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View Full Version : Pate a choux/Pate Chaud



paladin
11-16-2009, 04:37 AM
While in Vietnam I became addicted to the little meat pies that the street vendors sold early each morning. I would walk out onto the sidewalk and the lady would be there with a nice selection and her hot coffee Cafe sim....(french coffee)...I'd get a couple of the pies and a cuppa coffee to start my morning....
There are no Vietnamese style bakeries anywhere close.......so........I made some puff pastry dough yesterday, left it in the fridge overnight, made the pies this morning, (they are in the oven) and the coffee is running thru........and they smell good. While I was at it....I filled some of the dough pockets with cherry pie filling......just for a little sweetness....

Andrew Craig-Bennett
11-16-2009, 06:22 AM
Happy to report that you can still get them, in Saigon, anyway.

Well done for making your own puff pastry rather than wimping out and buying the dough (mind you, my wife does not make her own spring roll pastry..)

Nicholas Carey
11-16-2009, 10:06 AM
More Vietnamese restaurants here in Seattle than you can shake a stick at (only Thai restaraunts are more numerous).

Lots and lots of phở joints -- phở being vietnamese noodle soup -- one of the better things we got out of the war in Vietnam.

Bánh mě stands pretty common, too. (Bánh mě are French baguette sandwiches...as interpreted by the Vietnamese. Tasty. Cheap. mmmm...)

And a few swanker Vietnamese places like the Tamarind Tree (http://www.tamarindtreerestaurant.com/) or Monsoon (http://www.monsoonrestaurants.com/seattle/), too.

Good stuff!

paladin
11-16-2009, 01:48 PM
Yup, I go for the pho Hanoi meself...the spicy beef stuff.......

Andrew...I gotta drive lotsa miles for a large enough grocery store that sells puff pastry, and then all you can get is the Pepperidge farm stuff....and it's not the best.

Kaa
11-16-2009, 01:55 PM
As far as I'm concerned, the point of meat pies is to make you unable to see the meat before it gets into your mouth :D

Kaa

John of Phoenix
11-16-2009, 03:37 PM
Recipes please.

paladin
11-16-2009, 03:51 PM
John, I can print them out and send them to you......I have them loaded into a cookbook program, and after writing into it, I cannot copy to reproduce it anywhere....send your snail mail address in the box and I'll mail them.

John of Phoenix
11-17-2009, 09:28 AM
Just sent a you PM. Thanks so much.

huisjen
11-17-2009, 09:35 AM
As far as I'm concerned, the point of meat pies is to make you unable to see the meat before it gets into your mouth :D

Kaa

I went to a local foods potluck the other night. Someone made porcupine pie.

Dan

Bob (oh, THAT Bob)
11-17-2009, 01:57 PM
More Vietnamese restaurants here in Seattle than you can shake a stick at (only Thai restaraunts are more numerous).

Lots and lots of phở joints -- phở being vietnamese noodle soup -- one of the better things we got out of the war in Vietnam.

Bánh mě stands pretty common, too. (Bánh mě are French baguette sandwiches...as interpreted by the Vietnamese. Tasty. Cheap. mmmm...)

And a few swanker Vietnamese places like the Tamarind Tree (http://www.tamarindtreerestaurant.com/) or Monsoon (http://www.monsoonrestaurants.com/seattle/), too.

Good stuff!

I got hooked on pho and then relocated for a few years and couldn't get it to save my life, even at the one Vietnamese restaurant I could find, I asked and they said, "Oh no, that's special dish, we don't make." The broth and the meat flavors are perfectly complimented by the fresh lime and Thai basil. Yum. A friend of mine likes it but always leaves the noodles. I eat her noodles. OK, that didn't come out right.

Tamarind Tree is awesome. The food and interior are swanky, but the prices are not. Last I was there (hmm, perhaps a couple of years, need to go back, was invited there on a date), a very nice lunch for two with drinks for $20. Definitely recommend for the locals. Easy to miss, the place does not front to the street as I recall, totally hidden.

Nicholas Carey
11-17-2009, 02:50 PM
Tamarind Tree is awesome. The food and interior are swanky, but the prices are not. Last I was there (hmm, perhaps a couple of years, need to go back, was invited there on a date), a very nice lunch for two with drinks for $20. Definitely recommend for the locals. Easy to miss, the place does not front to the street as I recall, totally hidden.As an aside, if you want really superb Sichuan food, there's a tiny little hole in the wall in the same strip mall, very cleverly named "Sichuanese Cuisine Restaurant". It's facing Jackson, right next door to Thanh Vi (another Vietnamese resto). I'm told the Chinese ideograms on the sign actually say "Traditional Sichuan Cooking". It's some of the best Sichuanese food I've ever had.

The only better Sichuan meal I can think of was back in the early 80s. The Chinese gov't had opened up a showcase Sichuanese restaurant in Manhattan, a couple of blocks from the UN. The Chinese flew in the entire kitchen staff from Sichuan, and were flying in most of the ingredients. It rocked. Best spring rolls I have ever had. Blistering hot, crispy rice paper wrappers. Interior perfectly cooked, not greasy in the least. And at the very center....crisp, ice-cold shredded lettuce/carrots. I can still taste them in my head.