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huisjen
10-31-2009, 04:55 PM
http://photos-f.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs040.snc3/12745_1137068231721_1377814400_30319763_1792162_n. jpg

Today was the first day of deer season, Maine residents only, just for the day. Sarabelle said she saw a deer cross the yard, and when I went to look I found it eating windfall pears at the back corner of the house.

I took several pictures out the living room window, then went upstairs to my bathroom, removed the screen, quietly and slowly cranked open the casement window about 4", and took a few more shots, including this one.

It's been said here several times that before you try to shoot a deer you should see if you can get close enough to get a picture. Well then! However, even though as an agricultural land owner I'm allowed to hunt on my own property, without getting a doe tag (in advance, some time in the spring) I can only shoot a buck, and Sara says no killing Bambi.

Dan

Phillip Allen
10-31-2009, 04:58 PM
since deer season opend and closed (muzzloader), I haven't seen any deer where I nearly always saw them...

Paul Pless
10-31-2009, 05:36 PM
Alabama's rifle season runs from the week before Thansgiving until January 31st. Most counties allow a buck and a doe per day, for a $22 hunting license.

I go for about an hour walk in the woods here in Hell just about everyday. I have seen at least one deer everyday for the last week.

Phil Heffernan
10-31-2009, 05:47 PM
Alabama's rifle season runs from the week before Thansgiving until January 31st. Most counties allow a buck and a doe per day, for a $22 hunting license.

I go for about an hour walk in the woods here in Hell just about everyday. I have seen at least one deer everyday for the last week.
Good on ya for the exercise:)
Plenty of deer in Cold Spring, plenty rural for lots of forage for them, not rural enough for hunting!

PH

JBreeze
10-31-2009, 06:26 PM
Alabama's rifle season runs from the week before Thansgiving until January 31st. Most counties allow a buck and a doe per day, for a $22 hunting license.

I go for about an hour walk in the woods here in Hell just about everyday. I have seen at least one deer everyday for the last week.

Is there a big difference is size between the Alabama and Michigan Deer? I noticed that the size of the deer seem to decrease as one moves down the east coast from Canada.

Had to stay in Yorktown, VA once and the locals told me to watch out for the deer on the rural roads near dusk. Hell, those weren't deer - they were minatures - the size of greyhounds.:D

goodbasil
10-31-2009, 06:37 PM
Read once, that there were more deer now than during the Lewis & Clarke expedition.

ahp
10-31-2009, 07:30 PM
I wish they had deer season on this island. One walked across the road in front of me today. Missed it. I think they have been eating my Rose of Sharon shrubs.

Captain Blight
10-31-2009, 08:53 PM
Rats with antlers. South Central Wisconsin, where I hunt deer when I actually do go hunting, routinely loses 25-40% of the corn crop to deer.

ShagRock
10-31-2009, 10:31 PM
Well, with that many deer, folks don't have to eat as much corn.

Phillip Allen
11-01-2009, 12:12 AM
down here deer like that end up in the mash barrel

Ethan
11-01-2009, 12:16 AM
Alabama's rifle season runs from the week before Thansgiving until January 31st. Most counties allow a buck and a doe per day, for a $22 hunting license.

I go for about an hour walk in the woods here in Hell just about everyday. I have seen at least one deer everyday for the last week.

Size-wise, they put AL deer to shame, eh? Wait till it snows.....!

Paul Pless
11-01-2009, 06:25 AM
Yeah... its well established that midwestern deer are larger than southern deer. Ethan, did you know that practically all the white tail deer in Alabama are descended from Michigan deer. Apparently after the turn of the previous century the whitetail in Alababma had been almost wiped out and teh state of Alabama 'imported' deeer from Michiganm to reestablish its herd.

Virgin Gal
11-01-2009, 08:14 AM
Here is the one in our yard.
http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47b9cf20b3127ccef8d6e8198b9300000030O09AcM27Vw0bA9 vPgw/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/

Mrleft8
11-01-2009, 08:20 AM
The one!!!??? :eek: How about one of the many. One about like Dan's little friend was in the garden eating calendula flowers friday. It looked annoyed when I opened the door and yelled at it. It took another bite and sullenly walked away.

Phillip Allen
11-01-2009, 08:24 AM
laughing, Doug...folks don't have any idea what pests they can turn into... :)

John Boone
11-01-2009, 04:32 PM
5 more days of bow season here then, 1 week blackpowder and gun season till January 1.

Canon w/telephoto all year long :D

http://i222.photobucket.com/albums/dd304/jsbpbacct/Wildlife/IMG_6889-1.jpg

BrianW
11-01-2009, 04:54 PM
Nice deer pictures!

Our Blacktails are pretty small...

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v136/BrianW/hunting/billsdeerwitheveryone.jpg

Willin'
11-01-2009, 09:19 PM
Thanks Dan!

Barley and I took our last long hike in the woods yesterday (didn't know it was the season opener, but there always seems to be shooting going on around here, so how would we know?).

Friends in NH swear that the deer rise up on hind legs to filch fresh apples off the high branches of their trees. I'd purely love to see a picture of that.

Phillip Allen
11-01-2009, 09:28 PM
Thanks Dan!

Barley and I took our last long hike in the woods yesterday (didn't know it was the season opener, but there always seems to be shooting going on around here, so how would we know?).

Friends in NH swear that the deer rise up on hind legs to filch fresh apples off the high branches of their trees. I'd purely love to see a picture of that.

I've seen pics of deer doing just that...

John Boone
11-07-2009, 06:46 PM
Here you go Willin. I took this shot yesterday just before dusk.

This small buck was working over a low hanging pine branch with his antlers.

http://i222.photobucket.com/albums/dd304/jsbpbacct/Wildlife/Img_6929-Crop.jpg

Regards, John

paladin
11-07-2009, 09:36 PM
Critters would snitch my apples that way. It's surprising how high up they can actually reach.

Kaa
11-07-2009, 09:52 PM
Not my backyard, but still... :-)

http://i296.photobucket.com/albums/mm161/kaa_photobucket/20040630_0056_RAW.jpg


Kaa

purri
11-07-2009, 11:12 PM
Here you go Willin. I took this shot yesterday just before dusk.

This small buck was working over a low hanging pine branch with his antlers.

http://i222.photobucket.com/albums/dd304/jsbpbacct/Wildlife/Img_6929-Crop.jpg

Regards, John


They also "preach" (scent mark territory) the same way.

Chip-skiff
11-08-2009, 02:17 AM
Brian— Nice blacktail buck. Where is the photo? Krusof Island, maybe?

ChaseKenyon
11-08-2009, 06:06 AM
Town next to us has a town compact. That means you can't hunt in the center of town residential district about 75 homes. The deer do a number on the yards flowers and such. 17 years ago ran a morning newspaper route between engineering jobs for awhile. At dawn you could see deer at houses with feet up on the outside sill stretching to eat the flowers out of the hanging basket at sash joint mid level where the flowers were supposed to be safe. THird hand but it was said that a ten year old kid got in big trouble with fish and game for killing a big doe with a rock and a super slingshot that was eating the flowers he had planted in window boxes he made in scouts for his mother.

Here in our part of NH deer are the biggest varmint pest to yards land and crops followed by
Beavers, oversize Coyote (up to 100lbs), wild turkeys, bear, Fisher very destructive critters and viscious as a wolverine, Feral chikens are a yard problem also. travel in packs like Turkeys eating everything in thier path including you whole garden. I only see two wild species coperating with man here. First you can only see luck and at least an 800 mm tele lens and that is the Lynx. The Coyotes have moved with their size incrrease on to lartger game so now the lynx has the needed small game to survive and grow.
The other is even harder to spot and I have only spotted back when I drove the back roads from 1:00 Am til 7:00 Am for the paper or times since filling in for a freind who still does that. That is the Cougar aka North american Mountain Lion. State says no not here but we have sightings and tracks and pictures from al the last 15 years. They first moved into the protected from humans isolated corridor between the North and south lanes of I 89 from Hopkinton up to Lebanon. They have since branched out into many of our wilderness preserve corridors THat abut. It is the Deer population that draws them, in a lean year they take dogs and such like the one I saw with a cocker spaniel in it's mouth From 15 feet away.

As an environmentalist and naturist all my life the biggest problem is RE-forested areas like NH and the imbalance of prey and predators to stabilize each other.

Trapping and hunting with awareness of the balance not "I got mine" are the best tools we have to help nature re-stabilize our Re-forested wild woods.

Chase

Ron Williamson
11-08-2009, 06:48 AM
What's wrong with fishers?
Natural Resources re-introduced(They were trapped out) them here, to beat down the porcupine population. Of course,the occasional kitty goes missing...
R

Willin'
11-08-2009, 09:25 AM
Town next to us has a town compact. That means you can't hunt in the center of town residential district about 75 homes. The deer do a number on the yards flowers and such. 17 years ago ran a morning newspaper route between engineering jobs for awhile. At dawn you could see deer at houses with feet up on the outside sill stretching to eat the flowers out of the hanging basket at sash joint mid level where the flowers were supposed to be safe. THird hand but it was said that a ten year old kid got in big trouble with fish and game for killing a big doe with a rock and a super slingshot that was eating the flowers he had planted in window boxes he made in scouts for his mother.

Here in our part of NH deer are the biggest varmint pest to yards land and crops followed by
Beavers, oversize Coyote (up to 100lbs), wild turkeys, bear, Fisher very destructive critters and viscious as a wolverine, Feral chikens are a yard problem also. travel in packs like Turkeys eating everything in thier path including you whole garden. I only see two wild species coperating with man here. First you can only see luck and at least an 800 mm tele lens and that is the Lynx. The Coyotes have moved with their size incrrease on to lartger game so now the lynx has the needed small game to survive and grow.
The other is even harder to spot and I have only spotted back when I drove the back roads from 1:00 Am til 7:00 Am for the paper or times since filling in for a freind who still does that. That is the Cougar aka North american Mountain Lion. State says no not here but we have sightings and tracks and pictures from al the last 15 years. They first moved into the protected from humans isolated corridor between the North and south lanes of I 89 from Hopkinton up to Lebanon. They have since branched out into many of our wilderness preserve corridors THat abut. It is the Deer population that draws them, in a lean year they take dogs and such like the one I saw with a cocker spaniel in it's mouth From 15 feet away.

As an environmentalist and naturist all my life the biggest problem is RE-forested areas like NH and the imbalance of prey and predators to stabilize each other.

Trapping and hunting with awareness of the balance not "I got mine" are the best tools we have to help nature re-stabilize our Re-forested wild woods.

Chase


That's a really tall deer, thanks John!

Chase,

Not to be argumentative as I'm sure there's lots about game population dynamics that I don't understand but, in the natural world wouldn't the growth of predator populations like fishers, lynxs, cougars and coyotes keep the turkeys , feral chickens and deer populations under control? It seems odd that both populations are considered problematic.

Here in the Burg, we enjoy seeing the occasional turkeys, moose and deer that wander through our woods. The twitchy hunter population seems to be the problem. Game species barely stand a chance.

huisjen
11-08-2009, 10:20 AM
Chase, we don't have mountain lions here either. ;)

I saw one walk across the ice on my pond about six years ago though.
It was not a bobcat.
It was not a canine.
It had a really long tail.

Dan

ChaseKenyon
11-08-2009, 12:05 PM
Not to be argumentative as I'm sure there's lots about game population dynamics that I don't understand but, in the natural world wouldn't the growth of predator populations like fishers, lynxs, cougars and coyotes keep the turkeys , feral chickens and deer populations under control? It seems odd that both populations are considered problematic.

One might think so but.....

The predators are more careful about environment and staying secretive than the Game. Coyotes don't seem to care for Turkey. Nor do the Cougar.

THe Coyote will go after anything as a matter of ease or convenience. However they have recently started going after healthy deer imitating wolf like packs with several leaders and sometimes an alpha pair as leaders. Learning the tricks of the wolf for bigger and better game and more regular than Coyote have ever been credited for in history..

This may prove devastating to the Cougar as they are pretty much dependent on a good deer population for health and the urge to procreate.

So the next few years are very important. We may see a bounty on Coyote beyond the value of their fur.


It would help if more parts of the country had seen and handled a properly tanned in full winter coat large Coyote pelt. they should be called the king of furs, so soft and luxurious with three different layers of fur so silky soft from chinchilla soft under fur to main coon cat underfur in the middle layer and then cover fur/hairs that are still as soft as maine coon cats. Need a market that makes trapping them down to manageable levels worth trapping time and expense, and even then will probably need a bounty on top of that .

WE messed up the balance and now we are seeing how complex it is.

As the second generation forest of hardwoods replaces the prior to clear cutting for sheep in the late 1800s ever green forests you have a new kind of woodland.

Back when it was an evergreen central and northern NH there was balance in nature. Now we have some game and some predators that have adapted well to the new deciduous forest and cover. We also have game and predators necessary to the balance who are having trouble to not here at all with the new kind of woodland.

So even though we have a forested NH more forest land than anytime since the mid 1800s, It is not the same kind of forest and it is an unknown as to how it could have a balance of nature between prey and hunter animals, including mankind as hunters.

NO simple solutions wil be found. care and triple checking posibile outcomes before proceding are the best we can do.:rolleyes:

chase

Rich VanValkenburg
11-08-2009, 01:50 PM
I live in an area where there are usually a lot of deer, but this year has been pretty naked. An albino doe was running around all summer but disappeared a month ago. There's shooting all year round out here. You know they're not target shooting when you hear a single shot, or maybe two. I think I've got some pretty hungry neighbors.

I forgot to mention that they don't seem to go after the apples as much as the carrots or sugar beets. Years ago we put out a pile of apples and a pile carrots. The next week the carrots were gone and the apples were untouched.

Captain Blight
11-08-2009, 01:54 PM
That's an absolutely enormous rack, for a blacktail.

Whitetails are getting to be a serious problem in a lot of the country, especially the Northeast. People, and by that I mean "suburban soccer moms" like to see deer around... but aren't willing to recognize when they're overpopulated and the rate of deer-car collisions go through the ceiling, or when their shrubberies get chewed down to nubs. Then they don't want there to be so many deer, but aren't willing to have them bowhunted.

Crom save from suburban soccer moms.

Willin'
11-08-2009, 07:00 PM
One might think so but.....

The predators are more careful about environment and staying secretive than the Game. Coyotes don't seem to care for Turkey. Nor do the Cougar.

THe Coyote will go after anything as a matter of ease or convenience. However they have recently started going after healthy deer imitating wolf like packs with several leaders and sometimes an alpha pair as leaders. Learning the tricks of the wolf for bigger and better game and more regular than Coyote have ever been credited for in history..

This may prove devastating to the Cougar as they are pretty much dependent on a good deer population for health and the urge to procreate.

So the next few years are very important. We may see a bounty on Coyote beyond the value of their fur.


It would help if more parts of the country had seen and handled a properly tanned in full winter coat large Coyote pelt. they should be called the king of furs, so soft and luxurious with three different layers of fur so silky soft from chinchilla soft under fur to main coon cat underfur in the middle layer and then cover fur/hairs that are still as soft as maine coon cats. Need a market that makes trapping them down to manageable levels worth trapping time and expense, and even then will probably need a bounty on top of that .

WE messed up the balance and now we are seeing how complex it is.

As the second generation forest of hardwoods replaces the prior to clear cutting for sheep in the late 1800s ever green forests you have a new kind of woodland.

Back when it was an evergreen central and northern NH there was balance in nature. Now we have some game and some predators that have adapted well to the new deciduous forest and cover. We also have game and predators necessary to the balance who are having trouble to not here at all with the new kind of woodland.

So even though we have a forested NH more forest land than anytime since the mid 1800s, It is not the same kind of forest and it is an unknown as to how it could have a balance of nature between prey and hunter animals, including mankind as hunters.

NO simple solutions wil be found. care and triple checking posibile outcomes before proceding are the best we can do.:rolleyes:

chase

Thanks for your thoughtful reply, Chase. After I sent my last post I almost deleted it for fear that I might start yet another gun control debacle. Hopefully we'll find some balance between human and game predator/prey dynamics as the climax forest evolves due to human population growth.

Mark

Chip-skiff
11-08-2009, 11:38 PM
Kaa-

That looks like a European red deer, a relative of the North American elk or wapiti. They're farmed in NZ and other places. It damn sure ain't a North American deer species.

Kaa
11-09-2009, 12:37 AM
Kaa-

That looks like a European red deer, a relative of the North American elk or wapiti. They're farmed in NZ and other places. It damn sure ain't a North American deer species.

That would be a right damn shame, to have a European red deer relax in the grass somewhere on the border of Colorado and Wyoming... :D

That's an elk.

Note to our friends from across the pond: that's not what you call an elk. What you call an elk we call a moose. :-)

Kaa

purri
11-09-2009, 12:40 AM
It's a wapiti.

huisjen
12-02-2009, 10:31 PM
Well I think someone else got my deer. Congratulations to young Ms. Cousins of Ellsworth, who hit one in front of my driveway. No damage to her car either. The deer was still breathing when I got out there and found Cousins and her three friends (one female, two male, all in their late teens) looking at it, arguing about whether she should have called the warden. (She just had.)

I went back in and got the .22 and a knife. On of the guys administered two shots to the head. That just riled her up. I put the gun away. One of the Sheriff's guys showed up and gave her two .40 cal slugs, on in the head and one in the heart. She still took her time in shuffling off the mortal coil.

The deputy issued her a tag. Apparently if you hit a deer you get to keep it. Miss Cousins wanted to tie it to her trunk, but one of the guys convinced her to leave it with me while they went and got a truck. (He lives just down the road.) While I waited for their return, another truck rolled by and asked if the carcass was spoken for. Good thing I was being neighborly and watching it for them.

Dan

Phillip Allen
12-02-2009, 10:35 PM
that second truck musta been an Arkie...we eat lots of road-kill down here

bobbys
12-02-2009, 11:14 PM
last year a deer was hit by a car on the Highway.

The police came and refused to shoot it.

It was near the movie Theater and teens were crying as the deer crawled around in pain.

A friend of mine said we need to kill this deer fast.

We cut its throat or he did as i tried to hold it down..
I will never do that again im lucky that deer did not disembowel me.

Some of the teen girls were screaming, It was brutal but had to be done.

I wish the cops had shot it but they said they could not shoot in town

boylesboats
12-03-2009, 03:58 AM
last year a deer was hit by a car on the Highway.

The police came and refused to shoot it.

It was near the movie Theater and teens were crying as the deer crawled around in pain.

A friend of mine said we need to kill this deer fast.

We cut its throat or he did as i tried to hold it down..
I will never do that again im lucky that deer did not disembowel me.

Some of the teen girls were screaming, It was brutal but had to be done.

I wish the cops had shot it but they said they could not shoot in town

"but they said they could not shoot in town"

Ooooh, come on now... Thats too easy.. if I start shootin'.. would they (cop)?

Why didn't they call animal control...

Phillip Allen
12-03-2009, 09:21 AM
gad that sounds miserable...I understand throat cutting ain't as easy as the movies would have us believe

bobbys
12-03-2009, 01:51 PM
"but they said they could not shoot in town"

Ooooh, come on now... Thats too easy.. if I start shootin'.. would they (cop)?

Why didn't they call animal control....

Animal control in our small town consists of one Officer that picks up stray dogs once in awhile.

I think there's to much liability for a policeman to discharge his weapon around houses..

Or maybe they just did not care.....

Phillip Allen
12-03-2009, 01:53 PM
I accept that...but could a non policeman shoot it

bobbys
12-03-2009, 01:55 PM
gad that sounds miserable...I understand throat cutting ain't as easy as the movies would have us believe.

Hard to cut a Deers throat with a pocket knive.

Even with a sharp hunting knife its hard to cut through the hide..

I only did it once when after I shot a deer down in a Canyon i left my rifle at the top figuring the deer was dead.

Got to the bottom and it was still alive.

Trick is to do it right away and fast before one thinks about it .

boylesboats
12-03-2009, 11:02 PM
gad that sounds miserable...I understand throat cutting ain't as easy as the movies would have us believe

Tell me about it... Deer hairs make sharpest knife seem dull while through it...
Easiest way is dagger type knife,... uh,... never mind the detail on here.. Hope you get the drift...

I rarely have to cut any thoat, due to heavy .50 cal lead ball does the good job bringn' down deer.. no wasted meat.. one shot.. all its take.. never a heart shot.. and ya don't eat the antlers, do ya?

boylesboats
12-03-2009, 11:03 PM
.

Hard to cut a Deers throat with a pocket knive.

Even with a sharp hunting knife its hard to cut through the hide..

I only did it once when after I shot a deer down in a Canyon i left my rifle at the top figuring the deer was dead.

Got to the bottom and it was still alive.

Trick is to do it right away and fast before one thinks about it .

It ain't the hide.. its the hairs... Hair rolls with the knife edge.. My sharp huntin' knife will slice through the hide like a hot knife through butter... But hairs always get in the way.. once you get the point of knife under the hairs... just flip the knife over edge up, and cut out from underneath the hide... I have dressed a deer out before with a pocket knife once.. Sometime I still think pocketknives are handy in the areas where that broadbladed huntin' knives does not fit... a small hatchet or (hawks) are needed to split the pelvis..

That pop pop pop,... pop pop pop sound of knife blade going through rib cage near the breast bone, always sounded odd.. just stand clear and cut up and away from yourself..

bobbys
12-03-2009, 11:52 PM
It ain't the hide.. its the hairs... Hair rolls with the knife edge.. My sharp huntin' knife will slice through the hide like a hot knife through butter... But hairs always get in the way.. once you get the point of knife under the hairs... just flip the knife over edge up, and cut out from underneath the hide... I have dressed a deer out before with a pocket knife once.. Sometime I still think pocketknives are handy in the areas where that broadbladed huntin' knives does not fit... a small hatchet or (hawks) are needed to split the pelvis..

That pop pop pop,... pop pop pop sound of knife blade going through rib cage near the breast bone, always sounded odd.. just stand clear and cut up and away from yourself...

Most of the time i just carry my Roofing razor knife if im just going to gut a deer in the woods.

We skin them at home, I rigged up a hand winch in the carport and we can adjust the height as we skin.

If we have a elk we just back the truck up and winch it up.

I got the set up from a old guy who used it to lift his truck canopy, We made a leg spreader bar.

My boy and his friends use it all the time.

A sawzall works great for cutting the legs off

2MeterTroll
12-03-2009, 11:59 PM
not much to our deer the little blacktails are about the size of a large dog. just take a good stout chunk of fire wood with you on a walk in the woods and club the dumb things.

gut em stick em in the game pocket of your vest and continue with your walk. it'll take two or three days to get enough for a meal, depending on your appetite.
I find stewing works best then you dont have to pick all those small bones out.

2MeterTroll
12-04-2009, 12:02 AM
Hus come on out here and i will get you so close you will have to wipe the deer snot off the lenses.

boylesboats
12-04-2009, 01:06 AM
.A sawzall works great for cutting the legs off

Ya got that right... in quick order too..:D

boylesboats
12-04-2009, 01:13 AM
not much to our deer the little blacktails are about the size of a large dog. just take a good stout chunk of fire wood with you on a walk in the woods and club the dumb things.

gut em stick em in the game pocket of your vest and continue with your walk. it'll take two or three days to get enough for a meal, depending on your appetite.
I find stewing works best then you dont have to pick all those small bones out.

you gotta be kidding about the size of animal..
Whitetails around here do get big and fat... about 200 pounds and up.. stands about 3' to 3'-6" at the shoulders...
Let alone standin' next to a tree and watch one walked by ya so close you can count the eye lashes on 'em..
I had that happened a few time... Couldn't take 'em, wasn't legal deer..

BrianW
12-04-2009, 02:33 AM
They're not all that small...

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v136/BrianW/hunting/billsdeerwitheveryone.jpg

and they add up quickly...

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v136/BrianW/hunting/whackingandstacking.jpg

2MeterTroll
12-04-2009, 03:13 AM
you gotta be kidding about the size of animal..
Whitetails around here do get big and fat... about 200 pounds and up.. stands about 3' to 3'-6" at the shoulders...
Let alone standin' next to a tree and watch one walked by ya so close you can count the eye lashes on 'em..
I had that happened a few time... Couldn't take 'em, wasn't legal deer..

the heard i am talking about you have to push them off the trails. i used to have to pick up the fawns and put them in a meadow cause they would do the fawn drop in the middle of the road. the adults will literally come up and sniff you. most are about three feet at the withers with a couple bigger that wander in from time to time. but i aint joshing when i say many forks and spikes will only dress out to about 80 lbs if your lucky. the bush bucks get bigger but you wont even see them during hunting season. two hours to the high desert and you are in muley country they get a touch larger.
what we do have is Elk, lots of elk :) and they are freezer fillers. mid west has white tails and they will go 200lbs but we have coastal black tails and they just dont get that big.

floatingkiwi
12-04-2009, 04:09 AM
In New, zealand back in the late 70's and 80's, deer recovery from the wild,was the big thing, with farmers fencing areas and paying, on the spot johnny, for live deer, usually flown in, having been captive sometimes by only a couple of minutes.The usual method was with helicopter, and a net gun fired from outside the line of the skids, (least you shoot one off), which was a shotgun that branched into three barrels, a long steel weight in each, these being the corners of a triangular net. Bigger nets and different shapes were also fired from prepacked nets mounted on the skids. Anyway. the pilot would get hair raisingly close to all kinds of hazards during these times and many lost their lives along with many strong young New Zealand men, at the hands of this lucrative and adrenaline filled game. I knew a gal in Te Anau, South Island,some years back, who had lost three husbands, all machine pilots in deer recovery. She was married at the time, to a pilot.
So once a stag is semibound, loosely about the neck and antlers,or sometimes not at all, ....and still charging flat tack across a scree slope of say 60 degrees,dotted with big rocks and precipitous dropoffs, one of the lads will dive out of the machine hopefully hitting both antlers with both hands, wrestle that sumbitch to the ground quick fast, hogtie that sucker, grab the hook which should by now be swinging somewhere near his ears and connected to the big noisy metal bird thing, connect it to the deer and sometimes yourself aswell, and a few minutes later, the bewildered animal is groggily wobbling about its new enclosure.
Speaking of being disembowelled, I know guys that have had antlers in places I don't care to mention right now.

huisjen
12-04-2009, 10:44 AM
When I do chickens I stab through the neck and slice forward and out to sever the windpipe and jugular. Seems like that would dull your blade less.

Dan