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JMAC
12-09-2009, 06:36 PM
I'm going to look at a house for sale tomorrow with the idea of fixing it up a bit and renting it out. The realtor said the house is currently vacant. It's a small ranch and looks decent enough from the street. Is it a basic that I would assume that the well pump and furnace do not work unless I see them working when figuring out an offer if I want to go ahead?

I think I still stand a good chance of seeing the place without the snow in the next week or two. Any advice, warnings, or encouragements are welcome.

huisjen
12-09-2009, 06:42 PM
A water test is nice.

Blood dripping from the walls is a bad sign.

Dan

Paul Pless
12-09-2009, 06:57 PM
underground storage tanks are nice to know about:mad:


that, and watch out for blood dripping from the walls of course.

paladin
12-09-2009, 07:43 PM
Have the place scanned/tested for illegal drugs.......can cause bad allergies in people....and almost impossible to clean out.

2MeterTroll
12-09-2009, 07:56 PM
might check and see if its built on an old grave site. the undead wandering around is a good sign as is the blood running down the walls. I think the best sign is the glowing ritual circle drawn on the floor with various demons crawling out. but then you might check for things like an infestation of flies, that sort of thing.

SMARTINSEN
12-09-2009, 08:07 PM
Septic system and well. The rest of it you can deal with.

Bruce Hooke
12-09-2009, 08:30 PM
When you say "unoccupied" are you also saying that there is no power to the house? Plenty of unoccupied houses still have power. If the house has no power to it and the seller is not willing to turn on the power (and this is not a foreclosed property) I'd be asking some mighty hard questions about why they are not willing to spend a very small amount of money to have the power turned on (i.e., what are they hiding!). Of course if it is a foreclosed property then it seems like a whole separate set of rules (and prices) come into play.

Mrleft8
12-09-2009, 08:48 PM
Watch out for racoons and skunks.

JMAC
12-09-2009, 09:00 PM
The realtor said vacant. We discovered after talking a bit on the phone that we knew each other, both had done work for the same contractor. Any way to capitalize on the acquaintance? With the dripping blood and all, I could still call....hmmm....who you gonna call?

Fitz
12-09-2009, 09:03 PM
Mold, asbestos, lead paint, radon, uses of adjacent properties, especially if you will have tenants.

paladin
12-09-2009, 10:35 PM
I wasn't joking about testing for drugs....

brad9798
12-09-2009, 11:05 PM
With buying and selling hundreds of houses over the years ... shoot me a pm or email with specific questions.

Is it bank owned?

Foreclosure?

What?

JMAC
12-10-2009, 06:36 AM
http://www.camdenre.com/rets_images/main/19931664-1.jpg
...and here it is. I think I can beautify it without breaking the bank. It's a good location for a home-based business. I'll be looking at it late this morning. Flashlight, camera, tape measure, notepad....what else? Remodeling suggestions?

Tealsmith
12-10-2009, 07:51 AM
You can have 'em spray for the undead spirits walking around.

huisjen
12-10-2009, 08:27 AM
Energy Audit. At least get a good look at past heating bills. A quick blower door building-air-tightness test and a look around with a thermal camera would be better, but the heating bills will give a basic idea of what energy performance you can expect.

We're around 7500 heating degree days in central and eastern Maine. Southern Maine is about 7000, and the county is up to 10,000. Figure out how many BTU were used to heat the place for a year. Divide that by the square footage and the heating degree days. Over 9 BTU/s.ft./hdd is pretty leaky. Under 3 BTU/s.ft./hdd is great.

Especially watch out for uninsulated basement walls, and open chases (chimney chase especially) where air can go right up through from the basement to the attic.

And that cute little front porch just screams "shallow graves under here!"

Dan

brad9798
12-10-2009, 09:38 PM
I sent you a pm, jmac!

:)

JMAC
12-11-2009, 08:55 PM
Jeez, couldn't there have been one really nice thing about the place? Well, the back yard turned into mature woods, that was nice. I guess the folks grew old and passed and the daughters are selling the place....uncleaned, un-maintained, filled with Dad's stuff in the basement, shag carpeting, small baths, way out of date kitchen, dust bunnies, squirrel's nest....sigh. Still a real good location. I may go with a very low offer...could be cleaned up and rented as is, and go for a long haul approach to fixing it up.

Paul Pless
12-11-2009, 08:56 PM
Jeez, couldn't there have been one really nice thing about the place? was there no blood dripping down the walls:rolleyes:;)

JMAC
12-11-2009, 09:43 PM
...more of a primordial ooze....

brad9798
12-13-2009, 12:29 AM
Guess you've got it figured out, jmac!

Good on you!

:)

John Smith
12-13-2009, 12:36 AM
I'm going to look at a house for sale tomorrow with the idea of fixing it up a bit and renting it out. The realtor said the house is currently vacant. It's a small ranch and looks decent enough from the street. Is it a basic that I would assume that the well pump and furnace do not work unless I see them working when figuring out an offer if I want to go ahead?

I think I still stand a good chance of seeing the place without the snow in the next week or two. Any advice, warnings, or encouragements are welcome.

A couple. if the water is on, run it, flush all toilets.

If there's a sump pump, look inside. We bought a house with a sump pump and found when we did get water in the basement during heavy rains, that was the only dry thing down there. We had to put a french drain in outside.

Point here is if you see a sump pump, don't assume it keeps the basement dry.

John Smith
12-13-2009, 12:37 AM
Get a competent inspection. I've never had one that didn't find something wrong, which then can be used to haggle a lower price.
How does one find a competent inspector. Mine found stuff, but what he didn't find........