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goodbasil
11-12-2009, 10:25 PM
Watching the story from Afghanistan about the army bomb dog being found after 14 months. They also mentioned that an Australian had been awarded the Victoria Cross for the first time in 40 years. (That'll get him a free beer at the legion.)
What did he do to deserve it. Got a news link?

The Bigfella
11-12-2009, 10:39 PM
Trooper Donaldson.

I'll find you a link

that was easy....

http://www.defence.gov.au/special_events/TPR_markDonaldson.htm

The Bigfella
11-12-2009, 10:42 PM
There's more at the link.... but, here's the citation:


AUSTRALIAN ARMY
AWARDED THE VICTORIA CROSS FOR AUSTRALIA
TROOPER MARK GREGOR DONALDSON

For most conspicuous acts of gallantry in action in a circumstance of great peril in Afghanistan as part of the Special Operations Task Group during Operation SLIPPER, Oruzgan Province, Afghanistan.
Trooper Mark Gregor Donaldson enlisted into the Australian Army on 18 June 2002. After completing Recruit and Initial and Employment Training he was posted to the 1st Battalion, The Royal Australian Regiment. Having successfully completed the Special Air Service Selection Course in April 2004, Trooper Donaldson was posted to Special Air Service Regiment in May 2004.

On 2 September 2008, during the conduct of a fighting patrol, Trooper Donaldson was travelling in a combined Afghan, US and Australian vehicle convoy that was engaged by a numerically superior, entrenched and coordinated enemy ambush. The ambush was initiated by a high volume of sustained machine gun fire coupled with the effective use of rocket propelled grenades. Such was the effect of the initiation that the combined patrol suffered numerous casualties, completely lost the initiative and became immediately suppressed. It was over two hours before the convoy was able to establish a clean break and move to an area free of enemy fire.

In the early stages of the ambush, Trooper Donaldson reacted spontaneously to regain the initiative. He moved rapidly between alternate positions of cover engaging the enemy with 66mm and 84mm anti-armour weapons as well as his M4 rifle. During an early stage of the enemy ambush, he deliberately exposed himself to enemy fire in order to draw attention to himself and thus away from wounded soldiers. This selfless act alone bought enough time for those wounded to be moved to relative safety.

As the enemy had employed the tactic of a rolling ambush, the patrol was forced to conduct numerous vehicle manoeuvres, under intense enemy fire, over a distance of approximately four kilometres to extract the convoy from the engagement area. Compounding the extraction was the fact that casualties had consumed all available space within the vehicles. Those who had not been wounded, including Trooper Donaldson, were left with no option but to run beside the vehicles throughout. During the conduct of this vehicle manoeuvre to extract the convoy from the engagement area, a severely wounded coalition force interpreter was inadvertently left behind. Of his own volition and displaying complete disregard for his own safety, Trooper Donaldson moved alone, on foot, across approximately 80 metres of exposed ground to recover the wounded interpreter. His movement, once identified by the enemy, drew intense and accurate machine gun fire from entrenched positions. Upon reaching the wounded coalition force interpreter, Trooper Donaldson picked him up and carried him back to the relative safety of the vehicles then provided immediate first aid before returning to the fight.

On subsequent occasions during the battle, Trooper Donaldson administered medical care to other wounded soldiers, whilst continually engaging the enemy.

Trooper Donaldson’s acts of exceptional gallantry in the face of accurate and sustained enemy fire ultimately saved the life of a coalition force interpreter and ensured the safety of the other members of the combined Afghan, US and Australian force. Trooper Donaldson’s actions on this day displayed exceptional courage in circumstances of great peril. His actions are of the highest accord and are in keeping with the finest traditions of the Special Operations Command, the Australian Army and the Australian Defence Force.

seanz
11-12-2009, 10:54 PM
Back to two living recipients?
I didn't know (or I'd forgotten:() that Kenna had died.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Kenna

goodbasil
11-12-2009, 11:23 PM
Thanks.

purri
11-12-2009, 11:42 PM
Lucky fella. They'll never put him in the field again.

The Bigfella
11-13-2009, 12:07 AM
Lucky fella. They'll never put him in the field again.

I seem to recall him having a bit to say about that. He's been back over there, but probably not on patrol.

purri
11-13-2009, 02:05 AM
Probably bump him up through a series of intensives and thence through PSO with some "long looks" and maybe as far as a light colonel in Training Command or DOC. Good for morale but perhaps not his pysche unless he gets PTSD help big time. He may get aggro as to "letting the troopies down" but who knows.

skuthorp
11-13-2009, 07:14 AM
From tonight's news I understand he is due back with his unit late this year. I don't think that making a PR figure for the army would achieve much, just provide photo op's for fawning pollies. Should get a promotion though.