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View Full Version : Don't mess with Texas waitresses!



Tom Galyen
12-08-2009, 05:16 PM
I don't know if this is true or not but I thought it is a great story.


HOUSTON HERALD NEWSPAPER" IN HOUSTON , TEXAS MARCH 5th, 2009 ~

Last Thursday night around midnight, a woman from Houston , Texas was
arrested, jailed, and charged with manslaughter for shooting a man 6 times
in the back as he was running away with her purse.

The following Monday morning, the woman was called in front of the
arraignment judge, sworn in, and asked to explain her actions.
The woman replied, "I was standing at the corner bus stop for about 15 minutes,
waiting for the bus to take me home after work. I am a waitress at a local cafe...
I was there alone, so I had my right hand on my pistol, that was in my purse,
that was hung over my left shoulder.

All of a sudden I was being spun around hard to my left. As I caught my balance,
I saw a man running away from me with my purse.
I looked down at my right hand and I saw that my fingers were wrapped tightly around my pistol.
The next thing I remember is saying out loud, "no way punk! Your not stealing my pay check and tips."
I raised my right hand, pointed my pistol at the man running away from me with my purse,
and squeezed the trigger of my pistol 6 times!

When asked by the arraignment judge, "why did you shoot the man 6 times?

The woman replied under oath, "because, when I pulled the trigger the 7th time, it only went click."

The woman was acquitted of all charges. She was back at work, at the café the next day!

Phillip Allen
12-08-2009, 06:42 PM
not very likely to be true...good story just the same

Glen Longino
12-08-2009, 06:58 PM
I doubt the story is true.
I've heard other versions of the same story.
The most doubtful part of this one is that while he's running away she looks down and sees her pistol in her hand then raises the pistol and hits him six times while he's running.
I'm a good shot with a handgun, but I doubt I could hit him six times, running, beyond a few yards.

The Bigfella
12-08-2009, 06:58 PM
I'd believe it - but I also know someone (married to a cousin) who's brother fired the whole lot at someone who pointed a gun at him (it turned out to be a replica). He effectively missed with all of them... achieved some minor wounds IIRC. The other cop there reached over his shoulder and ended the fracas.

bucheron
12-08-2009, 07:55 PM
I don't know if this is true or not but I thought it is a great story.

Last Thursday night around midnight, a woman from Houston , Texas was
arrested, jailed, and charged with manslaughter ...
..The following Monday morning, the woman was called in front of the
arraignment judge,The woman was acquitted of all charges. She was back at work, at the café the next day!

I agree a great story. Maybe one of those that ought to be true, even if not. A link to the news story would be nice.

The speed of the process is commendable. No legal matter seems to get settled in less than six months in this part of the world. Then there is Andrew C-B's story about a UK firearm offender who has pleaded guilty and will not be sentenced for some months.

It does support the theory that if you leave the other guy dead, he cannot refute your version of events.

paladin
12-08-2009, 08:21 PM
It's not killing the rotton no good, s.o.b. that's the problem.....it's moving the body or tampering with it...the story of Erikk Thorvaldsson is a case in point.....someone was stealing his sheep....a hanging offense....so he puts a couple of thralls (slaves) out to watch, do not get engaged, just report......every couple of nights they would sneak back and steal a sheep......he steps out in front of them and confronts then...they draw swords, he kills them....and walks away....goes to the masters house and tells him he just killed two of his slaves for stealing sheep......now this scenario would have been alright...they were caught in the act.......but what actually happened, the bodies were moved and hidden...they had to look for them......the fight was legal, the body hiding wasn't, so they were banned, his entire family from his land in Iceland,,,so he moved everything to Sondrestromfiord on Greenland...

Glen Longino
12-08-2009, 08:35 PM
In Texas, killing a person running away from you would be a problem.
The only excuse for killing a person in Texas is that you believe he is about to kill you, your life is in danger,or he is about to kill somebody else in your presence.
The waitress story is merely a metaphor for "raw justice". It sounds good and proper, but would likely bring manslaughter charges against the waitress.

The Bigfella
12-08-2009, 08:39 PM
We had one here where a female security guard was IIRC bashed by a guy robbing an armoured car. She shot him as he was in his car making his escape. She was charged but got off.

bucheron
12-08-2009, 09:18 PM
In Texas, killing a person running away from you would be a problem.
The only excuse for killing a person in Texas is that you believe he is about to kill you, your life is in danger,or he is about to kill somebody else in your presence.
The waitress story is merely a metaphor for "raw justice". It sounds good and proper, but would likely bring manslaughter charges against the waitress.

I don't know if the story is true, but I am happy to discuss it as a hypothetical.

It says the waitress was charged with manslaughter. Can an arraignment judge decide not to proceed with a trial?

If he decides not to, can that decision be reviewed and overturned by a higher authority?

In Bigfella's example, the last I heard in New South Wales, a police officer was not just allowed, but required to use his/her firearm to stop the commission of a felony. This may not be the case in other Australian States or Territories. So an armed security guard may be covered by the same sort of law.

Bruce Hooke
12-08-2009, 10:55 PM
Thank you Glen. Frankly, I would not want to live in a place where it was considered legal and acceptable to kill someone for purse snatching (unless, of course, the shooting was actually in self-defense because the criminal was continuing to actively threaten you). What's next, 2 years in jail for going 10mph over the speed limit? OK to shoot someone who cuts you off on the highway...after all, they were a threat to you.

On bucheron's questions...the whole story falls apart on the points you raised. The story says she was acquitted. This implies a trial, which most certainly would not happen on the same day as the arraignment. In certain cases a judge can dismiss all charges, but I can't imagine this happening without a lot of additional legal briefs and so on, especially in a case where there is a death.

On your last point, regarding police being "required to use his/her firearm to stop the commission of a felony" I would be very surprised if there were not a whole series of steps the police would be required to go through before they shoot to kill. For example, first calling on the suspect to stop, then doing the same with the weapon drawn, with a verbal warning that the officer has a gun and is prepared to shoot, and so on. Simply drawing and shooting without warning is the kind of thing that generates public protests even in much less free countries than the US and Australia.

Three Cedars
12-08-2009, 11:05 PM
Here is a genuine Canadian gun owner who got fed up and shot someone intent on robbing him . He got the job done well enough...

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/british-columbia/story/2009/12/07/bc-jewellershooter.html

Glen Longino
12-08-2009, 11:39 PM
Good points, Bruce.
Having been a police officer out here in the badlands in my youth, I had several temptations to send some badasses to the happy hunting ground.
Fortunately for me, I was never so afraid that I killed one of them out of fear for my own life. One more step in my direction could have meant the end of a few hombres, but they always stopped just in the nick if time.
In those tense moments, a fraction of a second movement in the wrong direction by the badass could have made me pull the trigger. But I never had to kill one of the bastards, and I'm so glad.
I call it good fortune that none of the badasses ever Forced me to kill them.
I took a few blows about the head and shoulders, but always had control of my pistola.
Funny thing, other cops rush to assist a cop in trouble. Several times I had to protect my felonious outlaw badass, who had just knocked the crap out of me, from other cops who wanted to beat the hell out of him in retribution while he was handcuffed and helpless on the roadside.
I never failed to stand up for a helpless felonious badass in my custody.
Some people have to be killed, some don't.
A man running away from me will never be shot in the back.

bucheron
12-09-2009, 02:10 AM
Glen and Bruce, thanks for your responses. On looking at my first response it seems a bit frivolous. I apologise for that.




Frankly, I would not want to live in a place where it was considered legal and acceptable to kill someone for purse snatching (unless, of course, the shooting was actually in self-defense because the criminal was continuing to actively threaten you). What's next, 2 years in jail for going 10mph over the speed limit? OK to shoot someone who cuts you off on the highway...after all, they were a threat to you.

I take that point, but how serious a robbery should be tolerated? In Australia, there were a number of cases which went to trial, where shopkeepers defended their property and people their homes and lives with firearms. Juries acquitted them, presumably the killings were justified. Surveys and letters to the media generally agreed with the verdicts. Yet our government legislated to drastically tighten gun control and specifically removed "self-defense" as a valid reason for ownership of any firearm.



On bucheron's questions...the whole story falls apart on the points you raised. The story says she was acquitted. This implies a trial, which most certainly would not happen on the same day as the arraignment. In certain cases a judge can dismiss all charges, but I can't imagine this happening without a lot of additional legal briefs and so on, especially in a case where there is a death.

That is pretty much what I would have thought.



On your last point, regarding police being "required to use his/her firearm to stop the commission of a felony" I would be very surprised if there were not a whole series of steps the police would be required to go through before they shoot to kill. For example, first calling on the suspect to stop, then doing the same with the weapon drawn, with a verbal warning that the officer has a gun and is prepared to shoot, and so on. Simply drawing and shooting without warning is the kind of thing that generates public protests even in much less free countries than the US and Australia.

You may well be right. I read about this requirement about twenty years ago, in a publication by a civil liberties organization. They said this was a left-over from colonial times when a considerable majority of the population of NSW were ex-convicts many of whom had not yet served their time but were on parole in the community. Much more recently I asked a police officer (whom I met sailing) about it. He confirmed the story and said "but it has to be a felony." In the other states of Australia, police did not routinely carry firearms. Now they practically all do.


Good points, Bruce.
....... I never had to kill one of the bastards, and I'm so glad.


I'm glad for you too. I would not like it to be thought that I took this subject lightly.


Several times I had to protect my felonious outlaw ...... from other cops who wanted to beat the hell out of him in retribution while he was handcuffed and helpless on the roadside.

When you make a statement like that, it gives me a great deal of respect for your opinions.

The link posted by Three Cedars provokes a lot of thought. It is a genuine report, rather than a possible urban myth.

The Bigfella
12-09-2009, 02:54 AM
I was in a certain State's police HQ when the Port Arthur massacre went down. A day or two later, I was talking to a special ops guy in the canteen. He'd been flown down and was on the ground while the action was still going on. He pointed out that under Tasmanian law, he was not allowed to shoot the miserable POS who was killing the 35 people and wounding 21 more. He went on to say "if he'd been in my sights, he'd be dead now... law or no law". I'm willing to bet if that had happened, he wouldn't have had too much of a problem either.

Captain Blight
12-09-2009, 03:22 AM
Good points, Bruce.
Having been a police officer out here in the badlands in my youth, I had several temptations to send some badasses to the happy hunting ground.
Fortunately for me, I was never so afraid that I killed one of them out of fear for my own life. One more step in my direction could have meant the end of a few hombres, but they always stopped just in the nick if time.
In those tense moments, a fraction of a second movement in the wrong direction by the badass could have made me pull the trigger. But I never had to kill one of the bastards, and I'm so glad.
I call it good fortune that none of the badasses ever Forced me to kill them.
I took a few blows about the head and shoulders, but always had control of my pistola.
Funny thing, other cops rush to assist a cop in trouble. Several times I had to protect my felonious outlaw badass, who had just knocked the crap out of me, from other cops who wanted to beat the hell out of him in retribution while he was handcuffed and helpless on the roadside.
I never failed to stand up for a helpless felonious badass in my custody.
Some people have to be killed, some don't.
A man running away from me will never be shot in the back.Jeepers, Glen, I didn't know you used to be a cop!

Effin' pigs.

Seriously? It's good to see that at least one of the Boys in Blue exercises a little restraint. I troll through the cop forums from time to time to see what the current mindset is, and it's bone-chilling to see how many of them just seem to be waiting until they're in the "right" situation to kill someone and get away with it. To get away with murder.

ChaseKenyon
12-09-2009, 03:23 AM
Here is a genuine Canadian gun owner who got fed up and shot someone intent on robbing him . He got the job done well enough...

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/british-col...ershooter.html (http://www.cbc.ca/canada/british-columbia/story/2009/12/07/bc-jewellershooter.html)






I was in a certain State's police HQ when the Port Arthur massacre went down. A day or two later, I was talking to a special ops guy in the canteen. He'd been flown down and was on the ground while the action was still going on. He pointed out that under Tasmanian law, he was not allowed to shoot the miserable POS who was killing the 35 people and wounding 21 more. He went on to say "if he'd been in my sights, he'd be dead now... law or no law". I'm willing to bet if that had happened, he wouldn't have had too much of a problem either.
I have been married (this time) for 35 years to my soulmate. Many of our "enlightened friends say we have been together for over 2000 (bearing in mind that time may be part ast and part future).

Anyone puts a firearm to her head or body or any other leathal weapon as a threat to her life ...........

I will ......will......will .....kill them deader than the coackroach I respect more that invaded my kitchen.

you can take that to the bank.

Ask Chuck what he'd do

I am a peaceful person my lawyer calls a wuss cause I let folks take advantage so often.

On the other hand if you come within five feet of me there are 27 ways to kill you with my bare hands.

Taught to kill for country

only kill if no other option

no hesitation, you remove yourself from the ranks of polite humanity..............

I have no problem with it.

EOD for me

paladin
12-09-2009, 04:01 AM
I developed a similar attitude......we're alright until you point a weapon at me....at that point I just consider that you are committing suicide and I don't wanna go with you.

Captain Blight
12-09-2009, 05:08 AM
On a related note, is anyone else concerned by the growing trend of "suicide by cop?" It's a nasty way to go, endangers the (at least nominally) innocent, and incidences are on the rise.

seanz
12-09-2009, 05:26 AM
Jeepers, Glen, I didn't know you used to be a cop!

I like to think he was one of the good ones.
;)



Bet he was hell to argue with if he pulled you over for speeding.
:D

Bruce Hooke
12-09-2009, 09:55 AM
Good points, Bruce.
Having been a police officer out here in the badlands in my youth, I had several temptations to send some badasses to the happy hunting ground.
Fortunately for me, I was never so afraid that I killed one of them out of fear for my own life. One more step in my direction could have meant the end of a few hombres, but they always stopped just in the nick if time.
In those tense moments, a fraction of a second movement in the wrong direction by the badass could have made me pull the trigger. But I never had to kill one of the bastards, and I'm so glad.
I call it good fortune that none of the badasses ever Forced me to kill them.
I took a few blows about the head and shoulders, but always had control of my pistola.
Funny thing, other cops rush to assist a cop in trouble. Several times I had to protect my felonious outlaw badass, who had just knocked the crap out of me, from other cops who wanted to beat the hell out of him in retribution while he was handcuffed and helpless on the roadside.
I never failed to stand up for a helpless felonious badass in my custody.
Some people have to be killed, some don't.
A man running away from me will never be shot in the back.

Thank you! Good to hear about someone doing the right thing on so many counts!

pefjr
12-09-2009, 10:43 AM
I like that Texas waitress. She's got moxy. Too bad about the thug, so sad.:D such a loss.

John of Phoenix
12-09-2009, 11:30 AM
Six shots in the back? That's one tough guy to be standing and take all six bullets.

Google results for Houston Herald Newspaper (http://www.google.com/search?pz=1&cf=all&ned=us&hl=en&q=HOUSTON+HERALD+NEWSPAPER&btnmeta%3Dsearch%3Dsearch=Search+the+Web).

Turns out it's in Texas county, but that's in Missouri. Kinda puts the whole thing in doubt.