the hooker strives to gain control of the ball with when it is put in, and heels it back. His forwards work it back, keeping it in control until until the scrum half is ready to receive it. The forwards are also trying to drive the scrum forward against the opposing forwards without allowing the scrum to collapse or wheel round.

Also , in the film, time seemed to be involved. The players near the end of the game bent on prolonging the scrum in order to win Is this true ?:confused:

JD
What was the score near the end? I guess that the team in the lead were trying to keep possession so as to protect their lead and maintain a winning score. If they were near the try line they may have been trying to keep the scrum together and drive their opponents back over their own try line.

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
12-28-2009, 09:24 AM
Rugby Sevens is rugby played to Union rules but with seven players (three forwards, four backs) in a side and with logical changes to rules and tactics. It originated in Scotland but in my humble opinion the best Sevens side is usually Fiji and in my totally biassed opinion the best rugby tournament in the world is the Hong Kong Sevens.
....

The real explanation for rugby sevens is not simply to provide a game for fourteen men, but rather a day long drinking opportunity for a whole town - see Jedburgh, Hawick or Gala.

SamSam
12-28-2009, 10:32 AM
At the high school there was a teacher in his early 50s that had his drivers license taken away because he randomly went comatose. He attributed it to his rugby playing college days, where after the game they would drink and have head butting contests, going until one or the other quit or was unable to continue. He marveled at the blood, I marveled at him being a teacher.

switters
12-28-2009, 11:06 AM
Rugby gets played more in America than a lot of people, even Americans, think. Lots of clubs in southern California and even a team here in the middle of Colorado. My take on rugby after playing football in middle school and a year of high school is that it is somewhat less violent than football and a lot more athletic. Rugy players dont wear helmets an pads because they respect the game and know that they will be in a clubhouse drinking with the guy they are about to tackle that same night. Granted, an ear may fall off every once in while if not properly taped and there is some bruising and bleeding but I still think it is played with more "sportsmanship" if there is such a thing than American football.

And that may all be BS, I only played one season overseas with a bunch of US military and Japanese JMSDF. The only reason I got to play was that they couldn't find anyone else stupid enough to walk on the field so they have enough of team to play.

Nicholas Carey
12-28-2009, 12:32 PM
Nicholas Carey's post overlooks the point that Ireland is a major rugby playing nation, but there's not a whole lot of Gaelic sports played at international level.I know...I was making a joke. Rugger is a tough game. I've known several people who played it here in the States. Coming into work on Monday with a broken/sprained/dislocated nose/arm/leg/foot/hand/etc not terribly unusual.

Peerie Maa
12-28-2009, 04:24 PM
I know...I was making a joke. Rugger is a tough game. I've known several people who played it here in the States. Coming into work on Monday with a broken/sprained/dislocated nose/arm/leg/foot/hand/etc not terribly unusual.

One of my fondest memories from my first "Big" school was from assembly during the rugby season. The Head Master would, on fairly regular occasions, read out a letter from the local hospital Matron complimenting the school on the behaviour of a Rugger team member who the hospital was currently putting back together.