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View Full Version : Did Sherlock Holmes exhibit signs of Asperger's?



rbgarr
12-06-2009, 05:06 PM
From an NYTimes article:

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/06/magazine/06diagnosis-t.html?ref=magazine&pagewanted=all

The thought at the end of the article linking Holmes with television characters House and Monk (and Columbo to my mind) is one that hadn't occurred to me before. :)

(BTW, I suspect there are some Bilge dwellers who suffer from AS, too.)

LeeG
12-06-2009, 05:10 PM
I'm thinking my dad had it.

Concordia...41
12-06-2009, 05:24 PM
I hadn't heard of it until a couple of years ago when we were retained by a client with that diagnosis.

As a sub-diagnosis (is that the right term) of autism, it's covered under the ADA laws.

Anyone need an expert in the field? I can hook you up. ;)

rbgarr
12-06-2009, 05:48 PM
My son 'babysat' for a boy with it some years ago. The boy explained what it was like, as he had done as a 'presentation' for his schoolmates so they'd understand why he acted the way he did sometimes:

The boy described it as a kind of blindness or tunnel vision (sounding similar to the 'mind-blindness' in the article). He was simply unaware of certain things about other people, their needs and expectations, and sometimes was not even aware they were there. When he'd have an outburst it was often a result of being suddenly frightened by a person 'appearing where there had been no one before'.

His mother told my wife that his description of his syndrome to his classmates generated a lot of questions, genuine curiosity and better understanding on their part afterwards and was the best thing he could have done. The other kids became remarkably forgiving, more friendly and interested in helping him cope.

Phillip Allen
12-06-2009, 05:54 PM
My son 'babysat' for a boy with it some years ago. The boy explained what it was like, as he had done as a 'presentation' for his schoolmates so they'd understand why he acted the way he did sometimes:

The boy described it as a kind of blindness or tunnel vision (sounding similar to the 'mind-blindness' in the article). He was simply unaware of certain things about other people, their needs and expectations, and sometimes was not even aware they were there. When he'd have an outburst it was often a result of being suddenly frightened by a person 'appearing where there had been no one before'.

His mother told my wife that his description of his syndrome to his classmates generated a lot of questions, genuine curiosity and better understanding on their part afterwards and was the best thing he could have done. The other kids became remarkably forgiving, more friendly and interested in helping him cope.

good to hear...

BarnacleGrim
12-06-2009, 06:10 PM
I know a guy with it. Highly successful with computers. Last I heard he was applying for a job at Google. Not sure if he got it, though.

jonboy
12-07-2009, 06:05 AM
Why don't they do a DNA test on his remains...or scour the Baker St flat for genetic material...I met a bloke in the pub who was a third generation cabby, his great grandad regularly picked up Dr. Watson ...perhaps they could ask him...

downthecreek
12-07-2009, 06:10 AM
I know a guy with it. Highly successful with computers. Last I heard he was applying for a job at Google. Not sure if he got it, though.

I heard an interview on the radio with a Danish guy who runs a company that tests and debugs software for companies like MS. He employs only people diagnosed with autism and Asperger's. Says they love the work, are incredibly diligent and have very substantially higher accuracy rates than "normal" employees.

rbgarr
12-07-2009, 07:59 AM
Why don't they do a DNA test on his remains...

Because Holmes and Watson are fictional characters??

LeeG
12-07-2009, 09:36 AM
shhhhh

jonboy
12-08-2009, 07:02 AM
Because Holmes and Watson are fictional characters??


oh dear, really?

rbgarr
12-08-2009, 05:04 PM
jonboy,

That guy in the pub owes you a drink. :D

jonboy
12-09-2009, 05:41 AM
It's on Sarcastipaedia...

Sherlock Holmes, noted Victorian author whose most famous and enduring book, Half a Conan Doyle, is the story of an illegitimate heir to the Conan Doyle fortunes but as his birth certificate registered him only as Doyle... the problems continue...

The sequel, The Hunt for the Basketballs, takes the story across the Atlantic to Dartmoor, Nebraska, and is set in a neo gothic Victorian dog kennel. Emigrant Doyle, now the breeder of huge and ferocious dogs has trained them to fetch all large balls to destroy the local highschool's chances of practicing for the finals, ensuring his team win the prize money and he can return to England rich and claim his fortune.
Its all a load of balls really.

ChaseKenyon
12-09-2009, 06:07 AM
It has been written that about 50% or more of the people with an IQ in the top 10% have some form of autism now called apspergers which basically is functional who says ? a form of autism.

Been studying it for 30 years as the comments about my AADD did not seem to fit more than about 40% of my life.

I have helped numerous folks with serious not autism but aspergers go on to more self controlled productive lifes. running an ongoing unofficail residential program here at the ex boarding house with 7 no 6 on now only five bedrooms.

If that does not mean much ask someone with aspergers how out of control thier life feels.


It can be overwhelming and the very nature can lead to those who have it being able to control there pulse and heart rate to the point of easily (within the ability of 95% of sufferors) of just deciding to go to sleep deeper and deeper and not waking up.

people with it that have loved ones have a real conundrum if facing depression as they can at will choose to go to sleep and just stop living.

Try living with that for thirty or more years.

not easy for one or family.



it is a very serious condition that many suffer from in abscense of awarness.

That is the real pity.

yes

even after running a ongoing shelter to help others ....

difficult to talk about

it if you check will expalian how my typing anfter all my educationand past is always buggerd as being ten minutesx behind wher my thoughts are

Sory this is too close to home and hope you can all at the WBF understand

jonboy
12-09-2009, 08:32 AM
It has been written that about 50% or more of the people with an IQ in the top 10% have some form of autism now called apspergers which basically is functional who says ? a form of autism.

Been studying it for 30 years as the comments about my AADD did not seem to fit more than about 40% of my life.

I have helped numerous folks with serious not autism but aspergers go on to more self controlled productive lifes. running an ongoing unofficail residential program here at the ex boarding house with 7 no 6 on now only five bedrooms.

If that does not mean much ask someone with aspergers how out of control thier life feels.


It can be overwhelming and the very nature can lead to those who have it being able to control there pulse and heart rate to the point of easily (within the ability of 95% of sufferors) of just deciding to go to sleep deeper and deeper and not waking up.

people with it that have loved ones have a real conundrum if facing depression as they can at will choose to go to sleep and just stop living.

Try living with that for thirty or more years.

not easy for one or family.



it is a very serious condition that many suffer from in abscense of awarness.

That is the real pity.

yes

even after running a ongoing shelter to help others ....

difficult to talk about

it if you check will expalian how my typing anfter all my educationand past is always buggerd as being ten minutesx behind wher my thoughts are

Sory this is too close to home and hope you can all at the WBF understand



selective autistic dyslexia causing occasional anasyntaxis can be a pain....it can come on very suddenly... I noticed no or almost no signs in the post on Texan waitresses....
Should someone with limited social skills, through an unavoidable disease, and the inability to read and write correctly really have control over a firearm?
Truly deeply scary.

jonboy
12-09-2009, 11:51 AM
Having limited social skills does not make one a treat to society; you are confusing limited social skills with antisocial behavior. Not the same.

And how does the "ability to read and write correctly" figure into safe gun handling?

There are plenty of gun threads where you can express your opinions and criticisms about guns in America, and I welcome those discussions and will be happy to engage in a civil debate. But your comments here are off the mark by a wide margin.


Are they...? you obviously didn't read the Texan waitress thread...

And anyway loosen up every one... this was, I assumed some days ago, a light hearted jibe at the fictional character S. Holmes esq. but every one got so up their own backsides about Asperger's they either missed the point of the thread or they are a sad lot indeed.
When one contributor with not exactly subtle opinions can write an eloquent and reasonably loquacious post one minute but then play the stream of consciousness card the next, I don't see the reasoning.
AND... (but now I have risen to the bait). The statement '...confusing limited social skills with antisocial behaviour. Not the same' is your assumption. ' I agree entirely, but as, by definition, those who exhibit anti social behaviour are almost certainly going to have limited social skills, there is, in one way at least , a correlation.
I won't enter a gun debate with you because I suspect I'm on your side as a gun owner and hunter for the table, but I do have opinions about the intelligence of allowing anyone with retarded abilities to be in charge of any deadly weapon, car, speedboat, or firearm.
There is a reason why many countries will only issue driving licences and firearms permits to people who have reached a certain recognised school level or grade... Basically If you can't read and write you can't be that smart, if you are not that smart you shouldn't be in charge of any kind of weapon, four wheels or six chambers. A generalization , but sound in principle.

I wonder how many respondees have read the whole thread and all the posts before commenting.

jonboy
12-09-2009, 04:34 PM
Hi Mr TLL... I agree again, and your last paragraph is relevant but if I am to get picky ... college degrees aren't quite how I interpreted the criteria and going up and back..
Retarded doesn't carry quite the same weight this side of the Atlantic perhaps... I thought it might prove to be a bit offensive but politically correct language is hardly a standard for entry to the Bilge...

It's not my professional area so I can only be opionated, but opinionated through some small personal experiences..'...another flawed statement indicating little understanding....etc..' Every person I have ever met who had serious learning difficulty problems..( I am not referring to dyslexia for example) but retarded ouch that word again, challenged, bi polar, possibly a bit schizo, I wouldn't trust with a blender let alone any of the above mentioned tools..
And finally I wasn't getting personal about Chase or anyone else, but yes, I will correct you as I think you are wrong, but...I honestly think, referring to the striking dissimiliarities in various posts that are are either Walter Mitty or a sign of something deeply disturbing, whether in said poster's case or not, I wouldn't trust that person with a gun. period.

rbgarr
12-09-2009, 05:11 PM
None of us are the same every day, and we can all be weird from time to time.


guilty as charged :D

2MeterTroll
12-09-2009, 05:31 PM
fictional persons do not exhibit anything unless the writer puts it in.
Ask the writer.

geeses you folks act like Holms is real.

rbgarr
12-09-2009, 06:34 PM
2MT,

Did you read the link?? Conan Doyle's characterization of Holmes was the whole thrust of the article.

2MeterTroll
12-09-2009, 06:44 PM
yep i did And i think the lot of you are missing the mark. Doyle had himself as a model for the symptoms; as well as many of the more successful Victorians. its the only age in which aspergers would be considered normal behavior.

Look at Doyle's back ground and you get a key to his Holms. watson is the watcher in his head that analyzed the social situations from a third person perspective powerless to enact any change till the event was over. IMO